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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English

This page was created at 10:52 AM on Sun, Mar 18, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for English.

What's New This Week in English.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

For a listing of the Fall 2001 courses that fulfill concentration requirements, please visit the English Dept. web site at: http://www.las.umich.edu/english/courses/

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department [(734) 764-6330].

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Compostion, students may elect English 225 for further practice in fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 and 425 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. You may take either fiction or poetry, or you may take English 227-Introduction to Playwriting. 223 is the prerequisite to the more advanced creative writing courses 323, 423 or 429. Admission to these advanced course is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY/INTERNSHIPS:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Fall Term 2001 is September 26, 2001.

Occasionally a student will have an opportunity to work with a compnay or institution as an intern. As a result, the English department has decided to offer their concentrators one academic credit for student internships. Applications will be considered and approved by the Undergraduate Director. You may pick up an application form in 3187 Angell Hall.

ENGLISH 239 & 240

239-What is Literature and, 240-Introduction to Poetry are the two prerequisite courses to the concentration in English. 223-Creative Writing is added when doing the subconcentration in Creative Writing. There are many program paths a student can choose in English, which include the subconcentration in Creative Writing(non-Honors,Honors), English and Education Certification, and Honors in English. For further information on these programs and program plans in English, contact a concentration advisor in English by calling the main office at: (734) 764-6330.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century - to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.

UPPER-LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT

Students enrolling in English courses that fulfill the Upper Level Writing Requirement for LSA must select the designation at registration. Please check the English Department's website to find courses listed as fulfilling the ULWR.


ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 Black Multiculturalism. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 104.001.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By examining key African American and Caribbean (Latino, Haitian, and West Indian) literary, musical, and filmic texts we will gain insight into the battles fought and the bridges built in the creation of Black culture and identity in the U.S. Both Caribbean immigrants and African American migrants from the South brought their own culture, music, and dreams of a utopian North (America). These cultures and dreams have clashed and blended, resulting in a variety of definitions and expressions of Blackness. We will analyze the development of these definitions and expressions in relation to each other, considering questions such as: Are African American and West Indian equivalent in the U.S.? Should works written by African Americans that are set in the Caribbean categorized as Caribbean or as African American? Is the music of Wyclef Jean and/or Lauryn Hill African American or is it Caribbean? Are the portrayals of Caribbean Blacks in How Stella Got Her Groove Back stereotypical? Is or can Latinidad be Blackness? (At key points we will also reference African Canadian, Caribbean Canadian, and Black British texts and cultures.)

Required texts: Edwidge Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory; Junot Diaz, Drown Frederick Douglass, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass; Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Paule Marshall, Brown Girl, Brownstones; Claude McKay, Home to Harlem; Course pack with excerpts and articles authors include Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Bennett, Nicolas Guillen, Stuart Hall, and Carole Boyce Davies

Course Requirements: Short weekly essays, midterm exam, individual and group presentations, final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 The Making Of Race, The Making Of Fiction. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 104.002

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar we will discuss close readings and critical analyses of a variety of fictional texts that engage with historical and contemporary understandings of race in the US. Through a combination of fiction writers from 19th and 20th centuries, including Octavia Butler, Herman Melville, Toni Morrison, and Mark Twain, we will explore genre and narrative elements in order to assess how these texts say what they say about slavery, racial identity, history, and literature. For example, how have US writers shaped their diverse fictions in response to the debates over the meanings of race? And how have these meanings changed over time? In addition to seminar discussion, class assignments will include intensive writing work in the form of short responses, peer review of drafts, and paper revisions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 The Memoir as Art and Remembrance

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The art of the author's personal memory, whether taking the form of autobiography, fiction, drama or film, has found great favor in recent years. Examples from several genres will help us study the importance of memory and the artistic forms it can take. We will try to determine what these varied works have to say about the individuals recalling their life and times. Probable authors and filmmakers: Russell Baker, Phillip Roth, Eva Hoffman, Frank McCourt, Primo Levi, Geoffrey Wolff, Tobias Wolff, Margaret Atwood, Woody Allen, and Federico Fellini. Class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. One short paper; one longer critical/analytical essay. Course requires your actively and intelligently participating presence as we try to learn together [which is the nature of a seminar] about the nature and importance of remembrance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030, 031.

Instructor(s): Randall L Tessier (rlt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Ralph D Story

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 227 / Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001, 002 Telling Stories: The Art of Narration

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will want, in this class, to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones From the River, thinks: "Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone."

Our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process our own as well as the authors. We will want to begin by trying to uncover the strong need of each individual to tell his or her story. Moreover, as the semester continues and we discuss various 20th-century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to pay particular attention to the narrators of each story we read. Ultimately, I hope we can understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to "speak" to us.

