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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Chemistry


This page was created at 7:44 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


The Chemistry Department has three types of courses available for students starting out toward careers in any of the sciences, engineering, or medicine. Students are placed into these courses according to the results of the tests in chemistry and mathematics that they take during orientation.

For students interested in the sciences, engineering or medicine, either Chem. 130 or Chem. 210/211 can be their starting point. Students who have had a strong course in high school (which may include AP credit in chemistry) are advised to start in Chem. 210 and 211, the laboratory course that accompanies it. Chem. 130 is recommended for all other students. Section 400 of Chem. 130 is reserved for students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section and more frequent contact with both senior faculty and teaching assistants.

Students who have had little or no laboratory work in high school should plan to elect Chem. 125 with Chem. 130. Other students electing Chem. 130 may postpone laboratory to a subsequent term.

Laboratory Check-in

Check into labs on the first day they are scheduled. You must take a print-out of your class schedule to Lab Check-in. If you fail to appear, your space may be given to a waitlisted student 2 hours after the lab begins. You are at risk of having to waitlist for another lab.

Chem 125, 211 and 216 Laboratory Waitlist

Prior to the first day of class, check for openings at CRISP first. Fill out Waitlist Form in 1500 Chemistry. Go to Room 1500 Chemistry to get into labs 2 hours after desired lab begins. Sections will be assigned there.


CHEM 105 / AOSS 105 / ENSCEN 105. Our Changing Atmosphere.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John R Barker (jbarker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/aoss/105/001.nsf

This course considers the science needed to understand human-induced threats to the atmospheric environment, with special emphasis on the global changes that are taking place, or are anticipated. We will discuss the greenhouse effect (and its impact on climate), ozone depletion, the polar ozone holes, and urban air pollution. Some basic meteorology will be presented, including how climate changes might affect the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes. Students will have access to real-time weather information via computer. This lecture course is intended for non-science concentrators, and there are no prerequisites. Grades will be based on three one-hour exams (no final exam) and homework.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory.

Section 100, 200.

Instructor(s): Nancy Kerner (nkerner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130. No credit granted to those who have completed CHEM 211. (2). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem125/

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, CHEM 130. It is intended that students planning to enroll in CHEM 130 that have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in CHEM 125. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform, and interpret experiments. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The goal is to provide students both with a more accurate picture of the scientific process and also with skills that are relevant to solving real life problems. Much of the course work is done as a member of a team. Student groups each explore the same problem with each group using different reagents and/or conditions. A networked computer system is used to collect, pool, and summarize the largely qualitative class data. Student groups address questions which require them to organize the class data using commercial graphing software. Group answers are presented in discussion.

The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to each multi-period project laboratory. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics and problems that will be investigated in the laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory where team data are shared, analyzed, and evaluated. The third begins in the first hour following completion of each multi-period project lab where groups communicate their findings during a student-led discussion. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 30% of the grade. The remaining 70% of the grade is based on the points acquired in laboratory and discussion.

TEXT: Collaborative Investigations in Chemistry, Konigsberg Kerner & Penner-Hahn, Hayden McNeil (Required).

NOTE: Section 100 Students must also elect one 100 level dis/lab combination. Combinations are made in consecutive order and are linked. For example: CHEM 125-110 DIS section and CHEM 125-111 LAB section. Section 200 Students must also elect one 200 level DIS/LAB combination. For example: CHEM 125-250 DIS section and CHEM 125-251 LAB section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory.

Section 600 Honors.

Instructor(s): Amy Gottfried (acgottfr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130. No credit granted to those who have completed CHEM 211. (2). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($60) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

CHEM 125.600 is the associated section of laboratory offered for students enrolled in the CHEM 130.600 section. This course will be taught in conjunction with the CHEM 130.600 section, and students must be concurrently enrolled in both sections. The laboratory component for this course will emphasize critical thinking skills, problem solving, and hands-on experiments. Students will have the opportunity to design their own experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data. Use of benchtop and handheld electronic data acquisition equipment will be stressed as well as examination of the accuracy and reliability of such equipment.

As described under the heading for CHEM 130.600, the laboratory portion of this integrated course will involve a pedagogically rational intersection of discussion, hands-on, and project-based activities in a studio format. The grading for the laboratory component will be based on class discussion and participation, on developing proficiency with hands-on laboratory operations (designing, implementing, reporting and critically analyzing experimental work).

