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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies


This page was created at 7:42 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ASIAN 111 / HISTORY 151. Indian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 151.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 112 / HISTORY 152. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Section 001 Introduction to Southeast Asian History.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/152/001.nsf

See History 152.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 121 / HISTORY 121. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Elliott, James Lee

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/121/001.nsf

See History 121.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 203 / HISTART 203. Chinese Art and Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 203.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 225 / RELIGION 225. Hinduism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madhav Deshpande (mmdesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This course will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of "modernity." We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 230 / PHIL 230 / RELIGION 230. Introduction to Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Luis Oscar Gomez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/asian/230/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the study of Buddhism as a religious tradition. The course is arranged both thematically and historically, but does not pretend to cover the full range of Buddhist beliefs and practices. Among the themes linked to historical questions are: the Buddha in legend and history, Buddhist monks, nuns, and monasteries, lay practices, contemporary Buddhism, and Buddhism in the history of Southeast Asia and Japan. Themes discussed cross-culturally and across historical periods include: meditation, rituals and festivals, philosophy, and Buddhist images and ritual objects. The latter themes will include topics in Chinese and Tibetan Buddhism as well. Readings consist of five short books and a course pack that includes selected chapters from a textbook and primary texts in translation.

The course combines lectures (3/wk) with discussion (once/wk). Student evaluation will be based on participation in discussion sections (attendance required), 5 unannounced quizzes, two short (3 page) papers, and a comprehensive final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 251. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Section 001 Traditional Chinese Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/asian/251/001.nsf

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in pre-modern Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics. In addition to examining the content of Chinese science, we will also explore religious, philosophical, social, political, and cultural factors that contributed (or hampered) the development of science. Some questions that we will pursue: What were Chinese attitudes towards nature and the past and how did they differ from those in the West? Why did the Science Revolution not happen in China (or did it)? Readings will focus on primary source materials (in translation). Students will give oral presentations and write several short papers. No knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 001 The Japanese Encounter with the West.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the various phases of Japan's encounter with the West from the 16th-century introduction of Christianity and the mid-19th century opening to Western trade, to the present. We will examine the shifting representations of the West in the Japanese imagination, for example, as object of aspiration and identification, as "barbarian" enemy and rival, protective father-figure, space of erotic fantasy, and so on.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 002 Filming Fiction in Japan.

Instructor(s): Ken K Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the dynamics of reiteration in a culture known for its repeated adaptations of cultural materials. What are we saying when we designate one version as "original" and another as "adaptation?" What does "originality mean in a culture that seems to be constantly rehashing old material? These are the questions we will be asking in reference fo the prior texts appropriated by well-known directors and the films that resulted.

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ASIAN 254. Undergraduate Seminar in Korean Culture.

Section 001 Buddhist Nuns in Korea.

Instructor(s): Cho

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Korean language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission for a total of six credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 301(401) / WOMENSTD 301. Writing Japanese Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Ramirez-Christensen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course on writing by and about women - women's self-representation and male major authors' representations of women in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th century) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the portrayal of Heian women authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the No and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha); and in stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervenng representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of recuperating women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society. Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; and in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy. Materials and focus will vary from year to year.

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ASIAN 303 / RELIGION 303. Sikhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to study Sikh religious beliefs, practices, and institutions. The emphasis will be on the teachings of the founder, Guru Nanak, and the major doctrinal developments under subsequent Gurus. Particular attention will be paid to the scripture, the Adi Granth, and other Sikh texts as means to understanding the evolution of the Sikh community. The course begins with the examination of the formation of early Sikh tradition in the socio-religious context of North India and ends with the analysis of the historical and social processes through which the Khalsa Panth was consolidated. An essay of 3,000 words will carry 30% of the course marks. There will be two tests: a mid-term worth 20% and a final worth 30%. The remaining 20% of marks will be allotted to the presentation and participation in tutorial discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 361. The Pursuit of Happiness in the Chinese Tradition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/asian/361/001.nsf

