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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in Physics

This page was created at 10:35 AM on Sun, Mar 18, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Physics
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Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Physics.

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PHYSICS 106. Everyday Physics.

Section 001, 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines everyday phenomena and current technology in terms of physical concepts and laws. The subjects examined are wide ranging, and the discussion focuses on discovering common underlying themes. Examples of topics covered include: lasers, tornadoes, rainbows, computers, and satellites. This course emphasizes concepts rather than mathematical models. Grades are based on homework and exams. Curiosity is the major prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 106. Everyday Physics.

Section 003, 004.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines everyday phenomena and current technology in terms of physical concepts and laws. The subjects examined are wide ranging and the discussion focuses on discovering common underlying themes. Examples of topics covered include: lasers, tornadoes, rainbows, computers, and satellites. This course emphasizes concepts rather than mathematical models. Grades are based on homework and exams. Curiosity is the major prerequisite. Text: Conceptual Physics custom book 8th edition; Hewitt; Pearson Custom Publishing (Required).

Required Textbook:

  • Paul Hewitt, Conceptual Physics, Abridged 8th edition (Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., 1998)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 107. 20th Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: High school algebra and geometry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is intended for non-science concentrators who would like to learn about the two major revolutions that have both transformed twentieth-century physics and profoundly altered our perception of space, time, and matter; the special and general theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. No mathematical background beyond the high-school level is assumed.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 112. Cosmology: The Science of the Universe.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Although no science prerequisites are required, exposure to physics at high school level would be helpful. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

    First-Year Seminar,

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The majority of even college educated adults have only a modest understanding of our place in the universe at large. Most would be hard pressed to answer correctly such questions as: What else is there in the universe besides stars? Why do we think there was a big bang? How big is a galaxy and how might they have formed? This course will provide answers to such questions, stressing conceptual understanding and simple calculational problem solving. The format will be varied and informal. In addition to regular seminar attendance, students will likely be asked to perform small experiments and present at least one oral presentation. Essays and other written work will play a large role in the grade. Although no science prerequisites are required, exposure to physics at high school level would be helpful.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 125. General Physics: Mechanics and Sound.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. Phys. 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 140, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 125 and 126 constitute a two-term sequence offered primarily for students concentrating in the natural sciences, architecture, pharmacy, or natural resources; and for preprofessional students preparing for medicine, dentistry, or related health sciences. Physics 125 and 126 are an appropriate sequence for any student wanting a quantitative introduction to the basic principles of physics but without the mathematical sophistication of Physics 140 and 240. Strong emphasis is placed on problem solving, and skills in elementary algebra and trigonometry are assumed. While a high school level background in physics is not assumed, it is helpful. Physics 125 and 126 are not available by the Keller plan.

    Physics 125 covers classical mechanics (laws of motion, force, energy, and power) and mechanical wave motion (including sound waves). The final course grade is based on three one-hour evening examinations, class performance, and a final examination. Physics 127 should be taken concurrently.

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 127 Lab Concurrently With Physics 125.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 125. General Physics: Mechanics and Sound.

    Section 002.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. Phys. 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 140, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 125 and 126 constitute a two-term sequence offered primarily for students concentrating in the natural sciences, architecture, pharmacy, or natural resources; and for preprofessional students preparing for medicine, dentistry, or related health sciences. Physics 125 and 126 are an appropriate sequence for any student wanting a quantitative introduction to the basic principles of physics but without the mathematical sophistication of Physics 140 and 240. Strong emphasis is placed on problem solving, and skills in elementary algebra and trigonometry are assumed. While a high school level background in physics is not assumed, it is helpful. Physics 125 and 126 are not available by the Keller plan.

    Physics 125 covers classical mechanics (laws of motion, force, energy, and power) and mechanical wave motion (including sound waves). The final course grade is based on three one-hour evening examinations, class performance, and a final examination. Physics 127 should be taken concurrently.

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 127 Lab Concurrently With Physics 125.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 126. General Physics: Electricity and Light.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 125. Phys. 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 240 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Physics 125 for a general description of this introductory sequence of courses.

