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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 5:22 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Literature and Evil.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Death is the sanction of everything that the storyteller can tell" (Walter Benjamin)

Since September 11, 2000, there has been a tendency for students of literature and culture to conceive acts of violence and evil as large monumental events that demand big universal narratives. But the relationship between literature and violence is often subtle and discrete, characterized by what Hannah Arendt called "the banality of evil." In this course we will examine how some of the most violent and evil events of the modern period – slavery, colonialism, totalitarianism, and the holocaust – have affected the nature of story telling in general and the novel in particular. Drawing on a diversity of authors and traditions, we will examine how literature deals with themes of violence, dislocation, and death, and how evil acts determine the inner language of literature and its overall moral or ethical claims. We will read works by Franz Kafka, Toni Morrison, Anita Desai, B. Mukerjee, Ferdinand Oyono, Mulk Raj Anand, Alex La Guma, Andre Brink, and Nadine Gordimer. Course requirements include weekly responses, two papers, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 – The Making of Race, The Making of Fiction. Meets with Afroamerican and Caribbean Studies 104.002.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will discuss close readings and critical analyses of a variety of fictional texts that engage with historical and contemporary understandings of race in the U.S. Through a combination of fiction writers from 19th and 20th centuries, including Octavia Butler, Herman Melville, Toni Morrison, and Mark Twain, we will explore genre and narrative elements in order to assess how these texts say what they say about slavery, racial identity, history, and literature. For example, how have U.S. writers shaped their diverse fictions in response to the debates over the meanings of race? And how have these meanings changed over time? In addition to seminar discussion, class assignments will include intensive writing work in the form of short responses, peer review of drafts, and paper revisions.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages is required.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001 – Unpacking Formality: Writing & Reading Structure.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher (ifulcher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will pick apart classic structures that hold together poems and stories. There are reasons that a Shakespearian sonnet has fourteen lines and rhymes. There is a pacing to the development of characters in short fiction. In both cases, a specific form is chosen (or created) to house the idea driving the project. Your writing in class may be influenced by the forms encountered, and you will be encouraged to experiment both with classic forms and components thereof. Your writing will consist of both poems and short stories revised through in-class workshops.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Carrie-Sue Sulzer (kayc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our class will help you develop the art of creative writing, through practice, reading, and discussion. Much of our in-class time will be dedicated to collaborative workshopping of your stories and poems. In addition to student writing, we will discuss various published works. Over the course of the term, students will be required to produce two polished stories and five poems. Grades will be based on the quality of your writing, class attendance, and participation in workshops.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Sara Houghteling (shoughte@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore different approaches to incorporating the visual arts and music into fiction and poetry. How is a story or a poetic narrative augmented by a connection to art? What kinds of technical, visual, aural, and historical knowledge do we need in order to incorporate art or music into our creative writing? What are the ways to make an outside artistic source an organic part of a story or poem?

A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages will be required. Class texts may include Carole Maso's The Art Lover, Vikram Seth's An Equal Music, Cole Swensen's See, and Jeanette Winterson's Art Objects.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004 – Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?

Instructor(s): Michelle Turner (mmturner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? This story title by Joyce Carol Oates asks the question we will be asking each other and ourselves. No matter where we are going or where we have been, we all have unique perspectives, and thus, something valuable to say. We might view the world the way the poet Charles Wright does when he writes, "How deeper than elsewhere the dusk is in your own yard." The primary aim of this course will be to write poems and short stories that are well crafted, meaningful, and confidently individual. To develop the freshest creative fodder for each of us, we will explore and challenge our inclinations and fascinations, and reconsider what we do and do not write. Along with content and theme, we will consider craft issues such as voice, character, structure, and of course, the intricacies of language itself. Students will read and discuss the works of established authors, complete informal writing exercises, and attend at least two public readings. Above all, this course will be structured around the workshop of students' own poems and short stories. Requirements include a portfolio of approximately 7-10 pages of poetry and 15-20 pages of prose.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005 – Introduction to Fiction & Drama Writing.

