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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English

This page was created at 10:44 AM on Sun, Mar 18, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for English.

What's New This Week in English.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

For a listing of the Fall 2001 courses that fulfill concentration requirements, please visit the English Dept. web site at: http://www.las.umich.edu/english/courses/

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department [(734) 764-6330].

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Compostion, students may elect English 225 for further practice in fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 and 425 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. You may take either fiction or poetry, or you may take English 227-Introduction to Playwriting. 223 is the prerequisite to the more advanced creative writing courses 323, 423 or 429. Admission to these advanced course is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY/INTERNSHIPS:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Fall Term 2001 is September 26, 2001.

Occasionally a student will have an opportunity to work with a compnay or institution as an intern. As a result, the English department has decided to offer their concentrators one academic credit for student internships. Applications will be considered and approved by the Undergraduate Director. You may pick up an application form in 3187 Angell Hall.

ENGLISH 239 & 240

239-What is Literature and, 240-Introduction to Poetry are the two prerequisite courses to the concentration in English. 223-Creative Writing is added when doing the subconcentration in Creative Writing. There are many program paths a student can choose in English, which include the subconcentration in Creative Writing(non-Honors,Honors), English and Education Certification, and Honors in English. For further information on these programs and program plans in English, contact a concentration advisor in English by calling the main office at: (734) 764-6330.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century - to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.

UPPER-LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT

Students enrolling in English courses that fulfill the Upper Level Writing Requirement for LSA must select the designation at registration. Please check the English Department's website to find courses listed as fulfilling the ULWR.


ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to develop our command of a specific writing situation, namely college-level writing about literature. Through workshops and group discussion, we clarify how writing about literature is like, and unlike, other sorts of writing that we practice in college and "real life." Our texts range widely, including at least one novel, lots of short stories, a play and a film. This array of literary genres has the simple appeal of novelty; but it also diversifies our interpretive challenges and vocabularies (for example, the critical vocabulary of fiction analysis differs from that of film analysis). Our goal is to rise to one classic definition of literature: to find both instruction and delight!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 033.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The intent of this course is to refine and improve college writing skills through reading, discussion, and written assignments. We will read selected essays and short stories. Students will be asked to write five short (3-4 pages) papers on assigned topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 034 Life-Stories

Instructor(s): Meier Joyce (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century autobiographies, asking: How does cultural and economic background inform life-stories? Where do writing and movement, and memory and place, intersect? How write of others who helped shape our lives? Evaluation will be based on class participation and course assignments: life-writing exercises, short reading responses, an interview, and a longer, autobiographical paper. We will read such works as N. Scott Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain, Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street, James McBride's The Color of Water, Mitch Albom's Tuesdays with Morrie, and Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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This page was created at 10:44 AM on Sun, Mar 18, 2001.


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