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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies


This page was created at 7:40 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ACABS 100 / AAPTIS 100 / HJCS 100 / HISTORY 132. Peoples of the Middle East.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 101. Elementary Classical Hebrew I.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this and the complementary course, 102 Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (Winter Term), is to equip the beginning student with the tools necessary for reading the Hebrew Bible. The course will introduce students to the grammar of biblical Hebrew; its phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the study of word formation), and syntax (the study of phrase and sentence formation). In addition to mastering the grammar, students will need to acquire a sizable working vocabulary of the language, for competency in grammar and lexicon best facilitates the goal of reading the biblical text. The grading will be based on corrected daily assignments (i.e., the exercises), 13-14 announced quizzes (one class day advance notice), a final comprehensive exam, as well as attendance and participation. The daily assignments will comprise 25% of the grade, the ten-best quizzes 25%, the final exam 25%, and attendance and participation 25%.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 200 / AAPTIS 200 / HJCS 200 / RELIGION 201. Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001 Religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu), Sherman Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu), Yaron Z Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/religion/201/001.nsf

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 201. Intermediate Classical Hebrew, I.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 601.001.

Instructor(s): Charles R Krahmalkov (crkrah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 102. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the literature of the Hebrew Bible. Texts representing different literary genres and dating from different periods will be read in the original. Students will be introduced to the history of the text of the Hebrew Bible and the problems of its translation and interpretation. Special emphasis will be placed on refining the student's knowledge of Biblical Hebrew through the study of Hebrew syntax. Required books are (1) a copy of the Biblical Hebraica, and (2) a proper dictionary of classical Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 266. Before the Bible: The Phoenicians.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Culture Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles R Krahmalkov (crkrah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to the religion, mythology, and culture of the Phoenicians the ancient inhabitants of the cities of Palestine, Lebanon, and the Transjordan in the pre-biblical and biblical periods. The religion of Israel, from which Judaism and Christianity descend, was historically a reformation of Phoenician religion. Students will be introduced to the gods of the Phoenicians and the rich mythology in which they figure. They will learn about the power of faith, the institutions of Phoenician religion, including the cult of infant sacrifice. Students will also learn about Phoenician values, such as public service, about Phoenician maritime activity, such as the circumnavigation of Africa, and about the role of the Phoenicians in teaching the alphabet to the world. Examinations will be a midterm and final. There also will be a 10-page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 292. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Race & Ethnicity in Ancient Mesopotamia. Meets with Honors 250.005.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Alan Emberling (gepffe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Who were "the Sumerians"? The southern region of ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq and Syria) was known as Sumer, and its inhabitants spoke a language called Sumerian. In about 3500 B.C., the world's first large cities developed in Mesopotamia, and soon after, the earliest written documents recorded in the Sumerian language. While Sumerian culture developed in the south, people speaking a language known as Akkadian gradually built cities in northern Mesopotamia, and one Akkadian dynasty eventually succeeded in conquering most of the region by about 2200 B.C. After the collapse of this Akkadian empire, Sumerian rulers gained control of large territories in what has been called a Sumerian renaissance. This history has led many scholars to suggest that the world's earliest civilization was built on ethnic conflict.

In this course, we will use a cross-cultural perspective on ethnicity to understand cultural identity in ancient Mesopotamia. The course begins with readings and discussion focused on key terms - race, ethnicity, culture, state, and nation. We will then survey archaeological remains and historical records from 3500-2000 B.C., including the temple precinct of Uruk, the Royal Cemetery of Ur, and the burned Palace of Ebla; monuments of royal and popular art including stelae and sculpture; and cuneiform tablets that preserve some of the world's earliest literature. Finally, we will critically assess the merits of scholarly perspectives on race and ethnicity in Mesopotamia.

This will be a lecture course with regular discussion. Students will be asked to present summaries of key articles or ancient sources as well as a final research paper. Course Requirements: class participation, in-class summaries and a research paper (15-20 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 307 / GREEK 307. The Synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke.

Courses in Greek

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Verhoogt (verhoogt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GREEK 102; and permission of instructor. Taught in Greek. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Greek 307.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 322 / HISTORY 307 / RELIGION 359. History and Religion of Ancient Judaism.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Culture Courses

Section 001 Meets with JUDAIC 317.001.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May be elected independently of ACABS 321. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course covers the history and religion of ancient Judaism from the Babylonian exile (6th century BCE) to the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism (3rd century CE). The liveliness of the period is testified by its many names. For the Jew, it is the "Second Temple Period" the cradle of Jewish civilization. For the Christian, it is the "intertestamental period" between the Old and the New Testament the age in which Jesus was born and the Church arose. For the historian, it is all that and much more. It was an age of great conflicts, in which the Jewish people had to face powerful neighbors and rulers: the Egyptians and the Babylonians, the Persians, the Greeks, and the Romans. But it was also an age of great creativeness, in which different varieties of Judaism (including the early Christian movement) developed sophisticated and lasting theologies and restlessly struggled for supremacy or simply survival. No prerequisites. Course grade is based on attendance and daily readings of primary sources, midterm, final and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 395. Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings.

General ACABS

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 485. Introduction to Middle Egyptian, I.

