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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 7:41 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ANTHRBIO 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andres R Frisancho (arfrisan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrbio/161/001.nsf

This course will examine the evolutionary foundations of human variability. For this purpose, the course will address the principles of human evolution, fossil evidence, behavior, and morphological characteristics of human and non-human primates. In addition, human inter-population differences and environmental factors that account for these differences will be evaluated. To accomplish this goal the lectures include multimedia information derived from film clips, slides, overhead illustrations, etc. During class each student is expected to participate actively in the development of all the topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRBIO 169. Natural Selection.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the exciting progress in natural selection theory after Darwin. Students will read such books as: The Beak of the Finch (Jonathan Weiner), The Selfish Gene (Richard Dawkins), and The Moral Animal (Robert Wright). We will ask: Why is natural selection considered the principle guiding force of evolution? What is the evidence for natural selection? In humans? In nonhumans? What are the different kinds of selection? At what level (s) does selection act? The group? The individual? The gene? Which of these levels is most potent and why? In the life sciences, what relevance does natural selection theory have for pesticide resistance and the development of effective vaccines? In the social sciences, how has natural selection theory been invoked in psychology, economics, and anthropology? Does the notion of selfish genes have any relevance to human behavior? How can behavior be adaptive yet not have any basis in genetic differences among individuals? Why does natural selection often favor flexible as opposed to "innate" responses? What roles are played by culture, learning, development? What is the naturalistic fallacy?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 351. Bones, Stones, and Genes: The Origins of Modern Humanity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu), John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrbio/351/001.nsf

Theories about modern human origins have received tremendous media coverage, deservedly so because they incorporate the fundamental issues of human evolution. Modern humans differ not only from other animals but also from their predecessors. People not very different from living populations in their behavioral capacities and anatomical features only first appear perhaps 100,000 to 200,000 years ago. Considerable controversy surrounds the question of whether these behavioral capacities and anatomies are causally linked, and why they appear when and where they do. New data have addressed these issues from disciplines as diverse as mitochondrial genetics and the foraging ecology of ancient human hunters, but the issues remain far from resolved. In this course, we propose to integrate these various sources of information and insight. We draw on genetics, fossils, and archaeology to outline and explain what actually constitutes modern humanity and its diversity, and how its unique aspects came about. Using the modern human orgins controversy as an organizing principle allows us to delve deeply into the different aspects of what it means to be human.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 368 / PSYCH 338. Primate Social Behavior I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrbio/368/001.nsf

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural enviornmental and social settings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRBIO 398. Honors in Biological Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seniors who choose to enter the honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior honors program should consult with the departmental honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the college honors program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior honors program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRBIO 468 / PSYCH 439 / WOMENSTD 468. Behavioral Biology of Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: ANTHRBIO 161, 361, 368, PSYCH 335, EEB 494. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/439/001.nsf

See Psychology 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 - Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRBIO.


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