Although the final syllabus decision has not been made, I am sure we will want to listen to John Irving's narrator for Owen Meany and Gloria Naylor's variety of narrators telling us the story of Mama Day. There will be 2 essays, a midterm and final exam required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lemuel A Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How and why do we learn to read a text if the author is God, Shakespeare, and Walt Disney? What accounts for the difference in our responses? Should there be such differences? Why? How are those differences produced or reinforced? Also, how do we change from being "true-believer" readers of a given text to resisting readers of the same text? What roles do language & nationality, gender & age, and class & ethnicity play in all this? Consider: what does it mean to not believe in the words of Scripture? Would this be the same thing as not believing in, say, Hamlet & Moby Dick, Grapes of Wrath & Chaucer's Canterbury Tales? What kinds of compensation do we expect, or what penalty do we fear, when we give any answer at all to the course question: What is Literature? Where would the compensation, or penalty, come from? Is a given text say, Maxine Hong Kingston's Woman Warrior or Charles Dickens' Great Expectations or Cervantes' Don Quijote private or public property? Does it belong to the Author? The Reader? The Nation? the Local School Board? How free is any one group to make a text be what it wants it to mean? Major project comes at the end of the term, with a complet-the-syllabus assignment. Students choose a text on their own, and work that text through questions like the ones above. Short reports (1-2 pages) will be required on all assigned readings.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004 Literatures of the United States

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will be looking at a number of short stories, a few novels and films to answer the questions: What is literature? and What is American that is, United States literature? We will be looking at some critical and theoretical pieces to determine what constitutes "literature" (how do we decide what is and isn't "literature"?) and what constitutes "United States literature" (is it US literature simply because it was written by someone in the United States? can an expatriate William James comes to mind write US literature? or is there some "thing" some element in the text that makes a piece "American"? Is there a mainstream canon of United States literature with other streams of "minority literature" running alongside or behind it or ahead of it? or does it consist of all streams running together, merging into a single current?) Our readings will consist of a variety of texts representing many American voices, and novels may include Cold Mountain, Underworld, and Ceremony. Requirements include one short paper, a final exam, an oral presentation as well as participation in class discussions and in a class computer conference.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005 Global Literature.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the most exciting consequences of the development of English as a global language has been the emergence of a body of writing that has challenged the assumed relationship between nation, language, and literature. This course will be an invitation to discover this "new" English literature, its elaborate cultural context, and its inventive use of the English language. Through a reading of both established and new writing from Africa, India, the Caribbean, and the Pacific, we will explore the ways in which this literature has developed in response to the complex relationship between Britain and her former colonies, the demands of nationalism and narratives of cultural identity, and the challenges of producing literature in the language of "the other." How does this new literature reconcile its need to represent local situations with its global ambition? Does the new English literature demand different strategies of reading and interpretation? How has it transformed the form of the English language and its institutions of interpretation? To answer these questions we will read a selection of writers from Africa (Amos Tutuola, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Yvonne Viera and Tsitsi Dangarembga), India (R. Tagore, R. K. Narayan, Mulk Raj Anand, Anita Desai, and B. Mukherjee), the Caribbean (Derek Walcott and Jean Rhys), and the Pacific (Albert Wendt).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will focus on fiction to explore some of the factors prompting the question "what is literature?" From their inception, as John Fowles contends, fiction writers shared the "wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Imitating life was the goal, even in as diverse renderings of so-called "reality" as George Eliot's depiction of "ordinary life," or R.L. Stevenson's fantasy-like version of the odd couple of Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde; or Virginia Woolf's impressionistic interior monologues. Even post-modern writers, cynical about any professed connection between literature and reality, presented their own versions of reality by foregrounding their failure to control what the story were writing (John Fowles) or denying any privileged information about their characters (both Fowles and Tim O'Brien). We will discuss not only the shifting literary styles, but the shifting philosophical definitions of what constitutes social and psychological reality that shaped them. Texts will include, John Fowles' The French Lieutenant's Woman; Toni Morrison's Sula; short stories by Hemingway and Kundera, Tim O'Brien's In the Lake of the Woods, Art Spiegelman's Maus I and II, Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse. Any additional texts will be listed on my website. Requirements: two essays, a midterm and a final, class participation, and regular attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 The Family

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What we call "family" is often based on our own experience. In this class we will explore various concepts of "family" through reading novels and short stories. As we read Egger's A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, Toni Morrison's Sula; Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping; Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood; Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones; and selected short stories, we will look at how notions of "family" are affected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. There will be three in-class essays. Class participation is essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Susan Najita