TEXT:Chemistry: A Molecular Science, by Olmsted, ISBN#0471390712

Students enrolled in CHEM 125.600 are also required to enroll in CHEM 130.600. Overrides obtained from Honors Office during First-Year Summer Orientation by recommendation of advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles.

Section 100, 300.

Instructor(s): Robert Sharp (rrsharp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem130/

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

TEXT: Chemistry, The Central Science by Brown et al, 9th edition, ISBN 0131763091, Prentice Hall (Required).

Black Solutions Manual by Wilson, ISBN 013009790X, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Study Guide by Hill, ISBN 0130097050, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Jadwiga Sipowska (dotie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem130/

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

TEXT: Chemistry, The Central Science by Brown et al, 9th edition, ISBN 0131763091, Prentice Hall (Required).

Black Solutions Manual by Wilson, ISBN 013009790X, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Study Guide by Hill, ISBN 0130097050, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles.

Section 400.

Instructor(s): Jadwiga Sipowska (dotie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem130/

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

TEXT: Chemistry, The Central Science by Brown et al, 9th edition, ISBN 0131763091, Prentice Hall (Required).

Black Solutions Manual by Wilson, ISBN 013009790X, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Study Guide by Hill, ISBN 0130097050, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles.

Section 500.

Instructor(s): James Penner-Hahn (jeph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem130/

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

TEXT: Chemistry, The Central Science by Brown et al, 9th edition, ISBN 0131763091, Prentice Hall (Required).

Black Solutions Manual by Wilson, ISBN 013009790X, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Study Guide by Hill, ISBN 0130097050, Prentice Hall (Optional).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles.

Section 600 Honors

Instructor(s): Amy Gottfried (acgottfr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science particularly chemistry as their major, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130.600 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry in an experimental manner, integrating traditional lecture with hands on laboratory methods in a studio classroom. The topics will include the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. The integrated CHEM 130.600 studio section will give students an opportunity to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do within a highly collaborative setting. Emphasis in the studio classroom will be on drawing a direct connection between lecture content and scientific phenomenon. The integrated CHEM 130.600 and 125.600 will meet in a large lecture hall one time each week for one and a half hours for instruction led by a faculty member and twice a week in three hour small group studio sections led by a graduate student instructor.

Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Students in this course will earn Honors credit. Course grades will be determined from in class discussion and participation, two one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination including both written and hands-on portions.

TEXT:Chemistry: A Molecular Science, by Olmsted, ISBN#0471390712

Students enrolled in CHEM 130.600 are also required to also enroll in section CHEM 125.600. Overrides obtained from Honors Office during First Year Summer Orientation by recommendation of advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CHEM 210. Structure and Reactivity I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Brian Coppola (bcoppola@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem210/

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 211. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

CHEM 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students, and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a graduate student instructor per week. There are Monday and Thursday evening workshops with the professors from 5:30-7:30 in 1400 Chemistry. There are three hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination.

TEXT: Organic Chemistry, Ege, 4th edition, Houghton Mifflin (Required).
Structure & Reactivity (CHEM 210 Exam Bank), Coppola, Hayden McNeil, Fall 2002 (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 210. Structure and Reactivity I.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): William Pearson (wpearson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem210/

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 211. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

CHEM 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students, and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a graduate student instructor per week. There are Monday and Thursday evening workshops with the professors from 5:30-7:30 in 1400 Chemistry. There are three hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination.

TEXT: Organic Chemistry, Ege, 4th edition, Houghton Mifflin (Required).
Structure & Reactivity (CHEM 210 Exam Bank), Coppola, Hayden McNeil, Fall 2002 (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 210. Structure and Reactivity I.

Section 300.

Instructor(s): Neil Marsh (nmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem210/

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 211. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

CHEM 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students, and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a graduate student instructor per week. There are Monday and Thursday evening workshops with the professors from 5:30-7:30 in 1400 Chemistry. There are three hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination.

TEXT: Organic Chemistry, Ege, 4th edition, Houghton Mifflin (Required).
Structure & Reactivity (CHEM 210 Exam Bank), Coppola, Hayden McNeil, Fall 2002 (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 211. Investigations in Chemistry.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Nolta (nolta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: To be taken with CHEM 210. (1). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($67.50) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($67.50) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem211/

CHEM 211 is a laboratory introduction to methods of investigation in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students solve individual problems using microscale equipment and a variety of techniques such as thin layer chromatography, titrations, and spectroscopy. The course consists of a four-hour laboratory period with a teaching assistant under the supervision of the professor. Students keep laboratory notebooks, which also serve as laboratory reports. Grades are based on performance in the laboratory and the laboratory notebooks.

