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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biology


This page was created at 7:43 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


The Department formerly known as Biology divided into two separate departments, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and MCDB (Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology). The Interdepartmental Program in Biology (BIOLOGY) is administered jointly by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).

The concentration programs remain the same; however, there some changes in how courses are listed starting this fall term. 100 and 220 - level courses are listed under the subject of BIOLOGY, as are some of the core concentration courses such as Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution. Intermediate and upper level courses are listed under EEB or MCDB, depending on the course topics. Students must look under the three subjects to see whether or not a course is being offered.

Those students planning to register for independent research, 300 or 400, will enroll in either MCDB 300 or 400 or EEB 300 or 400, based on their faculty sponsor's departmental affiliation.

Courses in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Courses in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


BIOLOGY 100. Biology for Nonscientists.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen A Ocorr (kocorr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed. Not open to those with Advanced Placement or "Departmental" credit in biology, nor to those concentrating in the biological sciences. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio100/

BIOLOGY 100 is a one-term course designed to introduce students to current biological concepts. The course consists of three hours of lecture per week plus a coordinated discussion session which occupies two hours per week. Biology 100 provides an introduction to some general principles of biology and concentrates on the areas of cell biology and biotechnology, genetics and genetic diseases, evolution, and environmental biology.

A major objective of this course is to point out to students the nature of the scientific process and illustrate the uses and non-uses of science in contemporary life. Wherever possible, the ethical and social implications of contemporary scientific effort will be discussed. This course is designed for students with a minimal background in the biological sciences, but we do assume some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level. Discussion sections enroll 20 students and are taught by graduate student instructors. In the discussion section, students have the opportunity to review material presented in lecture and participate in discussions of issues raised in the lecture segment.

Textbook: BioInquiry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 101. Biology and Human Affairs.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John H Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu), Mark L Wilson (wilsonml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/biology/101/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to those aspects of biology that have direct applicability to the lives of people in today's world. It covers current controversies within biology, especially as they relate to human life and human affairs. Topics discussed include race, health, and the environment. Background information is given for each topic, but the emphasis is placed on the controversies and the role of science in human affairs. In addition to the two lectures per week, there is a two-hour discussion period in which the topics are further explored and films are frequently shown.

Textbook: Vandermeer, J. Reconstructing Biology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 103. Ecology: Principles and Applications.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Schueller (schuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/Bio103/

This course introduces students to basic principles of ecology and their application to current ecological and environmental issues. It also emphasizes developing skills for "thinking like a scientist," including designing and interpreting experiments or observations. We will cover aspects of physiological ecology, population dynamics, species interactions in communities, ecosystem functions, and patterns and causes of biodiversity. These principles will provide the basis for a deeper understanding of applied topics, such as global warming, invasive species, organic farming, sustainable fisheries, Lyme's disease, forest fires, and acid rain. Grades will be based on frequent in-class quizzes, field notebooks, and independent and group projects. There will be three lecture hours per week and two all-day field trips. This course is appropriate for non-science concentrators who want to learn the basic science behind environmental buzzwords and/or who need Natural Science ! distribution credits and want a course that is interesting, understandable, and broadly relevant.

Textbook: Smith, R.L. & T.M. Smith. 2003. Elements of Ecology. 5th Edition. Benjamen/Cummings Science Publishing, San Francisco.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 110 / UC 110 / GEOSCI 171 / NRE 110 / AOSS 171. Introduction to Global Change I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ben A Van Der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange1

See University Courses 110.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

BIOLOGY 120. First Year Seminar in Biology.

Section 001 EMERGING AND RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

Instructor(s): Alice G Reinarz (areinarz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the age of discovery of antibiotics, medical scientists often expressed confidence in winning the "War on Disease." Microbes have prevailed, however, and recent news is filled with accounts of recurring and previously unknown threats. This seminar will examine clinical victories and failures to contain infectious diseases. Models will include polio, influenza, HIV infections, multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, and Ebola. This course is limited to 20 first-year students. The course will be primarily discussion format and will include oral presentations by students. The grade will be based on class discussion, group presentation, and written assignments. Textbooks used: The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett (1995) Penguin Books, New York, and The Hot Zone by Richard Preston (1994), Anchor Books (Doubleday), New York.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 120. First Year Seminar in Biology.