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to key terms and practices in the study of literature. This section of "What is Literature?" will combine the study of the genres poetry, short story, novel, play, and film with an introduction to critical perspectives such as psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, linguistics, new historicism, and cultural studies. We will read Shakespeare, Blake, Whitman, Keats, Cisneros, Joyce, Mansfield, Wharton, Faulkner, Morrison, and Hwang, and view the films Bladerunner and Law of Desire. We will familiarize ourselves with issues relating to form, gender and sexual identity, ethnicity, representation, colonialism, narration, and commodity culture. Expectations: 3 papers (one 2-3 page paper, one 3-5 page paper, one 5-7 page paper), weekly quizzes, presentations, enthusiastic participation, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses how our assumptions about gender, ethnicity, and class shape our expectations and readings of literature. Who is literature for? What purpose does it serve? What makes a "good" story or novel, and how do we know this? How do specific literary periods and even technological developments (such as the invention of the computer) change our ideas of literature? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? Students will write a number of informal responses as well as a midterm and three formal papers. Class participation and discussion are essential components of this course. Readings will be chosen from a list that includes Frederick Douglass' Narrative, James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry 240 is a course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at and hear poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an introduction to poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for any Honors student wishing to increase his or her enjoyment and understanding of poetry. Through a wide range of poems we will explore both the ways in which poems work and the ways in which we can understand and improve our responses to them. After an introduction to poetic analysis we will progress chronologically from Shakespeare to the present, emphasizing particularly the diversity of the last two centuries and ending with in-depth study of a major modern poet (probably W.B. Yeats). Class discussion and occasional informal lectures will focus primarily on close reading of individual texts, but students should also emerge from the course with some grasp of the historical development of poetry in English. Frequent short papers, the last of which will serve as a final exam; no prerequisites. The text will be The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Fourth Edition.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams, short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so), and two five page analytical papers. The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): James H Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students interested in reading poetry with increased pleasure and understanding. We will read specific poems closely to illustrate questions of voice, narrative, diction, rhythm and meter, sound, figures of speech, the line, form, authorship, audience, and context. Students will also learn something about the historical development of poetry in English. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a brief but detailed study of the work of one author, perhaps Elizabeth Bishop. We will also explore how poetry can help create communities and stimulate moral and political thinking and feeling. I expect to ask students to write four short papers and a midterm. Other requirements for the course are regular attendance and active participation in class. Final grades will reflect all the requirements. Texts: Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms, and The Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim here is to enhance our enjoyment of poetry. How poetry uses language uniquely, how rhythm, rhyme and meter give pleasure and highlight meaning these are some of the subjects we will study, along with metaphor and other kinds of figurative language. We will also examine how a poem means one thing by saying something different (irony). Most Wednesdays a short quiz will be given on details of what we have been studying. These quizzes and other brief assignments will count for 25% of your total grade. You will also be assigned the occasional two-page paper and one five-pager. Textbooks: Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems: 1929-1979. Seamus Heaney, Selected Poems: 1966-1987. Seamus Heaney & Ted Hughes, The Rattlebag. Also a short course pack.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introduction to lyric poetry will draw its reading from a wide historical range, from the earliest poetry in English to the present. Its aim is to teach you how to read poetry with understanding and delight; to this end, we will attend closely to the techniques and resources of language that poets use to articulate their visions of experience. We will consider especially matters of form (including diction, prosody, tone, and figurative language) and the way they shape themes, voice, intertextual connections, and poetic traditions. Classes will proceed mainly by intensive discussion of a few poems each day. Assignments to include short exercises, some memorizing, three or four short papers, and a final.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 011.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 012.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 245 / RC Hums. 280 / Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study some of the major American fiction from the last part of the nineteenth and first part of the twentieth century, stressing the study of social convention and the individual's relation to it. Works to be read include Huck Finn, Daisy Miller, The Red Badge of Courage, The Awakening, The Age of Innocence, The Great Gatsby, As I Lay Dying, and Their Eyes Were Watching God. There will be frequent short writing assignments, two 4-5 page papers, and two exams.

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ENGLISH 274 / AAS 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study the emergence and early development of African American literature in the US, from 1773 to 1912. Through close readings of a wide variety of African American texts and genres, we will explore the constraints and opportunities that governed the writing of these texts. We will ask: how did these novels, autobiographies and poetry speak to the different experiences and concerns of African Americans in the US? How did they help blacks gain a national voice in a slaveholding and racially polarized nation? Writers include Frederick Douglass, Williams Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper and Charles Chestnutt. Assignments will include short response papers and midterm and final exams.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the forms and functions of contemporary English. We will consider some of the major dimensions of English structure (orthography, phonetics, intonation, word formation, syntax, etc.) and how these structures characterize both English speakers and their linguistic purposes. During the term, we will explore the social and geographical dialects of Modern English (e.g., British vs. American English and Black English Vernacular), its professional jargons (e.g., the language of advertising, religion, law, and politics), and its situational varieties (e.g., the language of conversation, oral narrative, and literature). Requirements for the course will include weekly exercises and two papers investigating some aspect of Modern English structure or use.

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ENGLISH 310. Discourse and Society.

Section 001 The Henry Ford High School Project

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 124 or 125. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 310 teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school faculty and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford, Cooley, and Southeastern High Schools in Detroit, and at the Adrian and Maxey Training Schools, Boysville, and Vista Maria, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, writings, art, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and teach each other hands-on methods. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 Fantasy.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E.T.A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; Like Water for Chocolate, Laura Esquivel, and Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 007 The Beat Generation.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix."

That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by the work being done by Action Painters and jazz musicians from the Bebop school. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, read poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch, etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings by Jackson Pollock. The course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Expect brief weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final, plus a three-page and a ten-page paper. A half-dozen films will be shown in the evenings after class. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to English majors. The course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 315 / WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 The Black Female Body in Women's Literature of the African Diaspora. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Black woman's body has occupied an important but often overlooked place in U.S. and Caribbean culture. During New World slavery, the condition of permanent bondage was passed down through the body of the Black mother. Black women's bodies were often described as being biologically different from those of white women, thus justifying their differential and denigrating treatment. Black women have also been viewed as the primary bearers of African American and Afro-Caribbean culture; therefore controversies within these communities have often been played out through discussions of and rules about the proper appearance and behavior of the Black female body.

This course will investigate African American and Afro-Caribbean women's representations of the Black female body in literature (and some visual art). Reclaiming the Black female body has been a major project for Black women writers and artists since the nineteenth century. We will read a range of poetry and fiction, including Gayl Jones' Corregidora, Gwendolyn Brooks' "In the Mecca," Jamaica Kincaid's Annie John, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, Paule Marshall's Praisesong for the Widow, and Merle Hodge's Crick Crack, Monkey. We will also view several films and the work of contemporary black female artists like Adrian Piper and Lorna Simpson. Coursework will include 2 brief writing assignments (1-2 pages), 2 short essays (5-7 pages), and a final project.

