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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 7:41 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


AMCULT 100. What is an American?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente M Diaz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the question about Americaness through critical studies of American Popular Culture. Subjects include sports, food, music, and malls.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Women's History/Women's Words. Meets with HIST 196.004, WOMENSTD 151.002.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 196.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 002 U.S. Environmental History. Meets with History 196.001

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria (pdeloria@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/196/001.nsf

See History 196.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 003 Caribbean and its Diaspora. Meets with History 196.005.

Instructor(s): Hoffnung-Garskof

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 002 Facing American Manhood. Meets with Women's Studies 150.002.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/103/002.nsf

This course explores literary, visual, and theoretical representations of American masculinity in twentieth-century American culture. We will examine various formations of American manhood, starting with Henry Adams' the last Puritan vision of the nation and Abraham Cahan's depictions of immigrant imported bridegrooms. We will discuss Ernest Hemingway's stories about white men in Africa, Tennessee Williams' acclaimed play on ambivalences of desire in New Orleans, and James Baldwin's examinations of race and sexuality across the Atlantic. We will also look at Jerzy Kosinski's satire on pop culture TV heroism, David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, and Sherman Alexie's reassessment of the Native American at the millennial juncture.

We will meet once a week for a three-hour session, which will include a lecture, general discussion, and group projects/exercises. The course is student-centered and will rely on your active participation and input; you will produce reading responses and take part in individual and group presentations. Literary and theoretical texts, visual material, and several films will serve as springboards for these activities. You will be expected to work creatively and independently, as well as in a team, and are encouraged to bring relevant visual and literary material to class as part of your contribution/participation.

Requirements include attendance, active and intelligent participation in class and group projects, and willingness to be challenged by new concepts and ideas. There can be unscheduled quizzes on the reading assignments; there will be a comprehensive midterm exam, and final paper. You are expected to be a scholar in this course, that is, a lot of your work, thinking, and preparation for our meetings will happen outside of the classroom, on your own time, according to your own critical skills, and as a result of your own creativity.

You will receive grades for:

  • participation,
  • group presentations (3-4 students will work together on a project which must include visual and/or spatial elements/representations related to the readings; the project will be collectively presented to class to incite discussion; one grade for all students),
  • midterm exam (30 min, in-class, comprehensive),
  • final paper (10-15 pages max with notes and bibliography).

Primary texts:

  1. Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams
  2. Abraham Cahan, Yekl and the Imported Bridegroom
  3. Ernest Hemingway, Short Stories
  4. Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire
  5. James Baldwin, Going to Meet the Man
  6. Jerzy Kosinski, Being There
  7. Michael Kimmel and Amy Aronson, eds. The Gendered Society Reader
  8. R.W. Connell, Masculinities
  9. Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven
  10. David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly.

Films:

  • Ethnic Notions,
  • Doctor Strangelove,
  • Being There,
  • Lone Star.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 AIDS in America.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/206/001.nsf

The American response to the AIDS epidemic is inherently important and also provides a window into aspects of our values and culture. These involve the place in our social world of class differences, sexuality, gender and sexual orientation; scientific and medical knowledge and alternatives to mainstream approaches to health; poverty; homelessness; health care systems, disease prevention, pharmaceuticals, and the economics of all of these fields; privacy rights; incarceration and prison health-care systems; racial and cultural diversity; law and the legal system; artistic responses to a social crisis; public health; and policy issues in all of these fields.

This course will be an interdisciplinary exploration of all of these phenomena as they bear on the AIDS crisis. There will be a particular emphasis on keeping up-to-date on current developments and on understanding them in the context of the history of the epidemic. Some field work--a practicum experience--will involve students in parts of the community where the impacts of the epidemic may be observed and engaged. In this part of the course you might, for example, do volunteer work at the HIV/AIDS Resource Center, at the University Hospital, or elsewhere in the community.