Section 002 LIFE IN THE "JUNGLE": THE ECOLOGY OF URBAN AREAS.

Instructor(s): John R Butler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since 1950, metropolises with over one million people have increased from 78 to 260. In addition to population increases is the increase in urban space. In the United States, for example, New York, Chicago, and Cleveland expanded their areas by 65, 46, and 33%, respectively. This type of sprawling urban expansion is called "suburban" and is impacting large geographic areas. This seminar course will examine the impacts of urban development. In "The Ecology of Urban Areas," we will learn about present urban ecological and environmental impacts on living things as well as help focus our attention on possible future impacts and potential ways to avoid them. Students will have a unique opportunity to learn about ecology and environmental issues by examining a relatively familiar human-created ecosystem-the urban "Jungle."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 140. Genetics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julian P Adams

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio140/

This introduction to the impact of modern genetics on society is designed for students not concentrating in the sciences. Students will gain a background in genetics that should enable them to:

  1. understand and evaluate reports on the latest advances in genetics that appear in the media;
  2. be able to discuss the social history of genetics;
  3. have a better appreciation of the "scientific method;" and
  4. discuss aspects of genetics that have a bearing on our daily lives.

There will be three lectures and a discussion group per week, with topics such as human diversity; genetics and medicine, including cancer, AIDS, and complex diseases; gene therapy; DNA and forensic analysis; technological and economic applications of genetics; and biological determinism. Course evaluation is mainly based on a flexible combination of short-answer exams and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 162. Introductory Biology.

Instructor(s): John W Schiefelbein Jr (schiefel@umich.edu), Barry M OConnor (bmoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, 1039 Chemistry Building (734) 764-1430.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: Wait list maintained in 1039 Chemistry (764-1440).

BIOLOGY 163. Honors Introductory Biology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel J Klionsky (klionsky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/research/labs/klionsky/klionskycrs4.html

A one-term introductory course intended for Honors students concentrating in Biology. Open to other qualified students at the instructor's discretion. This course will cover topics in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, and transmission genetics. Principles of evolution and ecology will be covered in a context that relates them to the previous topics. The focus of the course is to develop thinking skills in biological sciences with an emphasis on conceptual understanding of the material. Students are required to attend four hours of class each week and one hour of discussion. Students purchase a course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes; the textbook is optional. Students are expected to complete the assigned reading prior to each class. A reading quiz will be administered at the start of each session and will constitute one-half of the course grade. Lectures will be minimal and are designed to briefly cover difficult topics with the assumption that students have read the appropriate material. Students will work in groups to solve problems designed to instill a practical understanding of the topics being covered. Participation in the groups is mandatory. The remainder of the course grade will be based on quizzes that reflect the in-class problems. These quizzes will be cumulative in their coverage of material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No wait list.

BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

BIOLOGY 207. Introductory Microbiology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul V Dunlap (pvdunlap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course consists of three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory session each week. The lectures describe the basic biology of microbial life, with emphasis on the domains Bacteria (eubacteria) and Archaea (archaebacteria), and including the domain Eucarya (protists and fungi). The fundamentals of microbial cell structure, metabolism and growth will be presented, together with the metabolic, ecological and phylogenetic diversity of microbes, their biotechnological applications and medical importance. The laboratory sessions will introduce microbiology laboratory practice, including microscopy, aseptic and pure-culture techniques, experimental manipulation and microbial enrichment, isolation, and characterization. Grades are based on four lecture exams and, in the laboratory sessions, on assessments of practical skills and weekly lab reports. The course is required for the microbiology concentration program, and it is appropriate for the biology concentration.