The thematic focus of this course is what the philosopher-psychologist William James observed a century ago: "How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure." Although the idea of the "pursuit of happiness" has a privileged place in American thinking, reflections on the happiness question can readily be found in many other cultures through the ages as well. In this course, we will study texts from Chinese civilization as their creative and thinking authors pondered this age-old question and the meaning of life. We will discuss such issues as the generally life-affirming world views of the Chinese; the debates on how to construct a perfect society; what constitutes a good life; the fulfillments of spiritual cultivation, love and marriage, having a family and friends, work and play, and public service and/or private artistic and scholarly pursuit; and attitudes towards fate, suffering, evil, war, and death. Texts selected will be works of literature in the broad sense of the word, including philosophical, historical, and religious texts as well as belles-lettres. The course covers mainly the period from early times to the 12th century, but several works from later eras will also be included. Sample readings are: texts in Confucianism, Taoism, Legalism, and Buddhism; the historical account of the First Emperor of Qin who created the Chinese empire in 221 BCE; the works of China's greatest recluse-poet Tao Qian (365 - 427); the song lyrics of the woman poet Li Qingzhao (1084 - ca. 1151); The Plum in the Golden Vase , an anonymous 16th-century novel that passionately depicts the dying of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) through the main characters' relentless indulgence in the four vices of "wine, lust, greed, and anger"; and Six Chapters of a Floating Life by Shen Fu (1763 - after 1809), a true story about an ordinary artistic couple who were ostensibly failures in life, but happy in their failures.

The format of the course consists of three lectures and one recitation session per week. A few brief reaction papers, three short papers (four or five pages each), and a final examination are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 395. Honors Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors candidate in Asian Studies and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May be elected a total of four times. May be elected for a maximum of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 419(SSEA 420). Hindi-Urdu Poetry from 1800 to the Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Siddiqi

Prerequisites & Distribution: Second-year proficiency in Hindi-Urdu. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 428 / POLSCI 339 / PHIL 428 / SOC 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Lieberthal (kliebert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/339/001.nsf

See Political Science 339.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 475(JAPANESE 475). Japanese Cinema.

Section 001 Meets with Film Video 441.003.

Instructor(s): Mark H Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/filmvid/441/003.nsf

This course will survey the history of Japanese cinema with the aim of understanding a vital aspect of twentieth century Japanese culture. While structured chronologically, students will develop sophisticated approaches to understand what a national cinema is, how it relates to national identity, and how it fits into the global film scene. All aspects and genres of Japanese film come under consideration, including both the art film and more popular forms. We will start with the early cinema, and proceed through the silent era sword films, the classics of the 1950s, documentary, the avant-garde, ending with the recent explosion in animation art. Course requirements include outside screenings, papers, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 Contemporary Japanese Politics. Meets 10/15 - 11/14. (Drop/Add deadline=October 21).

Instructor(s): Ikuo Kabashima

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seminar on contemporary Japanese politics, concentrating on electoral behavior and attitudes. Students will review research on these topics written in English, and in Japanese for those with language competence. It is planned that the students will jointly prepare an article, based in part on Japanese election and survey data, for possible submission to a refereed English language journal. This course is appropriate for students with an interest in Japanese politics an/or political behavior in general, either graduate students or advanced undergraduates. Those with skills in quantitative methods are welcome but that is not required. Admittance will be by permission of the instructor. Anyone who migh tbe interested is urged to get in touch with Prof. John Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu) as soon as possible.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 001 Rereading "Letters From A Javanese Princess." (1 credit). Meets 9/19-10/17. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.002. and Women's Studies 481.001 (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Goenowan Mohamad, Nancy Florida (nflorida@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A series of seminars on the traces of the "West" in Indonesian political and literary ideas, using translations of the letters of Kartini, the daughter of a Javanese regent at the beginning of the twentieth century, as a primary source for discussion. The main topics to be covered include the questions of woman, Islam, and the nation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 002 Indonesian Islam. (1 credit). Mini course meeting through October 25. Meets with AAPTIS 593.002 (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Nurcholish Madji

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This mini-course explores the past development and current place of Islam in Indonesia. It begins with a brief overview of the history of Islam in Indonesia, tracing the region's Islamization beginning in the 15th century, Islam and politics in the nationalist movements of the late 19th and early 20th century, and Islam and the Indonesian revolution in the late 1940s that led to the country's independence in 1949. Particular attention will be given to Islam in contemporary Indonesia, addressing such topics as the characteristics and diversity of Islamic practice, Islam as a focus of nationalism, and Islam and politics. The course is open to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Requirements: Classes will consist of orientation lectures and directed discussions of assigned readings. Students are expected to attend four 3-hour class sessions (9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. on September 6, 13, 20, and 27) and one of two public lectures to be given by the instructor (on September 13 from 2:00-3:30 p.m. or date TBA). A 10-page paper on themes raised in the course will be due on the last day of class. Room TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ASIAN.


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