Scientific knowledge of HIV/AIDS--presented for a nonscientific audience--will be a required part of the course curriculum. Other parts of the course will involve studying research results in the social sciences and engaging with artistic work--memoirs, fiction, film, poetry, fine arts, music--concerning AIDS. A major assignment will involve work with primary archived materials at the Bentley Library Historical Library, an important research institution on North Campus. It will thus be

Although the focus of the course is AIDS and America, the global nature of the AIDS epidemic will be studied. This will provide a context for AIDS in America, and it is also important in itself. Special attention will be given, in this part of the course, to AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. We will follow the migration of AIDS into poor and minority communities in the U.S., into the population of women around the world, and into its current status as a global pandemic. Each student will do a project that will culminate in a class presentation. These projects and presentations will be scheduled for the early and middle portions of the semester, so that the entire class can profit from the full range of interests and talents of its members.

The methods of teaching and learning in this course will include discussions, a few lectures, projects, short and long written assignments, films, presentations by guest speakers, and experiential learning in the community. They will also include extensive use of computer-based communications. Students must be proficient, or willing to become proficient, in Web browsing, email, word-processing, and computer-based discussion. Some assignments will involve listening to audio files on the Web, so students must be willing to configure their computers appropriately or use a computer at a public site that is so configured. This CourseTools Web site will be a gateway to important materials and class communications. Students must have computers with Internet access or be willing to use public computer terminals on a daily basis.

For grading purposes, learning will be judged with reference to participation and attendance, written work, class presentations, weekly on-line quizzes, and the completion of assignments. The actual grading system will be defined at the beginning of the semester in consultation with class members. A definitive statement of the grading system will then be posted on this Web site in an announcement called "Grades."

All written assignments must be submitted electronically, either from this Web site or as an attachment to an email. Each assignment will give instructions for how the computer file should be named and submitted. It is important to follow those instructions so that the instructor may save your submissions in an orderly way. It is not acceptable to hand-in hard copies.

Once deadlines are established for the term, there will be very little flexibility concerning when work must be completed. Deadlines are landmarks in a learning experience that is designed to be steady and continuous throughout the semester. The learning exprience is damaged by not meeting deadlines. Start all assignments early so that unexpected contingencies do not prevent you from completing them on time. Anticipate busy times of the semester--periods when assignments are due in a number of your classes--by getting an early start. Back-up all computer files regularly so that you don't lose your work because of computer failures.

All materials for reading assignments will be found on the Web. Some field work may involve travel costs, and there may be admission fees to films and performances.

There will be weekly quizzes but no midterm or final exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 002 READING CULTURE, READING BOOKS.

Instructor(s): MARY C. KELLEY

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Jane adores Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. Dick wouldn't be caught with the novel in his hand. He goes to the shelf with the Hardy Boys. A cliché, yes, but one that reveals the degree to which our tastes are shaped by the social and cultural circumstances in which we read a book.

We all read, sometimes to command a subject, sometimes to take imaginative journeys. Typically, we do not think of ourselves as historically situated readers who are observing conventions about what is legitimate reading, what crosses boundaries into transgression. In this seminar, we will concern ourselves with what people read, how they read it, and what meanings they derive for their personal and social lives. Our inquiry will engage fundamental issues about gender and identity, individuality and community, artifacts and meaning, ideology and power. It encompasses all the world that can be inscribed on paper in word and image, to be decoded by others according to conventions we are only beginning to discern.

We will examine how the book as physical artifact shapes the ways in which we read. We will investigate representations of reading in various historical contexts and the cultural prescriptions they convey. We will survey numerous sources for evidence on the practices and preferences of actual readers. We will also address current debates in the history of the book, the relationship between elite and popular cultures, the intersection between gender and reading, and the issue of agency for readers as well as authors and publishers. In engaging all these debates, we will ask ourselves who makes a text?

This course is particularly relevant to undergraduates concentrating in American Culture, Women's Studies, History, and English. Students interested in this course should be sure to go to the first class meeting on Thursday, September 12, or by the second class meeting on Tuesday, September 17. It is open to enrollment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 212. Introduction to Latino Studies Social Science.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samiri Hernandez Hiraldo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 214. Introduction to Asian American Studies Social Science.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phillip D Akutsu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/214/001.nsf