    Physics 126 is a continuation of Physics 125; it covers electricity and magnetism, the nature of light, and briefly introduces atomic and nuclear phenomena. The final course grade is based on three one-hour evening examinations, class performance, and a final examination. Texts: Physics with MCAT 5th edition; Cutnell Johnson; Wiley (Required). Physics Student Study Guide; Cutnell Johnson; Wiley (Recommended).

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 128 Lab Concurrently With Physics 126.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 126. General Physics: Electricity and Light.

    Section 002.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 125. Phys. 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 240 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    PHYSICS 127. Mechanics and Sound Lab.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with Phys. 125 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 141. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (1).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/default.htm

    No Description Provided

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    PHYSICS 128. Electricity and Light Lab.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with Phys. 126 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 241. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (1).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/default.htm

    No Description Provided

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    PHYSICS 140. General Physics I.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Phys. 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 140, 240, and 340 constitute a three-term sequence which examines concepts in physics fundamental to the physical sciences and engineering. This introductory sequence uses calculus, and, while it is possible to elect Physics 140 and Mathematics 115 concurrently, some students will find it more helpful to have started one of the regular mathematics sequences before electing Physics 140. The introductory sequence is primarily designed to develop a skill: the skill to solve simple problems by means of mathematics. Developing this skill requires daily practice and a sense for the meaning of statements and formulas, as well as awareness of when one understands a statement, proof, or problem solution and when one does not. Thus one learns to know what one knows in a disciplined way.

    Covers topics from classical mechanics including vectors, motion in one dimension, circular motion, projectile motion, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum of a particle, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, planetary motion, pressure and density of fluids, and Archimedes' principle. Evaluation is based on performance on three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 141 Lab Concurrently With Physics 140.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 140. General Physics I.

    Section 002.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Phys. 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 140, 240, and 340 constitute a three-term sequence which examines concepts in physics fundamental to the physical sciences and engineering. This introductory sequence uses calculus, and, while it is possible to elect Physics 140 and Mathematics 115 concurrently, some students will find it more helpful to have started one of the regular mathematics sequences before electing Physics 140. The introductory sequence is primarily designed to develop a skill: the skill to solve simple problems by means of mathematics. Developing this skill requires daily practice and a sense for the meaning of statements and formulas, as well as awareness of when one understands a statement, proof, or problem solution and when one does not. Thus one learns to know what one knows in a disciplined way.

    Covers topics from classical mechanics including vectors, motion in one dimension, circular motion, projectile motion, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum of a particle, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, planetary motion, pressure and density of fluids, and Archimedes' principle. Evaluation is based on performance on three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 141 Lab Concurrently With Physics 140.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 140. General Physics I.

    Section 003.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Phys. 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 140, 240, and 340 constitute a three-term sequence which examines concepts in physics fundamental to the physical sciences and engineering. This introductory sequence uses calculus, and, while it is possible to elect Physics 140 and Mathematics 115 concurrently, some students will find it more helpful to have started one of the regular mathematics sequences before electing Physics 140. The introductory sequence is primarily designed to develop a skill: the skill to solve simple problems by means of mathematics. Developing this skill requires daily practice and a sense for the meaning of statements and formulas, as well as awareness of when one understands a statement, proof, or problem solution and when one does not. Thus one learns to know what one knows in a disciplined way.

    Covers topics from classical mechanics including vectors, motion in one dimension, circular motion, projectile motion, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum of a particle, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, planetary motion, pressure and density of fluids, and Archimedes' principle. Evaluation is based on performance on three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of Physics 141 Lab Concurrently With Physics 140.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 140. General Physics I.

    Section 035, 036 Sect 035 & 036 Are Taught In The Keller Plan, Self-Paced, Individual Instruction. No Lectures. Students Should Elect One Sect Of Phys 141 Concurrent. Pick Up Info. In 2464 Randall Before Registering.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Phys. 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 145, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Self-Paced, Individualized Instruction. No Formal Lectures with These Sections. It is important That Students Pick Up An Information Sheet Describing the Format of Keller Plan Offerings in 2464 Randall. Students Should Elect One Section of Physics 141 Concurrently.