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ENGLISH 315 / WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 Women's Textual Traditions in Medieval England

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores women's relation to medieval literary culture: we will address works by medieval women, including Marie de France, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe, as well as works accessible to or written for women, including saints' legends, civic drama, devotional literature, and moral instruction. We will also read anonymous texts in a feminine voice (the Findern lyrics) and non-literary texts written by women (letters written by the Paston women). Texts will be studied through the variety of social contexts (court, cloister, and city) in which women's literary activity took place, so that we can trace the relationship between gender and other cultural categories in medieval England. Some key topics for the course include: how expectations about women's relation to literature influenced the texts women wrote, how women writers responded to those expectations in startling ways, and how women's access to certain genres as readers and patrons affected the shape and social meaning of medieval literary traditions. Course requirements: course journal, two papers, and a final exam. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Just because you happen to be a gay man doesn't mean that you don't have to learn how to become one. Gay men do some of that learning on their own, but often we learn how to be gay from others, either because we look to them for instruction or because they simply tell us what they think we need to know, whether we ask for their advice or not.

This course will examine the general topic of the role that initiation plays in the formation of gay male identity. We will approach it from three angles: (1) as a sub-cultural practice subtle, complex, and difficult to theorize which a small but significant body of work in queer studies has begun to explore; (2) as a theme in gay male writing; and (3) as a class project, since the course itself will constitute an experiment in the very process of initiation that it hopes to understand.

In particular, we'll examine a number of cultural artifacts and activities that seem to play a prominent role in learning how to be gay: Hollywood movies, grand opera, Broadway musicals, and other works of classical and popular music, as well as camp, diva-worship, drag, muscle culture, taste, style, and political activism. Are there a number of classically "gay" works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, all gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay? What is there about gay identity that explains the gay appropriation of these works? What do we learn about gay male identity by asking not who gay men are but what it is that gay men do or like? One aim of exploring these questions is to approach gay identity from the perspective of social practices and cultural identifications rather than from the perspective of gay sexuality itself. What can such an approach tell us about the sentimental, affective, or subjective dimensions of gay identity, including gay sexuality, that an exclusive focus on gay sexuality cannot?

At the core of gay experience there is not only identification but disidentification. Almost as soon as I learn how to be gay, or perhaps even before, I also learn how not to be gay. I say to myself, "Well, I may be gay, but at least I'm not like that!" Rather than attempting to promote one version of gay identity at the expense of others, this course will investigate the stakes in gay identifications and disidentifications, seeking ultimately to create the basis for a wider acceptance of the plurality of ways in which people determine how to be gay.

Additional note. This course is not a basic introduction to gay male culture, but an exploration of certain issues arising from it. It assumes some background knowledge. Students wishing to inform themselves about gay men and gay culture in a preliminary way should enroll in an introductory course in lesbian/gay studies.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 Literature of the American Wilderness. Meets with RC Environmental Studies 407.001

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to late twentieth-century responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods (selections), Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome. This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 Religious Dimension of Modern Jewish Literature.

Instructor(s): Julian Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is the relationship between the imaginative and the Judaic? Do modern Jewish writers represent a definitive break with the religious traditions? Or do they recover and reinvigorate these traditions? Is it possible to look to literature to continue the traditional Jewish practice of interpreting the Written and Oral Law? Considering a variety of genres including parables, poetry, novels, and autobiographical essays, this course explores the religious dimension of modern Jewish literature. Writers include I.L. Peretz, Franz Kafka, S.Y. Agnon, Milton Steinberg, Joseph Soloveichik, Cynthia Ozick, Leon Wieseltier, and Marge Piercy. We will consider these writers in relation to Jewish forms such as Midrash, liturgical poetry, and Hasidic storytelling. Requirements include one short paper (3-5 pages), one longer paper (6-8 pages), and a final.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 Rewriting England.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The idea or image of England as the center of a homogenous and pure culture, one reflected in a set of "island" stories untouched by the rest of the world, is perhaps one of the most persistent myths in the study of British literature, society, and culture. In this course we will attempt to question this mythology by focusing on the writing of a group of writers who, in the last twenty or thirty years, have transformed the idea of England by calling attention to the metropolitan, migrant, and hybrid nature of Britain. By reading novels by British writers whose backgrounds or origins are to be found in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, we will try to reflect on how the new, multicultural Britain is generating narratives whose goal is nothing less than the transformation of what it means to be British. How and why did this literature become important to the body of British literature and what is its relationship to established English writing? What forms of writing do "ethnic" British writers use to examine the popular culture and lifestyle of a national culture that is being transformed by people it used to define as outsiders? To answer these questions, we will read novels by Hanif Kureishi, Jacque Kay, Simi Bradford, Diran Adebayo, Meera Syal, Timothy Mo, Kaguro Ishoguro, and Zadie Smith. We will also view video versions of some of the films involved in this (re) thinking of Englishness, including My Beautiful Launderette, Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, and Remains of the Day. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 Rhetorical Activism And U.S. Civil Rights Movements.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The signers of the United States Constitution recognized the power of rhetorical activism when they declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women spent eight decades using the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. The persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed this nation's consciousness as well as the experience of civil rights for all of its citizens. And although the United States did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, people like Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan forever altered the expectations and opportunities for women and men. How did these ordinary people accomplish extraordinary things by speaking up and speaking out? More broadly, how do people use language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from several U.S. civil rights movements: the early woman's rights, antislavery, women's liberation, 1960s civil rights, and gay rights movements. Work for this course includes weekly readings (hard copy and online), exams, and quizzes. This course satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 003 Life Stories.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a course that engages students in the process of collecting and writing life-stories, including their own, this class is tied to the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange's current residency. Lerman is a nationally known choreographer who uses story-telling and writing to create performance pieces in the community. After several weeks of reading, reflection, and training, students in this course will begin to make weekly visits to two Detroit sites, to mentor and facilitate life-writing activities with the school children and elderly there. Lerman troupe members will also conduct several writing/dance workshops in our class and in our community sites, as we all work toward an October performance in Ann Arbor. In class, students will reflect deeply on their community work, as well as read and comment on autobiographical excerpts by such writers as Maya Angelou and Sandra Cisneros. We will focus on how differences in race, ethnicity, gender, and physical ability inform life-stories, and address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? What do they choose to remember, or to forget? No prior dance experience is needed for this course; indeed, many of our Detroit partners have none. Students will be assessed on the quality of their participation both in-class and on their community site, as well as on their written contributions, which include several short journal responses (2-3 pages) and a larger autobiographical essay (8 pages) by the course end.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is a poetry writing workshop intended for student writers with some experience in the art. The hope is that these writers will produce new work and participate in the critical discussion of their own work and that of their colleagues. Members of the class will submit new poems every week for evaluation. A few formal and thematic assignments will be given as needed to help focus some of the writing.