This course examines the long and diverse history and experiences of Asian Americans in the United States. Migrqating first from Asia in the late-1700s, Asian Americans provide a critical contribution to U.S. history, culture, and society. Despite this fact, Asian Americans continue to be seen as "foreigners" in the U.S. This course will review and analyze the Asian American experience in the U.S. from the mid-19th century to the present. Course content will cover Asian American contributions to historical, political, and sociocultural developments in the U.S.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, introductions, table talk, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of American Culture 222.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/womenstd/240/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 243 / WOMENSTD 243. Introduction to Study of Latinas in the U.S.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Halperin (mcotera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will serve to introduce the study of gender, culture, and identity among Latinas in the U.S. We will grapple with the cultural forces that have historically created and re-created Latina identities, as well as discuss issues of self-representation as Latinas seize interpretative power in the arena of culture. Thus, one of the goals of this course is to understand larger cultural forces that impact Latinas' understanding of themselves in society while also stressing their power as cultural agents. The second goal of the course is to further enhance the conceptual development of Latina/Latino Studies that weaves together the experiences of Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Mexican Americans. In this course we will begin to complicate this vision of Latina/Latino Studies by noting the increased presence of South and Central American women in the United States. Prerequisities: None

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 262. Introductory Study of Native Religious Traditions.

Native American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While there is widespread interest among many non-Natives about the religious traditions of indigenous people, Native communities are becoming increasingly hostile toward non-Natives who seek knowledge about Native spirituality. This course will introduce students to the issues and controversies surrounding the study of Native religious traditions and will prepare them for further study of Native religions in a manner that is sensitive to the needs and concerns of Native communities. Issues to be covered include the relationship between the Christianization and colonization of Native communities, spiritual appropriation, spirituality and political activism, Native religions and public policy, and contemporary debates surrounding Native religious identity. This course will provide a foundation for students who wish to pursue in depth studies of indigenous religious traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 APA Women & Performance. (3 Credits). Meets with Women's Studies 342.001.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We will examine various theories and methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We will also explore issues to consider, such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator," legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories. Students will learn different strategies of how to prepare for, conduct, and process an oral history interview; how to develop an interview question guide, how to do background research, how to phrase questions to get the most out of an interview, and what type of equipment choices one has. Towards the latter half of the course, we will cover post-interview processing, including: transcribing, editing, indexing, and presenting. Students are expected to facilitate and participate in class discussions, and complete assignments that lead to a final project (i.e., conducting, transcribing, reading, work- shopping, processing, documenting, and presenting an oral history of a woman). By doing so, we will attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local community, adding to the oral history research available on women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 New York Modern: Great Metropolis. (3 credits). Meets with History 393.001

Instructor(s): Jay W Cook

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 393.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 Hollywood Film Industry. (4 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will study how an idealized model of American national identity got established, questioned by the Hollywood film industry between (roughly) 1930 and 1980. The Hollywood studio film was distinguished by its ability to project images of normative Americans and to undercut those notions; in Hollywood, threats and alternatives to that identity were constructed, undermined, and remade sometimes in the very same film. We'll witness how films like Stagecoach, Scarface, It's a Wonderful Life, Shadow of a Doubt postulate models of Americans and/or the threat to it; then we'll see how more recent films like The Godfather, Chinatown, and Unforgiven extend this process by challenging the rules by which these genres work. We'll also witness Hollywood's treatment of such issues as race, immigration, sexuality, and the family and test the Hollywood version against acts of literary imagination, historical analysis, sociological inquiry. Requirements: journals; one paper; midterm; and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 005 History of the Pacific. (3 Credits). Meets with History 302.002.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 302.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 006 Native American Feminism. (3 Credits). Meets with Women's Studies 241.001

Instructor(s): Andrea Lee Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce themes in contemporary Native American feminism. We will look at the development of Native feminist thought and its relationship both to Native land-based struggles and non-Native feminist movements. Particular issues we will focus on include: sexual/domestic violence; environmentalism; incarceration; the politics of motherhood; women's health; and religion/spirituality.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 007 Photography: the Photo Essay. (3 Credits). Meets with Art 362.001.

