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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 7:45 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


COMPLIT 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Representing the Other in Colonial Europe.

Instructor(s): Nirmala Singh-Brinkman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did writers and painters from France and Britain depict the native inhabitants of European colonies in the nineteenth century? What role did these representations play in the production of literary and visual art during the colonial era? How did representations of the "colonized other" abroad shape depictions of those who were marginalized within European society? In this course we will pay special attention to representations of women and other voiceless or powerless figures such as servants, foreigners, and criminals. We will also focus on how representations of the Other provoked competing points of view in literature and painting. This course will concentrate on a selection of literary works that portray otherness from a European point of view, including Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Carmen by Prosper Mirimie, The Spanish Gypsy by George Eliot, and Nana by Imile Zola. We will also examine excerpts from travel writings, scenes from the opera Carmen by Georges Bizet, and nineteenth-century paintings such as Olympia and Nana by Idouard Manet. Lastly, we will consider how otherness is figured from an "outside" point of view in Women of Algiers in their Apartment by Assia Djibar and in a comparison between Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe and Friday by Michel Tournier.

Our class discussions will draw from supporting materials by Edward Said, Sander Gilman, T.J. Clark, Thiophile Gautier, Jerrold Seigel, and Franz Fanon.

Students will be asked to write two-page reaction papers, one for each primary text, as well as a final paper in two drafts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 240. Introduction to Comparative Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colás (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why read? Why live? Do the two questions have the same answers? What does reading have to do with living? In this course, we will take these questions as a framework through which to approach comparative literature as something people study and as a way they study it. But wait, there's more! The books you read, the thoughts you think, and the words you hear, speak, and write will slip under your skin with excruciating sweetness. They might make you feel itchy and uncomfortable. It may be difficult to walk and talk normally. You may begin to hear voices and to tell stories. I promise… But only if you do the reading (which will include work by authors such as Cortazar, Borges, McCullers, Puig, Suzuki, Nietzsche, Marx, Shelley, Oliver, and Snyder), writing (weekly short papers, one or two longer essays), talking, and thinking (constantly). Lecture Monday 10:00 TO 11:00 DISCUSSION SECTIONS OF 240 WILL MEET BEGINNING WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 9TH.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 260. Europe and Its Others.

Section 001 – Race, Racism, and Ethnicity in the Francophone World. Meets with Honors 251.002

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will begin with discussions of colonization as a crucial historical point in order to contextualize questions of race, racism, ethnicity, gender, and class intolerance which result in instances of inequality in what is now called the Francophone world. Texts and films selected (all in English translation) will deal, on the one hand, with issues of race, racism, and ethnicity with special reference to the context of French speaking countries in Europe and their former colonies; and, on the other, with cultural diversity and its productions. An attempt will be made to compare issues involving race, racism, ethnicity, gender, and class in different parts of the French speaking world.

Lectures and discussions will emphasize issues of religion (e.g. Muslims in Francophone countries) of gender and of social class within specific ethnic communities as well as between ethnic groups (e.g., North Africans versus West Africans; Asians versus Africans; European ethnic groups versus other ethnic groups) and the hegemonic societies involved e.g., France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Quebec.

Taught in English. All reading material and films are in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 364. Comparative Literary Movements and Periods.

Section 001 – Modernism, Magical Realism and Postmodernism.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is devoted to the study of literary works that are inextricably linked to specific literary movements such as modernism, magical realism and postmodernism. We will compare novels and short stories across various geographical regions and discuss some of the shifts in the literature of the 20th century. Special attention is paid to Marcel Proust, Gertrude Stein, Franz Kafka, Virginia Woolf, Thomas Mann, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Màrquez, Latife Tekin, Italo Calvino, and Orhan Pamuk.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 376. Literature and Ideas.

Section 001 – Freud and Literature.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce you to some of the major works by Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis and a masterful writer in his own right. It may lead you to appreciate him as an innovative theorist of interpretation, a skillful reader/interpreter of anything ranging from hysteric symptoms to the so-called great works of literature, including the Bible. In the course of reading Freud, you will become familiar with certain widely circulated but poorly understood, highly technical psychoanalytic concepts – for example, "the unconscious," "repression," "perversion," "Oedipus complex," "penis envy," and "fetishism."

The reading will include: The Interpretation of Dreams; Totem and Taboo; Moses and Monotheism; Case History of the Wolf-Man; Screen Memories; Moses of Michelangelo; The Uncanny; Dreams and Telepathy; and others. We will also view several feature-length films from the latter half of the 20th century in order to explore the impact of psychoanalysis on popular culture of our time: "Spellbound" (Hitchcock film; a murder mystery is solved by psychoanalysis); "Seven-Percent Solution" (Freud treats Sherlock Holmes' drug addiction); "Zelig" (Woody Allen film about "human chameleon" and his lovely analyst).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 495. Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 – Introduction to Theory and Criticism.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and concentration in Comparative Literature. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to introduce Senior concentrators, and other interested students, to some critical terms used in contemporary literary theory and criticism, that are of importance to the comparative study of literature. Lentricchia and McLaughlin?s anthology, Critical Terms for Literary Study [ital.] (2nd ed.), will serve as our basic, companion book, for the discussion of critical key-terms, such as "Discourse," "Narrative," "Author," "Culture," "Ideology," "Imperialism/Nationalism," "Gender," "Desire," "Class," etc. In addition, we will read a selection of some classic texts of twentieth century literary theory. These selections will be mostly assigned on an ad hoc basis, depending on the needs of class discussions, and on the individual research plans, toward the writing of the final, substantive seminar paper. For some students, the paper will form the basis for an Honors Thesis. Students will be required to present their projects, and discuss them in class, during the latter half of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 496. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 498. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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