Although the on-going process of writing poems is the central focus of the class, a fair amount of reading and some critical writing will also be required. Final evaluations will be based on 25-30 pages of poetry that has gone through some level of revision, 3 short papers about poetry readings, one classroom presentation on a living poet, and two short classroom presentations on different poetic forms or devices.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 003 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Brenda Kay Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately forty pages.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005.

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling," says T.S. Eliot. In some significant ways a literary text may serve its reader similarly to a past life remembered, a memory, a dream. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, dynamic world out of combining past experience with imagination. How do we carve our lives out of past lives our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what to forget?

We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "what actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts and films we read and view, respectively. It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it. Ultimately our work must lead us to shape essays that are pointed in meaning for our readers. We will work on a great deal of discussion, three 10pp essays, and weekly peer critiques.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002, 003.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline E Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course (1) that gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers), (2) that allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing, (3) that offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and (4) that keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term. Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004, 005.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section will explore questions of how people learn and how people write by doing a lot of reading and writing on the topics of education and composition. Using materials as diverse as Plato's Phaedrus and Elbow's Writing Without Teachers we will consider how students and teachers are "constructed" and how they stand in relation to each other. Stories about teaching such as Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed will help us reflect on our own educational experiences. Stories about learning such as Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory and films such as "Finding Forrester" or "Educating Rita" will help us explore additional issues in writing and education. Come prepared to write about your own educational philosophy or at least your ideas about education and your own educational experiences.

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ENGLISH 327 / Theatre 327. Intermediate Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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ENGLISH 330(412) / Film-Video 330. Major Directors.

Section 001 American Comic Masters Since The 60s: Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Blake Edwards, Hal Ashby.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: F/V 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 330.001.

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ENGLISH 340. Reading and Writing Poetry.

Section 001 Poetry and Science

Instructor(s): Alice Fulton (slippage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 349(449) / Theatre 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 323.001.

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ENGLISH 350 / MEMS 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 New Literary Histories

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Once upon a time, pre-1600 literary history was a nationalist story about the development of great art; it was a tale of masculine achievements stretching from Beowulf to Shakespeare. That story has come to seem inadequate, for it does not address a number of fundamental questions about literary culture: What literature was excluded from the canon and why? What did women write? Did they invent their own literary traditions? Who was the literate majority and how did they define minorities? In this course, students will read texts that allow for diverse answers to such questions, including Beowulf, Marie de France's lais, selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, The Book of Margery Kempe, the poetry and prose of Queen Elizabeth I, and a Shakespeare play. Our goal will be to understand how literary histories are invented-and how we can reinvent them. Course requirements include two essays of approximately 5 pages each, a midterm and a final examination. This course is the first of a two-term sequence designed to study the historical development of literature in English; it satisfies either the pre-1600 or the pre-1830 requirement for English majors.

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ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The family, its formation, tenderness, strains, collapse, and reformation, is perhaps Shakespeare's favorite form, social and symbolic, for the construction of meaning and evocation of feeling. We will especially observe his ceaseless exploration of the dynamics of the family in our reading of a selection of history plays, comedies, tragedies, and romances, from the whole span of his career. Other foci for discussion will include his dramaturgy, and his matchless way with words. Plays to be read will include: Richard II, I&II Henry IV, Henry V, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Othello, King Lear, Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, A Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. I hope to offer, as an optional series, four lectures outside the regular class sessions, on Shakespeare's first history tetralogy, 1, 2, 3 Henry VI, and Richard III. Course requirements will include lively engagement in discussion, three essays (4-6 pp. each), and two examinations.