TEXT: Investigations in Chemistry, Nolta, Fall 2002, Hayden McNeil (Required).

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 210. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 215. Structure and Reactivity II.

Instructor(s): Melinda Gugelchuk (melinda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/215/100.nsf

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 216. Students must elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

CHEM 215 continues the study of organic chemistry started in CHEM 210. A functional group approach is used, centering on the carbonyl group. The chemistry of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives are treated in detail. The course has three examinations and a final examination.

TEXT: Structure & Reactivity (CHEM 215 Exam Bank), Coppola, ISBN 0738005037, Hayden McNeil (Required).
Organic Chemistry, Ege, ISBN 0618023259, Houghton Mifflin (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 216. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds.

Instructor(s): Masato Koreeda (koreeda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215. (2). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($62.50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($62.50) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem216/

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

TEXT: Synthesis and Characterization (CHEM 216 Lab Manual), Koreeda, ISBN 0738005215, Fall 2002, Hayden McNeil (Required).
Macroscale and Microscale Organic Experiments (custom abbreviated version), Williamson, ISBN 0618233423, Houghton Mifflin (Required).

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 215. Students must elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 218. Independent Study in Biochemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. For students with less than junior standing. (1). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/undergrad/research.html

This course provides an introduction to independent biochemistry research under the direction of a faculty member whose project is in the biochemistry area. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Chemistry Advising Office, 1500 Chemistry, provides information to help students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. CHEM 218 is for biochemistry concentrators, and research projects must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Exact details such as nature of research, level of involvement of the student, and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in a minimum of three hours per week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted one for the Advising Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive biochemistry credit for CHEM 218, the student must work on a research project supervised by a member of the biochemistry concentration research faculty, and the project must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the biochemistry research faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 219. Independent Study in Chemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. For students with less than junior standing. (1). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/undergrad/research.html

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Chemistry faculty member. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Chemistry Advising Office, 1500 Chemistry, provides information and help to students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credits awarded, and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted one for the Advising Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for CHEM 219, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 230. Physical Chemical Principles and Applications.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): B. J. Evans (bjemag@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem230/

This Chemistry course is intended as a fourth term in chemistry for science concentrators and pre-professional students, completing the two-year chemistry sequence required by, for example, the medical, dental, and engineering programs. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

In CHEM 230, students will be introduced to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. These include the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; phase transitions and solutions; electrochemistry and the principles of oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical kinetics and the study of chemical orbitals and chemical bonding; transition metal chemistry and coordination complexes. These topics will be treated from the viewpoint of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of physical chemical principles to chemical behavior in a broad spectrum of settings.

CHEM 230 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Problem Solving Sessions On Thursdays 5:00-6:00 P.M. in 1210 Chemistry Course grades will be determined from three one-hour examinations.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry by Evans, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole.

Solutions Manual, ISBN 053440266, Brooks/Cole.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 230. Physical Chemical Principles and Applications.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): B. J. Evans (bjemag@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem230/

This Chemistry course is intended as a fourth term in chemistry for science concentrators and pre-professional students, completing the two-year chemistry sequence required by, for example, the medical, dental, and engineering programs. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

In CHEM 230, students will be introduced to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. These include the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; phase transitions and solutions; electrochemistry and the principles of oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical kinetics. These topics will be treated from the viewpoint of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of physical chemical principles to chemical behavior in a broad spectrum of settings.

CHEM 230 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from three one-hour examinations.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry by Evans, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole.

Solutions Manual, ISBN 053440266, Brooks/Cole.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 241. Introduction to Chemical Analysis.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Larry Beck (lbeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 242. (2). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/241/100.nsf

This course introduces the principles and techniques of modern quantitative chemical analysis. Chemical equilibrium as the basis of analytical techniques will be emphasized. Photometric and potentiometric titrimetry will be discussed to illustrate quantitative chemical measurements. Molecular (UV) and atomic spectroscopy as well as mass spectrometry will be discussed. Fundamental concepts of chemical separations including GC and HPLC will be discussed. Throughout the course the fundamental principles of experiment design, laboratory data systems and statistical evaluation will be stressed.