Instructor(s): David Morse (morsedl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It has been said that the essential difference between "popular" and "literary" fiction lies in the author's emphasis. In "popular" fiction, it is argued, the author begins with a story (or a plot - we'll discuss the differences between these two) and then concocts characters who will "enact" this story to the author's satisfaction. In "literary" fiction, it is argued, this process is reversed - the author begins with one or more complex characters, places them together in a situation or series of situations, and allows the clash of their personalities to dictate what will be the fiction's course of events. While understanding that such cut-and-dried distinctions inevitably fail, we will nevertheless begin this study of the art of fiction and drama writing with these distinctions in mind. We will look at several already published works of both fiction and drama, attempting to ascertain the author's focus - plot or character - and then determine how this focus shaped the work as a whole, and how the two may overlap. Most classroom time, however, will be devoted to discussion of student writing. Students will experiment writing their own drama and fiction from both a plot- and a character-based perspective, gaining a better sense of the advantages and disadvantages of both. While the interplay between plot and character will remain at the forefront of discussions throughout the course, other elements of craft, such as structure/form, voice/style, use of dialogue and setting, will also be considered. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 30-50 manuscript pages will be required, consisting of both fiction and drama.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Josie Kearns (jakearns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Andrew Cohen (cohenad@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the writing of both fiction and drama. Most class time will be devoted to the discussion of student work. However, we will also discuss the works of established authors, the writing process, and various elements of writing, including voice, tone, dialogue, and form. Students will be asked to read and thoughtfully critique each others' work, to actively participate in class discussions, and to complete exercises meant to both spark creativity and develop a sensitivity to language and detail. A final portfolio of revised completed work of 35-50 manuscript pages is required.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Marika Ismail (mismail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students who are interested in actively exploring the genres of poetry and prose through a series of intensive readings, writing assignments and class discussions. Your participation is essential, and therefore mandatory. The first part of the term will be devoted to poetry, the second to prose, and we will use the prose poem as a bridge between them. Our readings will focus mainly, though not solely, on contemporary writers such as Anne Carson, Stephen Dunn, and Nancy Reisman and we will also read Richard Hugo's "The Triggering Town." Your final portfolio will consist of 8-10 revised poems and 15-20 pages of prose. Prose poems can be included as part of either genre, to be negotiated upon request.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): John Bishop (jpbishop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section of 223 will focus on drama and fiction (specifically the short story), examining the differences inherent to each style while endeavoring to understand how the study of both can inform fiction and dramatic writing. What techniques are shared by both drama and fiction? How does the role of voice and plot change as we move from one medium to another? Special attention will be paid to narrative voice as well as the themes of betrayal and alienation. Published plays and short stories will be read and discussed, but the majority of class time will be spent critiquing peer work. A final portfolio of a minimum of 30 pages in either or both mediums will be required at the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Angela Lea (alea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to sharpen your instincts as writers and readers of poetry and fiction. Although much of our class time will be spent considering each other's original work, we will also engage with pieces by other authors, with an eye toward partially uncovering what makes writing "work" along various dimensions - including the formal, the stylistic, the structural, the conceptual, and the musical. Students should come away with a deeper and broader sense of writing as a craft, a legacy, an art, and an instrument. Tangible requirements for this course include a portfolio, a minimum of 35 pages long, of carefully considered works-in-progress, to be turned in at the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Aric Knuth (aknuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We can all write stories and poems because we are all human beings with the capacity to (a) communicate both with and without language, and (b) feel and intuit emotion in other people with whom we have contact or whom we watch in contact with other people. The strange business of writing has mostly to do with these two ideas - language and emotion. The deepest and (we can imagine, though who knows) darkest pitfall for the writer has to do with forgetting how language and emotion are connected in real life. When we forget this connection, we tend to think about how language and emotion connect in un real life, or sur real life, all of which can be fine in terms of what we can put in a text, but is not necessarily fine in terms of the reading of a text, because of the process of person X reading story Y or poem Z will always happen in real life and not un real or sur real life, and so the connection between emotion and language that a text calls upon must be real and original and not fake and presupposed. But we know things like "lake," "cold," "bone," "heartbeat," "wild animal," "running," "blue waterglass," "halfmoon," "breath," "scarecrow," "stone cottage," "stomach cramp," "lover," "window pane," and "flash of swamplight," and we know what these things make us think and feel, and we know how arranging them this way and that can make us think and feel these things and those things.