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ENGLISH 368 / MEMS 368. Shakespeare and his Contemporaries.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of major dramatic works by contemporaries of Shakespeare, along with a few Shakespearean plays selected to highlight the energetic dialogue between very different playwrights. This course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of the stage with cultural controversies of the period. There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 Honors: Love and Heroism. Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read some of the best and most representative works of medieval and early modern English literature, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf (in Seamus Heaney's translation) and ending with Milton's Paradise Lost. Along the way, we will read some Chaucer, Gawain And The Green Knight, a selection of Elizabethan love poetry, and a couple of Shakespeare plays (probably Othello and Antony and Cleopatra). Our focus will be on transformations of heroic and romantic ideals and some of the ways these become entangled. Related concerns will include changing ways of representing women and their roles and visions of social, political, and religious order. There will be in-class exercises, two or three papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Literary Form and Cultural Contexts in English Literature before 1600

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class explores the relationship between early English literature and its historical context by focusing on the genres and literary forms that defined Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and Elizabethan textual traditions. It was difficult and expensive to preserve texts in the eras of manuscript and early print culture, and those that survived have much to tell us about the social role of literature at the beginning of the English tradition. We will explore which genres were prevalent in the early periods, asking what they suggest about the cultural work of literature for contemporary audiences. What social and historical concerns were addressed by early narrative and lyric traditions? How do the cultural transformations of the period (the series of invasions that radically changed English political and social identity, the spread and institutionalization of Christianity, and increasing literacy of the laity) affect the kinds of texts that were written? How do genres that remain important throughout this period, like romance, respond to their historical moment? Our emphasis on literary form will allow us to consider not only the social and historical contexts engaged by these texts, but also how these issues are shaped by literary representation. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 Jewish Culture in America: 1945 to the Present. Meets with Judaic Studies 317.001. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do Jewish writers in America straddle the divide between Jewish culture and modern American life? How do they interpret the collective past and create a collective memory? What features, if any, define the Jewish-American literary canon? What recurring metaphors, images, and characters animate this literature? To respond to these questions, this course explores a range of texts from the immigrant writings of Mary Antin to the post-Holocaust writings of Cynthia Ozick. Other authors include Morris Rosenfeld, Anna Margolin, Jacob Glatstein, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, and Isaac Bashevis Singer. While some of these authors wrote in Yiddish, all of their works will be read in translation. Two papers (4-6 pages), midterm, and final.

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ENGLISH 384 / AAS 384 / Amer. Cult. 406. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Section 001 Life and Literature in the Contemporary Caribbean Diaspora. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course centers on literature, music, and film produced out of Caribbean descended communities in the United States, Canada, England, and Central America (Panama and Costa Rica in particular). The writers (and musicians and filmmakers) we will engage have roots in a variety of Caribbean sites including Jamaica, Haiti, and Puerto Rico and relate to those roots in equally varied ways. Whereas some of the writers come out of relatively recently migrated communities, others are from communities that have been in North or Central America or England for generations. Our focus will be on the ways in which they craft identities and art by juggling their multiple cultural backgrounds and national origins. Specifically, we will explore such questions as: (1) How is home defined in their works? As a place in the Caribbean, as the nation of residence or as an imagined place that is neither? (2) How is home recreated or maintained? Through memories? Through return visits? Through carnival? (3) What differences between Caribbean diasporan communities in racial, cultural, or ethnic self-definition are apparent do they all define themselves as "Black" across the board or do they define themselves based on nation of origin, nation of residence, language, depending on where they live? Why or why not? The class, then, is an exploration of the meanings and perceived relevance of Caribbeanness to people of Caribbean descent in the Americas and Europe. Course requirements: 1 6-page essay, 2 exams, group presentation, and occasional quizzes.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Reading Old English. Meets with English 501.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first object of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison and the Artist.

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Research And Technology In The Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 Comparative Literature: Making Literature in Africa, South America, & North America

Instructor(s): Lemuel A Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in which we will read Chinua Achebe (Nigeria), Leslie Silko (USA), and Alejo Carpentier (Cuba); so too Arthur Miller (USA), Athol Fugard (South Africa), and Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Colombia). Other writers among them Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana), Jorge Amado (Brazil), Walt Whitman (USA), & Chang Rae-Lee (Korean American) as well as Maxine Hong Kingston & Emily Dickinson will help us map a number of key issues for exploration. These will include North-South cultural relationships. For example, the role of European culture in the (un)making of Africa; of Asia in the invention of the Americas; and of North America in the Caribbean. There will also be South-South explorations; and here we will try to find out things like what or how "Asia" means in African literature, and vice-versa. Additionally, we'll focus on certain "master texts" (e.g., Shakespeare, The Bible, The Qur'an) to see how they resonate across cultures. In fact, we just might want to begin with the complex worlds of Africa, Asia, & the Americas that Shakespeare tries to get a grip on in a play like The Merchant of Venice, or, maybe, The Tempest, or Antony and Cleopatra, at the beginning of the early-modern period. Students write short (1 to 2-page) reports & study questions on all assigned readings. There will be a 15 or so page final comparative essay, plus a 5-page written work around midterm.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Poetic Form.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why do blues and rap have the same meter as English medieval alliterative poetry and Vedic chant? Why does a sonnet have fourteen lines? What are the varieties of free verse, what do they do, and why do they exist? What is the essence of the villanelle? If you are interested in such questions, and want to explore them rigorously, this is your course. It's a course designed for poets, poetry-lovers, and scholars. By midterm, everyone will need to choose a research topic for a long essay and a report to other members of the seminar. Our range of consideration will include: meter; the poetic line; phrasal rhythm; stichic form; and strophic form. We will spend a lot of time trying to anatomize free verse, and most of our energy will be devoted to art poetry, but we will also look at and listen to popular poetry, including songs and nursery rhymes. We will briefly consider world poetry in translation, but of course our primary focus will be on English poetic form. In terms of reading volume, the workload will be light (a course pack of 200 pp. and 4 scholarly books on reserve) but the reading itself will be intense (close, exact).