Instructor(s): Joanne Leonard (joannell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/301/007.nsf

This course will offer students an approach to thinking about and using photographs in sequence and photographs with text in constructing blended narratives. Students come from LSA and The School of Art and Design. Students will complete approximately 6 photo assignments in the term, each designed to explore various critical and theoretical frameworks related to The Photo Essay in historical and contemporary usage. Students must own an adjustable still photographic camera, any format (35mm, 2 1/4, or 4 x 5). Black and white photographic materials are stressed, and darkrooms for black and white work are available for students of this class. Basic photo knowledge is desirable, but every effort will be made to support LSA students with less photo experience than the art students in the class. Students may work in color if they are involved in a color photo class at the School of Art or otherwise have means of color processing and pr inting available to them. Digital and medium format cameras will be introduced. Classes meet twice a week for three hours each meeting. Some classes are lecture, demonstration, discussion, and/or critique. Other class meeting times will be used for in-class lab time. There are readings required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 APA Leadership. (4 Credits)

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine strategies for building communities and developing leadership skills through practice. This term, the course focuses on the Asian Pacific American community at Michigan. The major component of the course is that each student is required to spend some time each week working in an APA campus or community-based organization. Everyone is encouraged to share their experiences in class discussions and collaborate on like-minded projects or programs. This will be supplemented with course readings, exercises, guest speakers, and films. For the final project, students will work together on a public program that educates and empowers the community. This is an optional/optimal 2-term course, continuing from Fall 2001. Enrollment is by Permission of Instructor Only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor 1

AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 APA & Public Policy.

Instructor(s): Paul Wong (paulwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/310/001.nsf

Course description In this course, we will critically examine a number of social and public policy issues that affect Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. These issues include, for example, race relations, immigration, education, employment, civil rights, entrepreneurship, health/mental health, economic status, and community development.

We will read and discuss research articles that deal with the background and development of these issues. We will formulate and debate our positions on these issues, as well as consider what strategies and actions should be taken in addressing these issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Filipino American Experience.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an upper-division interdisciplinary course on the experience of Filipinos in America. We will examine Filipina Americans' role in historical events, contemporary issues, and how these affect community formation and life in America. By looking at the different waves of Filipina/o migration to the U.S., we will see the Pinoy & Pinay experience in various regions and sectors of American society: education, labor, family, politics, and communities, to name a few. We will also determine how Filipina/o American issues are reflected through historical, sociological, psychological, autobiographical, and literary texts, answering such questions as: Who/What is a Filipino American? What makes the Filipino's experience in America unique from that of other Asian Pacific Americans? How does the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality affect Filipina/os? How are Filipino Americans "positioned" in the society? What are some of the current issues facing Filipinos? How do cultural spaces create strategies of resistance? What roles have Filipina/os played in civil rights and social activism? Overall, how have Filipino Americans strategized their changing places within this society? As we examine these issues, we will also attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local Filipina/o American community. Students will launch a new UM project of collecting oral histories of Filipinos of Michigan, with a special emphasis on the Detroit area.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 313 / ANTHRCUL 314. Cuba and its Diaspora.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001 A weekly two hour film screening is required, Monday 4-6pm or 6-8pm.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/314/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 316 / ANTHRCUL 315. Native American Peoples of North America.

Native American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerald L Carr (glcarr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/315/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 315.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 319 / PSYCH 319. Empowering Families and Communities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 320. (3). (Excl). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 319.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 320 / PSYCH 320. Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 319. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 320.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 324 / ENGLISH 381. Asian American Literature.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 381.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 327 / ENGLISH 387. Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001 Imagining Mexicanness.

Instructor(s): Maria Sanchez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 387.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 328 / ENGLISH 382. Native American Literature.

Native American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 335. Arts and Culture in American Life.

