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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Civilization


This page was created at 7:44 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


CLCIV 101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin B Acosta-Hughes (bacosta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Do these famous lines from Greek literature make you curious? "My name is Nobody" Odysseus' verbal trick which helps him escape from the monstrous Cyclops in Homer's Odyssey. "I would rather stand three times in the front lines of battle than give birth once" Medea in Euripides' tragedy Medea. "It was a democracy in name, but in reality it was the rule of one man" the historian Thucydides, writing about Pericles' leadership of the Athenian democracy. "The unexamined life is not worth living" Socrates in Plato's Apology.

Do you know the answers to these puzzling questions? Why did the Athenian democracy put its most famous intellectual (Socrates) to death? What would happen if the women of ancient Greece went on a sex strike? What was the penalty for adultery in Ancient Athens? Why did the Ancient Greeks develop the first democracies in history?

If these sayings and questions make you curious, then consider signing up for Classical Civilization 101: The Ancient Greek World. No previous knowledge is required. This course serves as an introduction to the literature, art, and archaeology of this fascinating but paradoxical civilization. We will laugh with the ancient comedians and think with the ancient philosophers. We will also confront the contradictions of this complex society. For instance, we will examine why women were kept out of politics, but were featured so prominently in one of the most political forms of entertainment (drama). We will also ask how the Greeks reconciled their strong belief in freedom with their willingness to own slaves.

There will be approximately 50 pages of reading per week, two short papers, a midterm and a final examination. Students who enroll in this course may choose to take the companion course, Classical Civilization 102: The Ancient Roman World (offered in the Winter Term). Students who complete this sequence are encouraged to consider a concentration in Classical Studies. Visit the Classics Undergraduate website at: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/undergrad

Course Webpages: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/cc/101/index.html

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 Death, Dying, and the Dead in the Ancient World.

Instructor(s): Basil J Dufallo (dufallo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Mortality joins us closely to the ancient Greeks and Romans, as to all human beings. But the ways death makes people think and act distinguish them from each other as do few other aspects of human culture. This course will examine Greco-Roman views of death, dying, and the dead in an effort to bring us closer to two of the Western world's greatest and most influential civilizations. We will look at a broad range of evidence, from tombs and burials to religious rituals to tragic plays to murder trials to philosophy. We will also consider our own beliefs and practices concerning death, and use the insights of modern disciplines such as anthropology to help us draw connections between our present and the ancient past. How do social factors such as gender, age, and status determine the way a culture responds to death? Conversely, what can cultural responses to death tell us about central aspects of ancient (and modern) societies? Assignments will include a short initial paper, a major term paper, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 002 From Slapstick to David Letterman: Comedy in Ancient Athens.

Instructor(s): Arthur Verhoogt (verhoogt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clciv/120/002.nsf

Ancient Greek comedy covers everything from farcical action to societal and political satire. During this course students will read comedies in translation and discuss the Athenians' sense of humor (if any) and the various aspects of the daily life and political affairs illustrated by the comedies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 215. Ovid.

Mini course beginning Oct. 22 (Drop/Add deadline=November 4).

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU).

Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rscodel/ovid.html

Ovid has been among the most influential writers in the European literary tradition, and he is one of the most enjoyable authors in the canon. This mini-seminar will examine both the original contexts of his works and what he has meant for later readers, with emphasis on the love poetry and the "Metamorphoses." Themes will include his treatment of women and sexuality, his narrative technique and wit, his relationships with Augustus and with Roman power, his presentation of self, and whatever aspects the group finds most interesting. We will look at both recent adaptations, including Ted Hughes' "Tales from Ovid" and the collection "After Ovid," and Elizabethan translations, including Golding's "Metamorphoses" (which Shakespeare used) and Christopher Marlowe's "Amores." We will also look (briefly) at paintings based on Ovidian themes from the Renaissance to the present. There will be two short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CLCIV 381(457) / RELIGION 381. Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Derek Collins (dbcollin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon, and survey the theories that have been advanced to explain it. Given the enormous size of the topic, we will necessarily concentrate on selected aspects of witchcraft, especially as they form part of a larger social process.

We will begin by looking at witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives that involve non-European traditions (sub-Saharan African traditions in particular), which emphasize the role of witchcraft accusation and resolution in the formation of community. We will then look at many examples of classical and medieval witchcraft, magic, and demonology in history and literature, with an emphasis on the pre-modern history of official attitudes toward witchcraft in Europe and especially the changing views of secular and religious authorities toward witchcraft in the late medieval period. Finally, we will examine the "witchcraze" of the early modern period in Europe and America and survey the possible reasons for it. This will include a close scrutiny of witchcraft cases from Scotland, Sweden, and America (Salem Village). Some attention will be paid to the changing image of the witch as portrayed in the folklore, literature, art, and films of Europe and America. We shall also look briefly at contemporary witchcraft viewed as a religious system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 388 / PHIL 388. History of Philosophy: Ancient.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One Philosophy Introduction. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rkamteka/Philosophy388.html

See Philosophy 388.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CLCIV 456. Egypt after the Pharaohs: Public and Private Life in an Ancient Multicultural Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Traianos Gagos (traianos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to study a major ancient culture that is not consistently represented in the traditional core curriculum for the study of ancient Mediterranean societies. The focus is reversed towards one of the major ancient cultures that has fascinated both the ancient super-powers of Greece and Rome and the moderns alike with its peculiar gods and mysterious religious practices. Our study will move beyond anachronistic stereotypes to deal with Egypt as an ancient multicultural society where Egyptians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Jews, and other cultural groups co-existed for more than a millennium. In a time of rapid change the study of civilizations with roots radically different from our own can provide an interesting form of reorientation. And a multicultural society, such as Egypt, that managed to survive for centuries on principles we no longer share presents something of a challenge. Egypt offers great advantages in the exploration of what we want to think of as "contemporary" issues, such as ethnicity, class, gender, and social mobility. The arid climate of the desert has preserved several thousands of documents on papyrus in Greek, Egyptian, and other alphabets, which span over a millennium after the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great. The survival of such a corpus of "raw" data provides a unique gateway for an intimate look into the spheres of public and private life in Egypt, the complexity of the Egyptian culture, and its interface with the Greeks and the Romans, as well as modes of reaction to foreign rule. Egypt was the oldest and most prestigious culture known to the Greeks, and it impressed many of the ancient Greek writers. This course has an exemplary rather than a comprehensive aim: after an historical and geographic orientation, the study will proceed with case studies in a diachronic form on concrete themes such as life in the towns and the countryside, ethnicity, gender, religion, army and administration, social mobility. The planned readings will include recent secondary work as well as primary texts in translation. Requirements will include three critical papers of 6-10 pages each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated two times for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for CLCIV.


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