    Physics 140, 240, and 340 constitute a three-term sequence which examines concepts in physics fundamental to the physical sciences and engineering. This introductory sequence uses calculus, and, while it is possible to elect Physics 140 and Mathematics 115 concurrently, some students will find it more helpful to have started one of the regular mathematics sequences before electing Physics 140. The introductory sequence is primarily designed to develop a skill: the skill to solve simple problems by means of mathematics. Developing this skill requires daily practice and a sense for the meaning of statements and formulas, as well as awareness of when one understands a statement, proof, or problem solution and when one does not. Thus one learns to know what one knows in a disciplined way.

    Covers topics from classical mechanics including vectors, motion in one dimension, circular motion, projectile motion, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum of a particle, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, planetary motion, pressure and density of fluids, and Archimedes' principle.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 141. Elementary Laboratory I.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with Phys. 140, 160, or 145 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 127. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (1).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/default.htm

    No Description Provided

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    PHYSICS 160. Honors Physics I.

    Section 001 Phys 160 Is Designed For Honors, Phys Majors & Qualified Science Or Engin Majors. Students Need To Know Calculus Plus A Background In High School Phys. Students Should Elect One Sect Of Phys 141.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115. Students should elect Phys. 141 concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phys. 125, 140, or 145. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 160 Is Designed For Honors Students, Physics Majors, and Other Qualified Science Or Engineering Majors. Students must Elect One Section of Physics 141. Students Are Expected To Know Calculus and Have a Background In High School Physics.

    Physics 160 is a rigorous introduction to particle mechanics and the motion of extended objects. Particular topics include vectors, one- and two dimensional motion, conservation of laws, linear and rotational dynamics, gravitation, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics. Students should also elect a Physics 141 laboratory.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 240. General Physics II.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 140, 145 or 160; and Math. 116. Phys. 240 and 241 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 126 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Physics 140 for a general description of the introductory physics sequence.

    The topics covered in Physics 240 include classical electromagnetism: charge, Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart Law, Ampere's Law, Faraday's Law of induction, and simple AC circuits. There will be three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 240. General Physics II.

    Section 002.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 140, 145 or 160; and Math. 116. Phys. 240 and 241 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 126 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Physics 140 for a general description of the introductory physics sequence.

    The topics covered in Physics 240 include classical electromagnetism: charge, Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart Law, Ampere's Law, Faraday's Law of induction, and simple AC circuits. There will be three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 240. General Physics II.

    Section 003.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 140, 145 or 160; and Math. 116. Phys. 240 and 241 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 126 or 260. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Physics 140 for a general description of the introductory physics sequence.

    The topics covered in Physics 240 include classical electromagnetism: charge, Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart Law, Ampere's Law, Faraday's Law of induction, and simple AC circuits. There will be three evening examinations (see Time Schedule for dates and times) and a final examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 241. Elementary Laboratory II.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with Phys. 240 or 260 is strongly recommended. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 128. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (1).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/default.htm

    No Description Provided

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    PHYSICS 333. Keller Tutor 140.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). This is a graded course. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Students in this course serve as tutors for Physics 140 Keller sections. One to three credits may be earned while providing tutoring on a one-to-one basis under the supervision of the faculty member. Tutors are expected to spend three clock hours per week for each credit earned. Registration requires instructor approval; application forms are available in the Physics Office of Student Services, 2464 Randall Lab.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 340. Waves, Heat, and Light.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 240 or 260, and Math. 215. Concurrent election of Phys. 341 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is the third in a three-term introductory physics sequence, and is required of all physics concentrators. The topics covered in this course include thermodynamics, light and optics, and special relativity. The Wave equation is treated in detail. The class meets in lecture, with applications and demonstrations of the topics covered.

    GOALS: This course provides an introduction to Thermodynamics, Waves, Optics, and the Theory of Relativity. These topics, on the borderline between classical and modern physics, are essential for understanding a large fraction of physical phenomena. In addition to filling out your knowledge of classical physics topics that were not covered in earlier courses, you will be prepared for further study of more modern topics, both for Physics 390 (Modern Physics) and for 400 level courses. The class will meet as a lecture group.