Ancient Egypt: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Martin Fisher (djoser@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A basic introduction to Egyptian hieroglyphics and Middle Egyptian, the classical form of the ancient Egyptian language. We will use James Allen's text, Middle Egyptian: An Introductin to the language and culture of hieroglyphs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 488(NES 486) / ANTHRCUL 486. Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Culture

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Alan Emberling (geoffe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/acabs/488/001.nsf

Ancient Mesopotamia the area between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, in modern Iraq, Syria, and Turkey was one of the world's first large civilizations. This course traces the development of Mesopotamia from the small scale farming villages of the Neolithic (7500 BC) to the fall of the last native dynasty in Babylon in 538 BC. It takes an archaeological approach that uses material remains to understand how Mesopotamian economies and political systems operated, what social groups and statuses existed within society, and what ideologies guided them. We will look at ceramics and small figurines; sculpture in stone and precious metals; forms of burial; the architecture of houses, palaces, and temples; the layout of cities; the distribution of settlements across the landscape; and their use of plant, animal, and mineral resources. We will also consult the cuneiform textual record. Course requirements: two midterm exams, one final exam, and one term paper. Exams will be in-class for undergraduates, take-home for graduate students. Term paper will be 10-page minimum for undergraduates, 20-page minimum for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 491. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Canaan and Egypt in Ancient Times.

Instructor(s): Ellen Morris (morrisel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~morrisel

This course explores the long and checkered history of Egypto-Canaanite relations, from the advent of settled life to the onslaught of Nebuchadnezzar's armies. The geographic region referred to in antiquity as Canaan shares roughly similar boundaries with those claimed by modern Israel, and -as today- Egyptian influence in the region was pivotal. On the one hand, Egypt and Canaan frequently maintained a tenuous balance of power, with weakness in one inviting exploitation by the other. Conversely, shared economic interests and family ties also often served to integrate the two populations. While Egypto-Canaanite interactions are frequently approached from a biblical perspective, this course will place a heavy emphasis upon the excavated material culture of Canaan and also upon that of the comparatively lesser-known Egyptian Delta. Over the span of the academic term we'll investigate Egyptian fortresses and temples in Canaan, Canaanite trading emporiums and warrior graves in Egypt, and many other archaeological sites as well. Issues such as the construction of ethnic identity and the mechanics of interregional trade will be addressed, and specific classes will also tackle topics of special interest such as the Amarna archive, the Exodus narrative, and ancient "orientalism."

If you have any questions, please contact the professor: Ellen Morris (morrisel@umich.edu). No prerequisites are required, and undergraduates of all levels are strongly encouraged to enroll.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 511. Introduction to Sumerian.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicole M Brisch

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/acabs/511/001.nsf

This course will provide an introduction to Sumerian, the earliest written language in the world. The main focus will be on the grammar, primarily morphology, and on the structure of the cuneiform writing system. Simple texts will be read in class and analyzed. In addition, the course will provide basic information on the history and culture of early Mesopotamia. A basic knowledge of the cuneiform script is required, but interested beginners should contact the instructor. The one book that students will need is Marie-Louise Thomsen, The Sumerian Language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 585. Advanced Middle Egyptian.

Ancient Egypt: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry G Wilfong (twilfong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 486. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended as a continuation to the introduction sequence of ACABS 485-486, students in this course further their knowledge of Middle Egyptian beyond the first year through study of a variety of texts in this language. Students will read a selection of texts in Middle Egyptian, from modern transcriptions and facsimiles of the ancient originals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 587. Seminar in Ancient Egyptian History and Culture: Selected Topics.

Ancient Egypt: Culture Courses

Section 001 Individual and Society. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 281 or 382. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The writing of ancient Egyptian social history, and the ways in which this history is materially displayed in museum exhibitions, has been shaped both by the evidence of ancient Egyptian art, text, material culture, and archaeological landscapes; and by the intellectual baggage and collecting practices of scholars who have studied this ancient culture. In this seminar, taught in conjunction with the developing exhibition "Individual and society in ancient Egypt" at the Kelsey Museum, we will explore the concepts and evidence for identities and individuals; boundaries and communication; landscape; and the philosophy and practice of museum collections and exhibitions. Students will undertake individual and group research projects addressing the different ways in which we track different kinds of individuals in the past through domestic contexts; mortuary behavior; votives, pilgrimages and tourism; and movement in other conceptual landscapes. Students will all actively participate in applying this research to the planning and execution of the exhibition, experiencing first hand the museum context and process. Requirements: attendance, participation, presentations, and final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 592. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Christian & Rabbinic Origins.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Judaic and Christian studies are gradually converging toward a more comprehensive and inclusive approach to the period of Judaism between 300 BCE and 200 CE. The concept of "late" monolithic Judaism, which constituted the background of the one Christianity, has been lately replaced by the view of an "early" pluralistic period that was both the beginning of a new stage in the inner evolution of Judaism and the first, or "Jewish," phase of Christianity. Now, the period is turning into something even more complex: the historical setting of many rival contemporaneous Judaisms (including early Christianity). With the varieties of its ideological systems, middle Judaism marks the passage from ancient Judaism to the distinct existence of the two major branches of modern Judaism: Christianity and Rabbinism. The goal of the modern interpreter is no longer the identification and synchronic study of the one Judaism as witnessed by the Jewish sources of the time, nor the identification and diachronic study of an overlapping phase in the evolution of Jewish and Christian religions. The object of a history of middle Judaic thought is the identification and diachronic study of many parallel Judaisms (including early Christianity) in themselves and in the context of their complex synchronic relationships.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 592. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 002 Hittite Readings.

Instructor(s): Gary Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ACABS.


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