Section 001 Meets with History 393.003.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An advanced introduction to the arts in 20th-century U.S. cultural history, this course will establish the late nineteenth-century context and then survey some key topics in twentieth-century American artistic life and popular culture. Special emphasis will be placed on black/white relations in the arts, the politics of culture in the first half of the 20th century, and the shifting meanings of modernism and postmodernism. We will approach these themes especially through developments in music, literature, art, and film. The multidisciplinary perspective developed here will introduce students to the comparative interpretation of a spectrum of cultural phenomena --including the high modernist poetry of T.S. Eliot, Duke Ellington's jazz music, Hollywood comedy during the Great Depression, Zora Neale Hurston's Harlem Renaissance literature, Jackson Pollock's abstract expressionist painting, the soul music of Aretha Franklin, and the postmodernist ideas lurking within popular films like "The Matrix"-- as sites of historical inquiry. The course will explore how the elite art practices and discourses of modernism and postmodernism developed not in an isolated vacuum but rather as symbiotic responses to the everchanging commercialization of cultural life and ordinary leisure. Therefore, the rise and transformation of mass culture will be of particular interest. As the course moves up to the present time, we will emphasize how the multiple worlds of popular music continue to serve as battlegrounds over the representation of gender roles, cultural identity, and racial and ethnic diversity. The format will be two lectures per week plus a required discussion section. There will also be several required film screenings outside of class. Requirements should include attendance, midterm and final exam, brief written commentaries, and periodic reading quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 342 / HISTORY 368 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 345. American Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/345/001.nsf

I always know when I am in America because there is a sense of struggle and energy, the energy of possibility, the energy of improvement and ascension. The struggle with the great uglinesses of our past. All the people we have degraded and lied to right here on these plains. How much unnecessary blood was spilled. In Alabama, Georgia, my beloved Louisiana. How much human potential destroyed because it came in a brown package. How many lies told and retold and how it diminished the quality of our national life. How much glory and heroism and saving of lives and celebration of freedom has sweetened our national history. Living in this tension makes me feel American and modern. --Wynton Marsalis
Jazz in the Bittersweet Blues of Life, p. 236
Wynton Marsalis and Carl Vigeland
De Capo Press, 2001

As Marsalis says, our national life has contained both ugliness and glory. This course will explore the interaction of politics and society in America, struggling to keep both aspects in view.

We will look closely at major social issues in contemporary America and the manner in which they are treated in the political arena. The issues and the political debates will be approached through a variety of disciplines. We will strive to understand underlying questions of race, gender, ethnicity, and class. The basic goal is to understand the relationship between politics--the distribution and exercise of power--and the shape of our society.

Examples: terrorism, foreign policy, civil liberties in the context of the first anniversary of the events of 9/11; the elections of 2002; corporate ethics; media and politics; contemporary immigration; dealing with historical evils-- collective guilt, reparations; alcohol and tobacco in American life; sports and athletics in our society; American politics in American songs; economic mobility and inequality in the distribution of wealth; the abuse of cihldren and other vulnerable people.

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The methods of teaching and learning in this course will include discussions, a few lectures, projects, short and long written assignments, films, presentations by guest speakers, and experiential learning in the community. They will also include extensive use of computer-based communications. Students must be proficient, or willing to become proficient, in Web browsing, email, word-processing, and computer-based discussion. Some assignments may involve listening to audio files on the Web, so students must be willing to configure their computers appropriately or use a computer at a public site that is so configured. This CourseTools Web site will be a gateway to important materials and class communications. Students must have computers with Internet access or be willing to use public computer terminals on a daily basis.

For grading purposes, learning will be judged with reference to participation and attendance, written work, class presentations, weekly on-line quizzes, and the completion of assignments. The actual grading system will be defined at the beginning of the semester in consultation with class members. There will be weekly quizzes but no midterm or final exam.

All written assignments must be submitted electronically, either from this Web site or as an attachment to an email. Each assignment will include instructions for how the computer file should be named and submitted. It is important to follow those instructions so that the instructor may save your submissions in an orderly way. It is not acceptable to hand-in hard copies.

Once deadlines are established for the term, there will be very little flexibility concerning when work must be completed. Deadlines are landmarks in a learning experience that is designed to be steady and continuous throughout the semester. The learning exprience is damaged by not meeting deadlines. Start all assignments early so that unexpected contingencies do not prevent you from completing them on time. Anticipate busy times of the semester--periods when assignments are due in a number of your classes--by getting an early start. Back-up all computer files regularly so that you don't lose your work because of computer failures.

Students will be expected to read the front-page articles in the New York Times every day. For details, see the announcement on this Web site entitled, ÄúDaily NY Times Reading Assignment. Äù Other materials for reading assignments will be found on the Web. Some field work may involve travel costs, and there may be admission fees to films and performances.