    LAB: Those planning a physics major should also be enrolled in the lab course, Physics 341. The lab is also highly recommended for anyone who would like a "hands-on" understanding of the major topics covered in Physics 340.

    MATHEMATICS BACKGROUND: Calculus is required for this course and the official prerequisite is Math 215. This requirement can be waived by the permission of the instructor if you can demonstrate that you have the necessary background. The best way to know if you do is to see if you can do the Math Review for Physics 340.

    Grading Your course grade will be based on your performance on weekly homework problems, three "midterm" examinations, and a final examination. The relative weighting of each is:

    Homework problems 25%
    Exam #1 15%
    Exam #2 15%
    Exam #3 15%
    Final Exam 30%

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 341. Waves, Heat, and Light Lab.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 240 or 260. Concurrent election of Phys. 340 is strongly recommended. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (2).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Physics 341 is a laboratory course intended to accompany Physics 340 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. The experiments performed cover topics that include temperature measurement, black body radiation, optics, interference, diffraction, and the speed of light. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 390. Introduction to Modern Physics.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 340 and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a quantitative introduction to modern physics and includes a review of special relativity, the relationship of particles and waves, the Schrödinger equation applied to barrier problems, atomic structure and the interpretation of quantum numbers, the exclusion principle and its applications, structure of solids. This course includes a survey of the topics and techniques in several subfields of physics, including Solid State, Atomic, Nuclear, and Particle Physics. The class will meet as a lecture group. Applications of the principles will be considered in the lecture section on a regular basis.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 401. Intermediate Mechanics.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is required for physics concentrators. It presents a systematic development of Newtonian mechanics beginning with single particle motion in one dimension and extending through multiparticle systems moving in three dimensions. The conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum are emphasized. Lagrangian mechanics is introduced, and Hamiltonian mechanics may be introduced as well. Physical systems treated in detail include the forced damped-oscillator, inverse square forced orbits, harmonic motion in two dimensions, coupled oscillations and rigid body motion in two and three dimensions. Mathematical topics given extensive treatment include vector algebra, elements of vector calculus, ordinary differential equations, plane and spherical polar coordinates and phasors and/or complex numbers. Grades are based on one or two exams and a two-hour final.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 402. Light.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Topics studied cover the phenomena of physical optics, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization interpreted in terms of the wave theory of light. Several topics in modern optics will also be developed.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 405. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and Math. 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is a second course on the classical theory of electromagnetism. Familiarity with Maxwell's equations at the level of 240 is assumed. Physics 340 is strongly recommended. The course elaborates on the theoretical content of the Maxwell theory as well as practical application. Topics: review of vector analysis; electrostatic boundary value problems; magnetostatics; dielectric and magnetic materials; Maxwell's equations and electrodynamics; the wave equation, electromagnetic waves in free space, waves in conducting and dielectric media; guided waves; electromagnetic radiation; sources of EM radiation.

    This course provides a rigorous introduction to electricity and magnetism, suitable for junior-year physics majors or engineering students. The subjects covered during the first part of the course will be, in the listed order, static electric fields in the vacuum, static electric fields in matter, and static magnetic fields in vacuum and matter. We will continue with a discussion of time-dependent phenomena, including electromagnetic induction, that will lead us to the complete set of Maxwell's equations and some of their solutions. The prerequisites are Physics 126/128 or Physics 240/241, and Math 216. Physics 340 is recommended.

    Textbook: D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd Ed., (Prentice Hall, 1999). ISBN 0-13-805326-X.. Supplementary: R. H. Hood, Classical Electromagnetism, HBC Publishers. The level of this book is a little below Griffiths, but it is sufficient for the course. The book uses SI units and contains a floppy disc. Supplementary: J. D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics, John Wiley & Sons. This book is on the level of a graduate course and uses Gaussian units.

    Reading assignments, which are part of the homework, may complement the material covered in class.

    Homework: Homework problems will be assigned once per week, and will be due one week from when they are assigned. The homework will be collected, and all or a part of it will be graded. The homework will contribute 30 percent towards the final course grade.