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 Constructing Ireland: Modern Irish Literature.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will study the twentieth-century Irish Literary Renaissance within the twin contexts of Irish literature and Irish history rather than the more usual contexts of British literature and international Modernism. Reading will include poetry by W.B. Yeats, fiction by James Joyce and Elizabeth Bowen, and plays by Lady Gregory, John Synge, and Sean O'Casey, as well as less well-known materials by writers like Douglas Hyde, Patrick Pearse, and Katherine Tynan. We will also read a small amount of history of historical documents, of popular culture (cartoons and songs), and of theoretical material. Bearing in mind that Ireland was England's oldest and longest held colony, we will study particularly the relations between literature and nationalism, between Irish and English contexts for Irish literature, and between nationality and cosmopolitanism in Irish works of this period. Along the way, we will explore hybridity as a model for thinking about culture, perhaps with other cross-cultural comparisons. Written work will depend on class size, but will include at least a paper and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 Art, Community and Change in Detroit.

Instructor(s): David M Sheridan (dsheridn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Though many outsiders construct the city of Detroit as "empty," anyone familiar with the city knows that it is a rich center of culture and creative expression. Moreover, creative expression in Detroit has been inextricably linked to the political and social concerns of the city. This course will examine the intersections of art and community in twentieth century Detroit, with a special emphasis on the post-War period. We'll ask such questions as, How do creative forms reflect and shape the communities that produce them? Can creative forms bring about social change? We'll examine novels, poems, personal narratives, journalistic pieces, and secondary sources, as well as music, paintings, photographs, websites, and mixed genre works. Students should expect to write the equivalent of two polished essays in addition to informal writing. In addition to a course pack of shorter readings, required texts include: Ze've Chafets' Devil's Night and Other True Stories of Detroit, and Harriet Arnow's The Dollmaker, Suzanne Smith's Dancing in the Street: Motown and the Cultural Politics of Detroit. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 Early Women Writers

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What did women write before 1500? How did women comment on feminine sexuality, motherhood, love, religion, work, or money? The answers to these questions are as provocative and various as the women themselves. In order to explore the writings of a wide range of women, we will examine a number of European texts in translation, ranging from the twelfth century to the fifteenth. We will consider Heloise's letters, Marie de France's lais, Christine de Pizan's Book of the City of Ladies, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Margery Kempe's autobiographical Book. Throughout the course, we will draw on modern feminist theory and historicist scholarship so as better to understand the contexts of women's writing. Course requirements include reading responses, a long (15 page) essay, and several oral reports. This course satisfies the New Traditions and Pre-1600 requirements for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 Pacific Literary and Cultural Studies. Meets with American Culture 498.002.

Instructor(s): Najita

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 498.002.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on student work. Each student will write three new stories during the term and rewrite at least two of these stories. Students must also be committed to helping their classmates improve their work through honest yet compassionate responses to their manuscripts. To inspire ourselves to write and help us study various aspects of form and technique, we will also be reading the works of published authors. A major emphasis of this section will be on structure and theme not in the sense of obeying conventional narrative modes or inserting messages, morals, sermons and symbols into a text, but in the sense of figuring out a way to unify a story around a central conflict and question, of discovering why a given story is worth telling. Interested students should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to the first class period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of English 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 427 / Theatre 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 327. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 The Poetics of the Invisible.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be a semester of writing poems that consider what happens at the limits of what may be observed through both microscopes and telescopes, two simultaneous journeys, one probing the boundaries of the internal (a single cell, for instance) the other probing the boundaries of the external (the cosmos, for instance) in order to arrive at a poetry of limits, in order to craft an approach to poetry that emphasizes those stances in which observation is less certain and in which observed behavior tends to depart from convention (where too much poetry is currently formed). Simultaneous concerns, of course, include: what the journey makes us feel, the consequences of emotion, the effects of this journey on ideas of the future, on meaning, and on memory. We will have to shed whatever dependencies we may have on comfortable assumptions in order to accomplish this. We will focus on what happens to existence, to a sense of self, and attempts to navigate existence at the boundaries of knowledge. Texts may include: Verse and Universe, Powers of Ten, On the Surface of Things, and Sphereland.

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ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~ece

The success of the novel as a popular literary genre tends to obscure the fact that it is a fairly recent innovation. In this course we will survey the first century of the novel's development in Britain, reading path-breaking works by such writers as Haywood, Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Lewis, and Austen. What distinguishes the novel, we will ask, from other literary forms, and why did this genre take hold when it did? What were the chief concerns, whether social, moral, or aesthetic, of novelists writing in the eighteenth century, and how did these evolve over the course of the period? Finally, how do the best-sellers of eighteenth-century fiction reflect and contribute to conditions of daily life and thought at the time? Assignment options include dramatic performance, oral presentation, essays, final exam, and group web project (see www.umich.edu/~ece/).for details). This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature 1837-1901 combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorian novelists put all of these elements in the pot and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring readers back for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day e.g. the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. What is arguably most interesting about these novels is the complicted relationship they had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code was liable and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. These oddly subversive elements will provide the focus of this course. We will read classic novels by C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, possibly Trollope and Stevenson, and John Fowles' post-modern novel about 19th century life and fiction, The French Lieutenant's Woman. There will also be brief selections from intellectual and cultural documents, provided on our Website. Requirements include a midterm and final and two essays, regular class attendance and participation in class discussion.