Textbook: Microbial Life by Perry, Staley, Lory. Sinauer Associates, 2002. ISBN 0-87893-765-0

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 208. Embryology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn W Tosney (ktosney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio208/index.htm

In this Embryology course, we will study the entire organism as a function of time. We will seek to understand how a single cell, the fertilized egg, develops through time to form a multicellular organism. We will study the early stages of development, when cells divide and form the basic structures in the right places, establishing the basic body plan for each individual and initiating the development of different cell types.

We will study the embryo as it progresses through stages of cleavage, blastula formation, gastrulation, and organogenesis. We will maintain a focus on human development, but we will use animal models to understand developmental concepts such as differentiation, determination, epigenesis, and axis formation. Another goal is to develop conceptual and analytical skills, particularly the abilities to select and analyze information critically, to pose problems proficiently, to solve problems perceptively, to communicate persuasively, and to work as an effective part of a team. The course will combine lectures with computer-intensive exercises.

Two required textbooks:

  • Developmental Biology by Scott F. Gilbert. 6th edition. Sinauer.
  • aCross Development by Kathryn Tosney. Sinauer

Recommended:

  • Jay Lash, Interactive Embryology: The Human Embryo Program, a CD, Sinauer.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, Contact faculty instructor to put name on wait list.

BIOLOGY 222. From Message to Mind: An Introduction to Neurobiology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen S Easter Jr (sseaster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio222

An introduction to molecular, cellular, and systems-level neurobiology. Topics include: (1) bioelectricity; (2) intercellular communication; (3) sensory transduction and processing; (4) motor function; and (5) development of the brain and sensory systems. Students will be evaluated by exams, short papers, and problem sets. There are three lecture hours.

Textbook: G.G. Matthews. Neurobiology: molecules, cells, and systems. 2nd. Edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 225(325). Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cunming Duan (cduan@umich.edu), Gisela F Wilson (wilsongf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and a year of chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio225/bio225.htm

This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals and emphasizes zoological rather than human aspects. The course uses evidence from different groups of organisms to identify the general principles of functional mechanisms. It also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey. The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three one-hour lectures a week, three one-hour examinations, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 226(326). Animal Physiology Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 (or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 325, with permission). Students who intend at a later date to take BIOLOGY 225 will not be admitted to BIOLOGY 226 without special permission. (2). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio226/

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Winter 2001, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 252. Chordate Anatomy and Phylogeny.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald L Swiderski (wfink@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches the comparative method, using the "three-fold parallelism" of anatomy, ontogeny, and paleontology. All examples are based on chordate animals, with emphasis on their anatomy and development. The introductory third of the course includes the theoretical basis of the comparative method, principles of evolutionary theory and speciation, and phylogenetics. The remainder of the course involves application of the method, with a survey of chordate structure, including the integument, skeleton, muscles, and the circulatory, urogenital, digestive, respiratory, and nervous systems. The laboratory provides practical experience in the comparative method, including dissections. There are three one-hour lectures per week and one three-hour laboratory. There are two hourly examinations and a final examination for the lecture, and a laboratory practical exam. A detailed syllabus and laboratory manual, rather than an assigned textbook, are used.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 281. General Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Earl E Werner (eewerner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and a laboratory course in chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/biology/281/001.nsf

Ecology is the science by which we study how organisms (animals, plants, and microbes) interact in and with the natural world. These interactions result in changes, over space and time, in the abundance of organisms of different kinds. BIOLOGY 281 is a survey of topics in the science of ecology including: physical properties of the environment and how organisms respond to them; how organisms interact with each other within species and between species; population dynamics; ecological communities; and indirect effects. There are two lectures and one 2-hour discussion per week. Students are expected to read the text. BIOLOGY 281 is intended for natural science concentrators. Students who have completed (or nearly so) the prerequisites for their natural science concentration will be better prepared to take BIOLOGY 281.