    Examinations: There will be two "midterm" examinations and a comprehensive final exam at the end of the course.

    Course Grading: Your course grade will be based on the total number of points earned on the midterm examination, the final examination, and on the graded homework problems. The relative weighting is determined as follows:
    Midterm Exams weight 20% each
    Final Exam weight 30%
    Homework weight 30%

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 413 / Complex Systems 541. Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics and the Physics of Complexity.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 401. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is intended to introduce the study of a variety of nonlinear-dynamical and complex systems at an undergraduate level. It should be useful to students in engineering, mathematics, or one of the sciences. The topics covered will provide an introduction to nonlinear, complex, and disordered systems, emphasizing its concepts, ideas, and some applications. Nonlinearities and disorder often produce complex behavior, and they will be two central themes underlying the course material. Most of the course will focus on basic tools of dynamical systems to study nonlinear differential and difference equations (including bifurcation theory, numerical algorithms, chaos, fractals; with many examples and applications). At the end, we will discuss some current-research issues in spatio-temporal dynamics, collecting transport in disorder systems, instabilities, and avalanches in a variety of systems. This course will emphasize the effective use of computers in science, including interactive graphics and several useful numerical techniques. Computers can be used as a discovery tool to explore new ideas, and students will be encouraged to do so. The Science Learning Center provides the software and books needed to do most of the homeworks. Grading is based on homeworks and two exams. Texts: (Recommended) S.H. Strogatz, Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, with Applications to Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and Engineering (Addison-Wesley, 1994 J.H. Hubbard and B.H. West, Differential Equations: A Dynamical Systems Approach (part I and II) (Springer-Verlag, 1991 and 1995).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 435. Gravitational Physics.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 390 and 401. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The Einstein theory of general relativity provides the foundation of gravitational physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. After an introduction to the theory, experimental tests of general relativity which were performed in the past, the implications of pulsars, black holes, supernovae, and cosmic background radiation as well as the ongoing experimental detection of gravitational waves are discussed. This is an elective course for concentrators in physical sciences. Regular exams as for any elective course in physics are given.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 441. Advanced Laboratory I.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 390 and any 400-level Physics course. (2). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (2).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered, each covering a fundamental physics concept. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instructor. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics. Examples of experiments include the photo-electric effect, electron charge/mass ratio, X-ray diffraction, muon lifetime, nuclear magnetic resonance, high Tc superconductors, chaos, and electron microscope imaging. Physics 441 is offered Fall Term and Physics 442 is offered Winter Term. Physics concentrators are required to take both terms and perform different experiments in the two courses.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 451. Methods of Theoretical Physics I.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 215 and 216. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This is a course in the mathematical methods used in physics and is considered necessary preparation for graduate school. Among the topics treated are orthogonal functions and vector spaces, complex variables, differential equations and their special functions, Fourier series, and aspects of group theory.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 453. Quantum Mechanics.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 390. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course begins with an overview of the experimental and theoretical foundations for quantum mechanics. The theory is developed and applied to simple physical systems, with examples taken from atomic, molecular, condensed matter, nuclear, and particle physics. Topics include: basics of the Schrödinger equations and its solutions in rectangular and spherical coordinates; properties, uses, and interpretations of state functions; expectation values and physical observables; coherence, correlation, and interference. Other topics include spin, the exclusion principle, and some quantum statistical mechanics.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 496. Senior Thesis, I.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Students get introductory experience and research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a senior thesis project. If work is not completed in the Winter Academic Term, student would register for 497 in the Winter Term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 497. Senior Thesis, II.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A continuation of Physics 496. Students who do not complete their thesis research in Physics 496 may continue to 497. If continuing, a grade of Y is given for Physics 496 and a final senior thesis grade is given upon completion of the research.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 498. Introduction to Research for Honors Students.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Honors students get introductory experience with research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a thesis used to satisfy that part of the Honors requirement. If work is not completed in Fall Term, the student would register for 499 in Winter Term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHYSICS 499. Introduction to Research for Honors Students.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of physics concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Honors students get introductory experience with research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a thesis used to satisfy the part of the Honors requirement.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Graduate Course Listings for PHYSICS.


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