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ENGLISH 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, and Wallace Stevens but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 443 / Theatre 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 001 Meets with Theatre 521.001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.001.

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ENGLISH 443 / Theatre 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001 Drama From Ibsen To Brecht

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the rise of modern drama in the Western world by concentrating on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Brecht. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to read a dramatic text for its performative qualities and its potential for enactment. Although no previous experience in the study of drama or theater is required, the course will begin by concentrating on the differences between the modern repertory and the forms we associate with Classical and Shakespearean dramatic conventions. Other topics of consideration include: the transformation from melodrama to modern drama; the social consciousness of the twentieth-century stage; and the rise of the female figure as subject of dramatic inquiry. Requirements: There will be three papers of 5-7 pages each; a midterm; and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Yiddish Literature In America. Meets with Judaic Studies 317.002.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 474. The "New Negro" Renaissance.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Also known as the "Harlem Renaissance," the "New Negro" Renaissance benefited from the mass migration cityward and northward of black people from the southern U.S. and the West Indies during and after World War I. Promoted as a campaign to fight Jim Crow by providing political, economic, and cultural opportunities, the Renaissance movement brought unprecedented global attention to the literature, art, music, dance, and folklore of people of African descent living in the "New World." Relying on and resisting the patronage of white avant-garde modernists, the New Negroes, as they called themselves, created uplift organizations, social networks, and cultural media to experiment with new modes in literature, sociology, anthropology, and the performing arts. We'll explore works by such leading figures as W. E. B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Anne Spencer, Gwendolyn Bennett, Wallace Thurman, Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, and Aaron Douglas. Two short papers and a final exam. This course fulfills the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Dickenson and Whitman. Meets with American Culture 498.001.

Instructor(s): James H Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar we will read a generous selection of both these major nineteenth-century American poets in an historical and critical context. Since Emerson was an important influence on both Whitman and Dickinson, we'll spend a bit of time with him too. During the first three weeks we'll study poems from the 1855 and 1856 Leaves of Grass. Then, after a class on Emerson, we'll focus on Dickinson during the last three weeks before spring break, especially on her conception of the value of poetry and her struggles with her religious heritage. After the break, we'll return to the later Whitman of "Calamus," "Sea-Drift," and the Civil War poems, before finishing with three more weeks on Dickinson, focusing on her poems of death, pain, consolation, and immortality. Students will be asked to write a short paper on Whitman, a short paper on Dickinson, a longer (10-page) paper on a topic of their own choosing, and bi-weekly response papers.

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ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Gender And Queer Theory.

Instructor(s): Anne C Hermann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce students to the assumptions and permutations of gender and queer theory as a way to understand what difference they make to the reading of literary texts. Gender as the relationship between masculine and feminine and queer as the mismatch between sex, gender, and desire have informed questions from why has there been no female Shakespeare to what would it mean to "queer" a text? The class will distinguish between French and Anglo-American feminist understandings of language, gay and lesbian literary criticism, a queer canon, and queer readings of canonized literature. Likely texts are Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Toril Moi's Sexual/Textual Politics, and Annamarie Jagose's Queer Theory: An Introduction, as well as various literary theoretical approaches to a single text such as Toni Morrison's Sula or E.M. Forster's Maurice. Assignments include a short paper and a longer research paper in several stages. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 489 / Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001 Concurr Reg In 201-307-008.

Instructor(s): Lesley Ann Rex

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 489 / Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 002 Concurr Reg In 201-307-014.

Instructor(s): Anne Ruggles Gere

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 489 / Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 003 M A C Students Only.

Instructor(s): John L Stratman

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 The Poetry of Everyday Life. English Honors Students Only.

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How does poetry work in the world? In individual lives and careers? In community celebrations and social occasions? In citizens' movements? In classrooms and student life? To ask these questions is to begin to explore how inspiration works and for what ends. Course goals include: exploring how professional poets have used everyday speech and the everyday world; discovering how nonprofessional poets have composed poetry in diaries, letters, commonplace books, as well as for publication; investigating poetry as a form of public culture; working with community partners; doing original hands-on research. This project-based class is divided into four units. Each unit will introduce you to new material, new locations, new partners.

  • Unit I: Case Study in Literary History Poets Champion the "Real Language" of Work and Place.
  • Unit II: Discovering the Michigan Archive Researching the local poetry archive and making local cultural history accessible to the community.
  • Unit III: Arts of Citizenship Program/Poetry of Everyday Life Project Working with a 4th grade class to combine the exploration of a local site with the creation and presentation of poetry and art.
  • Unit IV: Public Eloquence-poetry as a "new public art." The class thus links historical and analytical readings with a community practicum.

    Requirements include attendance and participation, assigned readings, response papers, class presentations, creating a "poetry of everyday life" commonplace book, and a final project with an essay component.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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