My introductory course in creative writing, which will result in a final portfolio containing 20-25 pages of fiction and 8-10 poems, will immerse students in a set of numerous and rigorous writing exercises as well as a number of in-class experiments geared toward exploring the connection between language and emotion as well as the connection between powerful writing and the particular and strange details and observations of real life.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Ian Stuart Twiss (reedtwis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of writing in two genres, poetry and fiction. Attention will be paid to the specific techniques of these genres, with an underlying emphasis on that most fundamental issue that all writers must face: finding material that matters and having the courage to write honestly about it. Students are therefore encouraged to take emotional risks in their work, to write about material that they find compelling, and maybe even a little scary, to explore. The class operates on the premise that this is ultimately the most fulfilling kind of work to do, for you and for your reader. For my part, I pledge to provide you with a classroom space that provides encouragement and safety for this kind of exploration. The primary emphasis will be on student work and on the workshop (a class discussion that will provide constructive feedback to encourage strengths and strengthen weaknesses in your work). In addition, I will provide individual feedback on all work. We will also read and discuss published poetry and fiction, mostly contemporary, examining it for what it can teach us about craft, emotion, and honesty as well as for inspiration. Class requirements include both a poetry and a fiction portfolio of revised work; exercises, workshops, and readings as assigned; attendance at two public readings during the term; and active participation in class discussions and activities. Bring your sense of humor, your willingness to seem weird, and your enthusiasm.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Jorge Sanchez (jorges@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the entire process of writing, from finding "inspiration" to answering the question, "When is a poem/story/piece 'finished'?" In the course of the semester, we will read work by established poets and fiction writers, engage in writing exercises (i.e., in-class collaborative writing, take-home assignments, etc.), write poems and short stories to be workshopped, and discuss revision. Students will be expected to write at least five poems and two short stories (ten pages each) during the term.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Carolyn R Stone (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Sean P Norton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Nick Harp (nharp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Jaswinder Bolina (jbolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on developing students' creative writing skills in the genres of short fiction and poetry. The first half of the term will be devoted to studying prose forms. We will read several short stories by prominent authors. Students will be expected to write 2-3 page response papers on two of the readings. Students will also be expected to turn in three short stories to be read and critiqued by the class. Two of the stories will be 3-5 pages in length with a third of 8-10 pages in length. The fiction portion of the workshop will conclude with a 15-20 page portfolio consisting of revisions of the stories turned in. The second half of the term will be dedicated to the writing of poetry. Students will be expected to turn in at least one new poem a week to be workshopped by the class. The poetry section will conclude with students handing in a final portfolio of revised poems that should be 12-15 pages in length. We will also read four books of poetry and students will be asked to write 2-3 page response papers on two of the books.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Nate Jones (nsjones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Creative writing is not the most natural of endeavors, and in developing our styles, we must treat writing as such. In this course, we will dedicate the first half of the term to poetry, the second half to fiction. Within each we will address the key concepts and tools necessary to actively create fiction and poetry. Enthusiastic participation and a series of exciting exercises will be essential to your development as well as mine. A midterm poetry portfolio and a final fiction portfolio will be required. It is key to understand that this course will focus on process rather than product, i.e., finished works are not so important as the revisionary path the student takes to get there.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s): Patrick O'Keeffe (ppo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We can begin by reading the works of established writers so that I can discover what stories and poems you enjoy; however, the focus in this class will always be on your ongoing work. With poetry, we will pay attention to both the lyric and the narrative; with fiction, we will examine such elements as scene, tone, and point-of-view. The rest is a mystery, and this is where you step in. The best writing is writing that pays attention to specifics.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Sharon Pomerantz (sjpomera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will look at the similarites and differences between drama and fiction and how the writing of one can in fact transition into the writing of the other. Here's what they share in common: plot, characterization, narrative tension, action, resolution, and the goal of what Aristotle called "the catharsis" - the reader or viewer coming away changed by the experience. I hope we will all come away from this course a little bit different, and that we will become a creative community, a safe place for each others' work.

Required Texts: Plays in One Act and You've Got to Read This.

Course Requirements: A mid-term requirement of a 10-15 page one-act play or group of short scenes, a final portfolio of 25-30 pages of fiction and/or drama with proof of revision, class participation and prompt completion of assignments, and the scheduling of one conference during my office hours.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Laura Krughoff (lkrughof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will work together as a community of writers as we unlock and explore your individual creative voice. Our primary emphasis will be on your own original writing, but we'll read a wide range of contemporary fiction and classic one acts to learn how others have practiced this craft. The term will begin with the writing of short scenes as we deepen our understanding of dramatic structure and hone the skills of dialogue and character development. We will then move on to short fiction as we marry strong dialogue to the vivid imagery and description of evocative prose. In short, this course will delve into the complexities of storytelling in two different forms, and by deepening our understanding of style, form and technique, we will explore the richness your creative work whether it's autobiographical or fully imagined, traditional or experimental.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced writing course focuses on the elements of evidence and argument. Unlike English 325 with its emphasis on exploration and style, English 225 encourages students to analyze the various components of a given issue and the writing conventions of different disciplines in order to explore and defend their positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. In the process, they will concentrate on the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the analysis and rigorous articulation of evidence in written discourse. The course stresses the compilation of strong evidence, specifically the use of outside sources and the smooth integration of such material into the prose of an essay. The readings are primarily non-fiction, and discussions and writing assignments emphasize considerations of style, rhetorical strategies, and revision as integral to precision in developing a line of argument for the purposes of reflection as well as persuasion.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002 – Ancient Reasons, Contemporary Arguments