Textbook: Essentials of Ecology. C.R. Townsend, J.L. Harper, and M. Began Blackwell.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 282. General Ecology Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Sheila Schueller (schuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162, a laboratory course in chemistry, and concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 281. (3). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This laboratory course introduces the basic concepts and methods used in ecological research. The laboratories consist of both field and laboratory research projects, field trips, computer analyses, and an independent research project that is designed by each student. Students will write up laboratory reports and a paper on their independent research, give an oral presentation on their independent research, and participate in laboratory discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 288. Animal Diversity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerald Ray Smith (grsmith@umich.edu), Diarmaid O'Foighil (diarmaid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio288/

BIOLOGY 288 will provide biology concentrators with a comprehension of the remarkable diversity of animal body plans present in nature. It will devote equal time to invertebrates and vertebrates and will consider the spectrum of multicellular animal life in the context of major issues in evolution and ecology. Diversity in morphology, development, life history, behavior and ecology will be addressed, with an emphasis on evolutionary innovations which underlay significant animal radiations. Laboratory exercises will demonstrate some of the above processes as well as anatomy, functional morphology, and hypotheses of adaptation. The laboratory exercises and lectures will be taxon based; processes will be touched upon repeatedly in a comparative manner.

This course is intended to serve the needs of Biology concentrators. There will be three one-hour lectures per week and three-hour lab session. Tests based on lecture material will be multiple choice and short answer questions. There will also be a term paper project and a lab practical exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 305. Genetics.

Section 001 Term exams are given Monday nights.

Instructor(s): Janine R Maddock (maddock@umich.edu), Ronald E Ellis (ronellis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio305/bio305.html

Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics. There are three hours of lecture each week and one discussion section directed by GSIs. The discussion sections expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three term exams and a final covering lectures, discussions, and reading assignments. Exams include new problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections or the Genetics Study Center. The three term exams are given Monday nights.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen A Ocorr (kocorr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 or a 200-level course in Biology taken at UM; and CHEM 210. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 311, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio310/

Introductory Biochemistry is designed to be a general introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. The biweekly lectures for this course are designed to help student put biochemical reactions into a cellular context. Students are exposed to the strategies used by cells and multicellular organisms to coordinate the activity of various metabolic pathways. Topics covered include: protein structure and function; enzyme kinetics; molecular biology techniques, intermediary metabolism; photosynthesis; transcription; translation; and the hormonal regulation of metabolism.

In addition to the lectures, there is a weekly discussion session which has a project-based format. Students are provided with an opportunity to become more actively involved in their own learning experience and to further explore the relationship between biochemistry and the world around them through weekly mini-presentations. The weekly projects are designed to help students master the material using the Internet, scientific literature, etc. Discussion sessions are informal, allowing students ample opportunity to discuss the lecture topics and ask questions. There is an extensive web site for this course providing students with numerous additional resources to help them master the material (http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio310/). Grades in this course are based on performance in the discussion session, and three in-class exams.

Textbook:

  • Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry by Nelson and Cox. 3rd. Edition
  • Absolute, Ultimate Guide to Principles of Biochemistry by Osgood and Ocorr. 3rd. Edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 311. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth J Balazovich

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 or a 200-level course in Biology taken at UM; and CHEM 210. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 310, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/biology/311/001.nsf

This course is taught by a self-paced, personalized system of instruction. Students interact, according to their own schedules, with undergraduate TA's. The student takes both a written and an oral quiz for each of 12 units which is graded and evaluated by the TA. If mastery is attained, the student may proceed to the next unit. Grades are assigned according to the number of units successfully completed and performance on the midterm and final examinations. This system is designed to take into consideration different rates of individual learning as well as to eliminate competition among students. TA's are available approximately 75-80 hours/week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 390. Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Priscilla K Tucker (ptuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162; prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 305. (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at the Biological Station). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at the Biological Station).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/biology/390/001.nsf

This lecture/discussion course covers the fundamentals of evolutionary biology through an examination of its conceptual framework, classical studies, and current research topics. It includes a historical survey of evolutionary thought from classical times to the present and critical examination of such topics as natural selection, adaptation, population genetics, speciation, phylogenetics, macroevolution, evolution of development, and molecular evolution. Weekly discussions will focus on primary literature. Writing assignments and examinations will be given to assess students' knowledge of course material.

Textbook: Evolutionary Analysis by Freeman & Herron. Prentice-Hall. (2001).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Graduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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