TEXT: Exploring Chemical Analysis, Harris, 2nd edition, ISBN 0716735407, Freeman (Required)

Note:This course is linked to CHEM 242; students are expected to elect both CHEM 241 (2 credits) and CHEM 242 (2 credits) in the same academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 242. Introduction to Chemical Analysis Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Michael Morris (mdmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 241. (2). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/242/100.nsf

CHEM 242 is the laboratory component of the CHEM 241/242 course sequence. Experiments include studies of equilibria (titration, potentiometry), separations (gas and liquid chromatography), electrochemistry, and spectroscopy (atomic and molecular absorption and emission). Grading is based on laboratory reports.

TEXT: Coursepak by Dollar Bill available in bookstores

Note: This course is linked to CHEM 241. Students must elect both CHEM 241 (for 2 credits) and CHEM 242 (for 2 credits) in the same term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 260. Chemical Principles.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Anthony Francis (afrancis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://sitemaker.umich.edu/chem260_fall02

CHEM 260 is a continuation of CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, and is designed primarily for students in the biological and chemical sciences. This course introduces students to the quantal nature of matter (the Schrödinger equation and the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics), the basic principles of chemical thermodynamics (1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics) and kinetics (empirical rate laws). In addition, this course introduces students to the fundamental principles necessary to understand spectroscopy (electronic, vibrational, and rotational) and electrochemistry (free energy, Nernst and Faraday's laws). Grading is based on hour exams, problem sets, and a final examination.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry, by Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, 5th edition, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole Publishing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 260. Chemical Principles.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Lohr (llohr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://sitemaker.umich.edu/chem260_fall02

CHEM 260 is a continuation of CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, and is designed primarily for students in the biological and chemical sciences. This course introduces students to the quantal nature of matter (the Schrödinger equation and the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics), the basic principles of chemical thermodynamics (1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics) and kinetics (empirical rate laws). In addition, this course introduces students to the fundamental principles necessary to understand spectroscopy (electronic, vibrational, and rotational) and electrochemistry (free energy, Nernst and Faraday's laws). Grading is based on hour exams, problem sets, and a final examination.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry, by Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, 5th edition, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole Publishing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 261. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Anthony Francis (afrancis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). CHEM 261 is intended primarily for Chemical Engineering students. No credit granted for students that have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://sitemaker.umich.edu/chem260_fall02

CHEM 261 is an introduction to the quantal nature of matter (the Schrödinger equation and the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics) and the fundamental principles necessary to understand spectroscopy (electronic, vibrational, and rotational). CHEM 261 is intended for Chemical Engineering students. This course, together with Chem Engin 330, provides the prerequisites necessary for enrollment in CHEM 302. Grading is based on problem sets and one hour exam. CHEM 261 meets only for the first third of the term.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry, by Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, 5th edition, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole Publishing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 261. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Lohr (llohr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). CHEM 261 is intended primarily for Chemical Engineering students. No credit granted for students that have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://sitemaker.umich.edu/chem260_fall02

CHEM 261 is an introduction to the quantal nature of matter (the Schrödinger equation and the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics) and the fundamental principles necessary to understand spectroscopy (electronic, vibrational, and rotational). CHEM 261 is intended for Chemical Engineering students. This course, together with Chem Engin 330, provides the prerequisites necessary for enrollment in CHEM 302. Grading is based on problem sets and one hour exam. CHEM 261 meets only for the first third of the term.

TEXT: Principles of Modern Chemistry, by Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, 5th edition, ISBN 0030353734, Brooks/Cole Publishing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 302. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure, Reactivity, and Function.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Mark Banaszak Holl (mbanasza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 260 (or CHEM 261 and CHE 330). (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem302/

This course in Inorganic Chemistry is intended to introduce students to the properties of the elements and the compounds that they form. The course should be elected by students concentrating in chemistry, chemical engineering, or cell and molecular biology.

This course will provide an introduction to the structure and properties of those elements other than carbon. Topics that will be included are the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and extended solids, bonding, periodicity, main group and transition element chemistry, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry.

TEXT: Inorganic Chemistry, Miessler, ISBN 0138418918, Prentice Hall. Solutions Manual to Inorganic Chemistry, Miessler, ISBN 0139192425, Prentice Hall.