Instructor(s): Jill Lamberton (lamberto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/225/002.nsf

While argumentation as a key to power is an ancient idea, it is certainly not an obsolete one. Argumentation has all kinds of influence in today's world. When people listen to or read your argument, it may be a way for them to clarify their own thinking on a given topic. Presenting good arguments is a way to influence the thinking and actions of others, for good or for ill. Because arguments can lead people to action, and because actions have the potential to be both good and bad, those who study argument are very concerned with the ethics of argument as well as the content, the words, of a given argument. The question of which arguments are ethical is grounded in an understanding of time, place, audience, and the goals of the person presenting the argument. The question of ethics rarely begins or ends in what is said, but always seeks to understand how, why, and to whom the something was said.

In this argumentative writing course, we will study some of the theories of argument that ancient rhetoricians outlined, asking always what can and should be said in a given case, in a given communion of writer (you), audience, and idea. We will do this following the assumption of the ancients that the power that resides in language is available to anyone who is willing to study rhetoric and work at the craft of argument.

This course will be a "workshop" course, where one of the primary texts will be the arguments that you and your classmates write. Other course requirements include regular attendance and class participation, three argumentative essays (drafts and revisions), and a final reflective portfolio.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Shawn Christian (shawnac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Tricia McElroy (mcelroyt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006, 013 – American Myths, American Values

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Land of opportunity." "Democracy." "All men are created equal." Phrases like these seem intrinsically "American" and have shaped our national identity for many years. Yet where do they come from, how have they changed, and why do we cling to them? What kind of America (and Americans) do they evoke? Whom do they include and exclude? In this course we will identify and analyze the ways in which traditional American myths and values have been developed and manipulated by public figures and organizations to change the way Americans live, learn, vote, shop, and worship, among other things. We will read historical and contemporary essays relating to these issues, as well as more practical essays on the art of persuasion, logic and argumentation. Students will be encouraged to scrutinize American popular culture, advertisements, political campaigns, and legal documents in order to form their own ideas and arguments about how American myths and values are manipulated in our culture. Students will write three persuasive essays that will require critical analysis, careful argumentation, and some outside research.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Valerie Goodwin (vgoodwin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/225/007.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Alexander Luria Ralph

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Tricia McElroy (mcelroyt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced writing course is designed to give students a rigorous introduction to the conventions of argument and to the composition of elegant and persuasive essays. Two principles inform these goals. First, the course adopts a broad view of the purposes of argumentation - that is, that argument can help us think through and clarify an issue or consider a range of perspectives. Second, this course assumes that to become a writer of a well-crafted argument, you must also hone your skills as a keen reader and thinker. By means of your required reading and our class discussions, you will learn not only to analyze the various components of a given issue but also to evaluate the effectiveness of rhetorical strategy and use of evidence. In turn, you will be asked to explore and articulate your own positions and beliefs in a variety of argumentative modes.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Jason Kirk (jckirk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 011 – Points of View: Personal Ideas / Social Action

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren (agbergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What makes writing persuasive enough so that you take notice? What does it take to change people's minds and perhaps even inspire them to act? To explore these questions we'll read classic persuasive writings such as Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as well as current literary, academic, and political writings and analyze the strategies different writers use. These writings will bring up a host of current issues and you can choose to write about those of particular interest to you, getting extensive feedback from readers as you explore different perspectives, construct extended arguments, test your evidence, question your assumptions, and search for ways to make your point of view clear, credible, and convincing. Writing requirements include exploratory drafts, freewritings, in-class exercises, reading responses, critiques of other students' drafts, and analyses of the writing process, resulting in a portfolio consisting of 25 pages of revised and polished essays.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Kirk Davis (daviskl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 013 – American Myths, American Values

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 225.006.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Paul Ching (pching@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/225/014.nsf

This course will explore intersections between "nature" and "nurture." Through reading and writing, we will examine the ways in which science and culture come to embody particular meanings for different people. The first part of the course will focus on the ways in "nature" is conceptualized. Some of the topics that we will examine include sociobiology, "feminine" and "masculine" forms of management, and racial superiority in sports. After analyzing the film Trading Places , we will move into the second part of the course, which will examine the individual's interaction with society in the book A Hope in the Unseen . Throughout this course, we will focus special attention on the ways in which race, class, and gender affect the individual and society.