Class attendance and participation is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Mary C Kelley

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 351. Race and American Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/351/001.nsf

In this course, we will explore the social and creative processes whereby ideas and images of race and ethnicity have been produced, circulated, and contested in U.S. cinema from the silent period to the year 2002. In addition to analyzing the thematic and stylistic content of films produced both inside and outside of the Hollywood studio system, we will consider the historical factors that have tended to affect racial and ethnic representation, such as the implementation of censorship, foreign policy, technological change, and grassroots social movements. Group discussion in both section and lecture will be emphasized, as well as critical writing exercises. Using the resources provided, students will be expected to familiarize themselves with the critical vocabulary and historical background needed to carefully examine, compare, and critique the construction of race and ethnicity in and through U.S. film. Throughout the course, we will discuss: (1) the changing definition of "race" and "ethnicity" on the Hollywood screen; (2) the social barriers variously experienced by African, Arab, Asian, and Native Americans as well as Latino/as in gaining access to the film industry; (3) the intersection of racial and ethnic representation with issues of class, gender, and sexual identity; (4) historical parallels and differences between the experiences and treatment of people of color with members of "white" ethnic groups in the Hollywood film industry; and (5) creative strategies used by filmmakers, performers, and viewers to combat racism and discrimination in U.S. cinema. Mandatory weekly screenings (the evening "lab" component) will feature mainstream and independent feature films, as well as experimental shorts and documentaries by directors of diverse social and ethnic backgrounds. A $35 lab fee will be charged to cover audiovisual expenses.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING: class participation: 20%, quiz: 5%, film diary: 25%, midterm exam: 25%, final essay: 25%.

For more information contact: cbenamou@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 360 / GTBOOKS 350 / HISTORY 350. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 367 / HISTORY 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): GREGORY E DOWD

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 399. Race, Racism, and Ethnicity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/amcult/399/001.nsf

This course will use scholarly texts, newspaper articles, fiction, feature and documentary films, and the personal experiences of teachers and students to examine how the concepts of race and thenicity have operated and continue in American society. What are race and ethnicity, racism and ethnic bias? How has the challenge of racial and ethnic diversity impacted American efforts to construct a good society over the course of the nation's history? Do race and ethnicity continue to structure American Society? Our assumption will be that there is no "right" answer to these questions. Rather, students will be introduced to a range of critical voice on race and ethnicity and encouraged to explore and challenge their own views, those of their fellow students and those of the professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 401. Race and Racialization in the Americas.

Section 001 Race & Racialization. Meets with Sociology 495.007

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 212 or 213, and 312. (3). (Excl). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 430 / WOMENSTD 430. Feminist Thought.

Section 001 Feminist Theory: A Critique of Western Feminism.

Instructor(s): Nesha Z Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 240 and one 340-level WOMENSTD course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 433 / HISTART 431. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 433.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Native American Mental Health. (3 credits). Meets with Psych 401.017.

Instructor(s): Joseph Gone (jgone@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This undergraduate seminar will examine the "mental health" issues of American Indian and Alaska Native communities in the twenty-first century United States. Foci of the course will include attention to the postcolonial tensions surrounding mental health research, policy, and practice; the cross-cultural challenges confronting mental health professionals and researchers in Native communities; and the political and institutional realities that characterize mental health service delivery for Indian people. A central dilemma considered throughout the course will be whether and how to properly enculturate "mental health" research, policy and practice in the context of postcolonial Native America. The seminar is designed for advanced undergraduates from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and pre-health professions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Native American Autobiography. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read the major Native American autobiographical and ethnographical writings from the early 19th century to the mid-20th century. Our primary focus will consider how these writings contributed to the preservation of native identities and cultures, as well as significantly contributing to the formations of American and pantribal popular cultures. Our readings of six influential native autobiographies/ethnographies will be supplemented with an essay coursepak on the history and practices of ethnographic writing. Course requirements include a midterm and final paper of approximately 8-10 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Music of Pacific Islanders. (3 credits). Meets with Music 469 and 569

Instructor(s): Amy K Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/musicol/469/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 Asian Pacific American Narrative. (4 credits). Meets with English 417.010

Instructor(s): Sarita See

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 417.010.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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