CHEM 302 will meet for one hour, three times each week with a senior faculty member and once a week with a graduate student instructor in groups of approximately 25. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 312. Synthesis and Characterization.

Section 100, 300.

Instructor(s): Arthur Ashe (ajashe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 302. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

CHEM 312 introduces students to advanced techniques used in the synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds. It is a course designed to serve as a transition between laboratory and research laboratory work. The course emphasizes methods for handling air-sensitive material such as organometallics compounds, and includes syringe techniques, working under vacuum or inert gas atmospheres, vacuum distillations as well as various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The course meets in two four-hour laboratory periods. Some of that time may be used for discussion of techniques and principles. Grades are based on laboratory performance, written reports, and examinations.

TEXT: Structure Determination of Organic Compounds, Pretsch, ISBN 3540678158, Springer Verlag.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 398. Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, and permission of a biochemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits during junior or senior year.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/undergrad/research.html

Elected starting in the junior or senior year, this course is an optional requirement for Biochemistry students and a requirement for Honors Biochemistry students, who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. The student is expected to put in a minimum of three hours a week of actual work for each credit elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Chemistry Advising Office (1500 Chemistry), and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for CHEM 398 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in CHEM 218.

For a student to receive biochemistry credit for CHEM 398, the student must work on a research project supervised by a member of the biochemistry concentration research faculty and the project must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the biochemistry research faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 399. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, and permission of a chemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits during junior or senior year.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/undergrad/research.html

Elected starting in the junior or senior year, this course is a requirement for B.S. Chemistry students, who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for each credit elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Chemistry Advising Office, and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for CHEM 399 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in CHEM 219.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for CHEM 399, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 402. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Vincent Pecoraro (vlpec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 302, and 461/462. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem402/

CHEM 402 is a second-term course in inorganic chemistry at the undergraduate level. The goals of the course are two-fold. On the one hand, it will build upon the concepts presented in the earlier course. Topics included here will emphasize the interrelations of ideas presented earlier in the curriculum. For example, discussion can include the relation between oxidation and reduction and acidity, periodic trends in acids and bases, the relation of hard and soft ideas to molecular orbital theory, periodic trends in standard reduction potentials, the relation of molecular structure to conductivity and magnetism. The key topics to be covered in this portion of the course include acid-base chemistry, theories of bonding, periodic properties and d-metal complexes. The course goes on to cover additional topics selected from issues in catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, structure-property relations, solid state chemistry, organometallic chemistry, kinetics of organometallic reactions, f-block compounds, electron deficient clusters, and quantum models of structure and bonding. The course has three lectures per week. There will be 1-3 exams and a final. Weekly homework problems will be assigned.

TEXT:

  • Chemical Applications of Group Theory, Cotton, ISBN 0471510947, (Required);
  • Inorganic Chemistry, Atkins, Shriver, 2nd edition, ISBN 0716736341, Freeman (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 447. Physical Methods of Analysis.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Zhan Chen (zhanc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 260 and 241/242. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/447/001.nsf

This course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chromatographic separation techniques, and contemporary electroanalytical chemistry are stressed. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced.

TEXT: Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 5th Edition, Skoog, ISBN 0030020786.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 451 / BIOLCHEM 451. Introduction to Biochemistry I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Carol Fierke (fierke@umich.edu), Nils Walter (nwalter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 260; BIOLOGY 162; and MATH 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/451/100.nsf

This course is the first in a two-term sequence designed for biochemistry concentrators. Emphasis is on developing the capacity of the students to think about complex biological processes in terms of the underlying chemistry. An introductory section on proteins is followed by sections on enzymes and coenzymes. The discussion of biochemical energetics includes sections on glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, photosynthesis, and carbohydrate metabolism. The course has three lectures and one discussion per week. There are three hour exams and a final exam.

TEXT: Biochemistry (special package) by Voet, ISBN 04701325821, Wiley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 570.100.

Instructor(s): Roseanne Sension (rsension@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 260, PHYSICS 240 (or 260), and MATH 215. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/461/100.nsf

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence CHEM 260/461/463. CHEM 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in CHEM 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3 dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

TEXT:

  • Explorations in Physical Chemistry, Atkins, ISBN 071674998X, WH Freeman.
  • Physical Chemistry, McQuarrie, ISBN 0935702997, University Science Books.
  • Quantum Reality, Herbert, ISBN 0385235690, Anchor.
  • Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, Barrante, ISBN 0137417373, Prentice Hall, (not required).

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 462, 1 credit) in the same term that CHEM 461 is taken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I.

Section 200 Meets with Chemistry 570.200.

Instructor(s): David Lubman (dmlubman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 260, PHYSICS 240 (or 260), and MATH 215. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section is designed to introduce students to a more thorough, research-oriented view of Physical Chemistry. Required for Honors Chemistry concentrators.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence CHEM 260/461/463. CHEM 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in CHEM 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

TEXT:

  • Physical Chemistry, McQuarrie, ISBN 0935702997, University Science Books.
  • Problems & Solutions Manual, Cox, ISBN 0935702431, University Science Books.
  • Atomic Sprectra & Atomic Structure, Gerhard, ISBN 0486601153, Dover Publications.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 462, 1 credit) in the same term that CHEM 461 is taken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Roseanne Sension (rsension@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 461. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/462/100.nsf

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in CHEM 461.

TEXT:

  • Explorations in Physical chemistry, Atkins, ISBN 071674998X, WH Freeman.
  • Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, Barrante, ISBN 0137417373, Prentice Hall (not required).
  • Molecular Modeling, Leach, ISBN 0582382106, Prentice Hall (not required).

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the first term of Physical Chemistry (CHEM 461, 3 credits) in the same term that CHEM 462 is taken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 463. Physical Chemistry II.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 575.100.

Instructor(s): Raoul Kopelman (kopelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 461/462. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the third of the three term physical chemistry sequence CHEM 260/461/463 and builds on material presented in both previous courses. The rigorous mathematical theory of classical thermodynamics will be developed, including applications to entropy, heat engines, solution properties, and phase and chemical equilibria. Modern statistical thermodynamics will be introduced. Modern theories of fundamental reaction rates will be used build on the phenomenological kinetics introduced in CHEM 260. Methods for determining and understanding solid state structures will be discussed, building on group theory introduced in CHEM 461.

TEXT: Physical Chemistry, Castellan, 3rd edition, ISBN 0201103869, Addison-Wesley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 467 / GEOSCI 465 / AOSS 467. Biogeochemical Cycles.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Anne Carroll (mcarroll@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 116, CHEM 210, and PHYSICS 240 (or 260). (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/aoss/467/001.nsf

Biogeochemical cycles describe how carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other elements cycle through not only the atmosphere, the oceans, and the landmasses of the earth. This course is useful to students in many fields including engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry, biology, geology, natural resources, and public health. The biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur; the atmosphere and oceans as reservoirs and reaction media; the fate of natural and human-made sources of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds; the interactions among major biogeochemical cycles and resultant global change: greenhouse gases, acid rain, and ozone depletion.

TEXT: Global Environment: Water, Air, and Geochemical Cycles, Berner and Berner, Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 480. Physical and Instrumental Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Hashim Al-Hashimi

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 447 and 461/462; and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 463. (3). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores methods for the measurement of the physical and spectroscopic properties of substances and the application of these methods in instrumental analysis. The course is focused on essential laboratory principles and operations as they relate to the physicochemical properties of organic, inorganic, and macromolecular chemical species. Experiments study the areas of equilibria, chemical structure, chemical change, and computer simulation and calculation. Emphasis is placed on the effective design of experiments together with synergistic coupling of modern instrumentation and computers. The course includes literature searches for physical data. Laboratory reports constitute an important component of the course. Ten to twelve hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance, laboratory records, and reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 485. Projects Laboratory.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Arthur Ashe (ajashe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 480. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A project oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term. The projects are suggested by the faculty of the department and require library as well as laboratory work. The projects may be in any area of inorganic or organic chemistry. Eight hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance and a written report for each project undertaken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 485. Projects Laboratory.

Section 300.

Instructor(s): Arthur Ashe (ajashe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 480. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A project oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term. The projects are suggested by the faculty of the department and require library as well as laboratory work. The projects may be in any area of inorganic or organic chemistry. Eight hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance and a written report for each project undertaken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 485. Projects Laboratory.

Section 400.

Instructor(s): Hashim Al-Hashimi

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 480. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A project oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term. The projects are suggested by the faculty of the department and require library as well as laboratory work. The projects may be in any area of analytical or physical chemistry. Eight hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance and a written report for each project undertaken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 485. Projects Laboratory.

Section 500.

Instructor(s): Hashim Al-Hashimi

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 480. (2). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A project oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term. The projects are suggested by the faculty of the department and require library as well as laboratory work. The projects may be in any area of biophysical chemistry. Eight hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance and a written report for each project undertaken.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 498. Undergraduate Honors Thesis in Biochemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 398 and permission of instructor. To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis on undergraduate research. (1). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To be elected in the term in which an Honors biochemistry student presents a thesis on undergraduate research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 499. Undergraduate Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 399 and permission of instructor. To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis on undergraduate research. (1). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To be elected in the term in which an Honors chemistry student presents a thesis on undergraduate research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 507. Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Marc Johnson (mjaj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 461. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Structural concepts relating to inorganic and organometallic compounds, inorganic stereochemistry, crystal chemistry, point symmetry, ligand field theory, MO theory, catalysis, and generalizations about the periodic table.

TEXT: Symmetry and Structure, by S.F.A. Kettle, 2nd Edition, 1995, Wiley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 511 / MATSCIE 510. Materials Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): M. David Curtis (mdcurtis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course presents concepts in Materials Chemistry. The main topics include (a) a survey of characterization methods appropriate for solid state materials, including XRD, PES, STM, AFM, SIMS, and thermal methods, (b) syntheses of representative materials, e.g., ceramics via sol-gel, conjugated polymers, inorganic and coordination solids, and nanostructured materials, and (c) materials properties, including electrical, optical, and magnetic behavior, and how these properties are related to molecular and solid state structure.

TEXT:

  • Solid State Chemistry, an Introduction, Smart & Moore, 1995 (2nd Ed. paperback), ISBN: 0412622203, Stanley Thornes Publishing Ltd.
  • Properties of Solids: The Physics of the Chemical Bond, Harrison, 1989, ISBN 0486660214, Dover Publications.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 525 / MCDB 525. Chemical Biology I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Nils Walter (nwalter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 451, 452, 461, and 463. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/chem/525/001.nsf

This is the first of a two course sequence in Chemical Biology. The intent of these courses is to introduce students to the breadth of material contained within the inherently interdisciplinary "Chemical Biology" arena. The course has been designed to cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries of Chemistry. Thus, rather than having traditional bioorganic, bioinorganic, and biophysical sections, the course will focus on case studies chosen so that over the course of the two-term sequence, all of the key concepts in the traditional chemical disciplines are discussed.

TEXT:

  • Structure & Mechanism in Protein Science: Guide to Enzyme Catalysis & Protein Folding, Fersht, ISBN 0716732688, WH Freeman;
  • Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry, Lippard, ISBN 0935702725, University Science Books;
  • Nucleic Acids: Structures, Properties, & Functions, Bloomfield, ISBN 0935702490, University Science Books;
  • Biochemistry, 1998 Supplement & Solutions Manual, Voet, ISBN 0471326860, Wiley (not required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 538 / MACROMOL 538. Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Adam Matzger (matzger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 215/216, and 230 or 260. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chemistry of monomer and polymer synthesis; Mechanistic analysis of reactions. Stereochemistry of polymer structures both natural and synthetic. Scope of subject matter: free radical and ionic polymerization, condensation polymerization, ring opening and nonclassical polymerization. Special topics from the recent literature.

TEXT: Polymers: Chemistry and Physics of Modern Materials, Cowie, ISBN 0748740732, Intl Specialized Book Service (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 540. Organic Principles.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Gary Glick (gglick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 312 and 461. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis. The important types of organic reactions are discussed. Basic principles are emphasized; relatively little attention is paid to the scope and synthetic applications of the reactions.

TEXT:

  • Advanced Organic Chemistry: Structure & Mechanism, Carey, ISBN 0306462435, Kluwer;
  • Mechanism & Theory in Organic Chemistry, Lowry, ISBN 0060440848, Addison Wesley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 461.100.

Instructor(s): Roseanne Sension (rsension@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 461 and 463. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 461.100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry.

Section 200 Meets with Chemistry 461.200.

Instructor(s): David Lubman (dmlubman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 461 and 463. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 461.200.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 575. Chemical Thermodynamics.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 463.100.

Instructor(s): Raoul Kopelman (kopelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CHEM 461. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 463.100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for CHEM.


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