The chief intent of this course, however, is to help you refine your skills as a writer. To that end, we will devote considerable time to developing revision skills, to reworking drafts and to critiquing your peers' work.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015 – Advocacy and the Ethics of Argument.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla (aballa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How can you speak on behalf of an Other – someone, some group, some thing or concept - without speaking over or around that Other? When events conflict with what you and others think is true, right, or best, what argumentative options do you have for voicing your concerns? And given our increasingly pluralist culture within this university and the nation, how can you express your beliefs in ways that compel rather than alienate your audience? In this course, we will explore what it means to argue ethically as we write in response to the plight of others. The relationship between ethics and argument is complex, for it requires that you think about a larger moral problem while keeping your own core beliefs firmly in mind; that you write in a way that does justice to those you represent; and that you address fairly the criticisms and values of others who disagree with you. Throughout the course, we will experiment with sophisticated uses of evidence, logic, style, and genre as we consider how writers across a range of disciplines (including philosophy, law, politics, journalism, business, and medicine) argue for their visions of justice. By examining the conventions of sound argument and the underlying assumptions of various audiences, you will practice appealing to appropriate authorities such that your voice, and most importantly, the voices of those on whose behalf you speak, are heard.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016, 020.

Instructor(s): Scott M Hutchins (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Karin Spirn (kspirn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): James Crane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will focus on techniques for achieving, organizing, and expressing an argument in expository essays. Because effective writing depends on interesting ideas, an emphasis on pre-writing methods will help you to develop a more persuasive style. Critical reading assignments involve the idea of democracy. Beginning with Machiavelli's The Prince, we will read and analyze essays on democratic government to help develop our own organizational skills. Daily readings, class discussions, and some brief writing assignments will provide structure for our weekly meetings. In addition to weekly assignments, the writing load for the course includes three short essays (5-6 pages), a research paper (15-18 pages), and written outlines of in-class presentations.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s): Pat Rubadeau (patruba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Scott M Hutchins (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Paul Douglas Barron (cescadel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 022 – Seeing the Forest AND the Trees.

Instructor(s): Julia S Carlson-Federhofer (jcarlson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Words are like trees: it is easy for a writer to get lost in them, particularly if he or she feels compelled to impress a reader. In this course, we will maintain sight of the forest - the main idea and its logical development in the essay - but we will not abandon our attention to the individual tree - the efficacy of the single word. Thus, for insight into the craft of argument, we will examine not only essays and articles but also poems - highly condensed forms that put pressure on the word. Readings about perception, misperception, error, accident, and imagination will receive most of our attention. We will devote class time to collaborative activities (discussion, peer revision, presentations) and individual efforts (pre-writing, impromptu compositions). Excellent attendance and animated participation are mandatory.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Krista Homicz (khomicz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/225/023.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Tricia McElroy (mcelroyt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced writing course is designed to give students a rigorous introduction to the conventions of argument and to the composition of elegant and persuasive essays. Two principles inform these goals. First, the course adopts a broad view of the purposes of argumentation - that is, that argument can help us think through and clarify an issue or consider a range of perspectives. Second, this course assumes that to become a writer of a well-crafted argument, you must also hone your skills as a keen reader and thinker. By means of your required reading and our class discussions, you will learn not only to analyze the various components of a given issue but also to evaluate the effectiveness of rhetorical strategy and use of evidence. In turn, you will be asked to explore and articulate your own positions and beliefs in a variety of argumentative modes.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025.

Instructor(s): Scott M Hutchins

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Does the visual only relate to pop culture? Can the visual be political, or manifest a political agenda? Can, in fact, vision be contested? How is that we see what is before our eyes? Through what filters established by culture do we assess, judge, and categorize what we see? This course will focus upon photography and film to explore these and many more questions. The course is divided into two units: family and crime. You will complete weekly reader responses (1 to 2 pages) examining major themes, characterizations and writing styles of the selected readings; one conversation paper; five formal essays (from 3 to 8 pages); and several in-class writing exercises. By the end of this course you should be able to write more clearly and confidently, and with increased complexity, about a range of texts and ideas.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030, 031.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Ralph D Story

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/225/032.nsf

English 225 (032) is designed to improve a student-writer's proficiency in persuasive discourse--argumentative writing which seeks to persuade a reader to a specific point of view by means of reason. Most often the subject matter of argumentative essays is controversial and contemporary; yet, the forms for the delivery of ideas on those topics you will be introduced to are quite classical. By the end of the semester the student-writer should be on the road to becoming an effective communicator, skilled in a number of literary techniques and, hopefully, be able to convey ideas in a precise, provocative, and logical manner. In the past, literature was used almost exclusively as model and inspirational catalyst for analyses and essays on topics in written form. In this course, student writing, professional non-fiction, popular culture, and, occasionally, literature will be employed as subject matter for discussions as well as in-class and out of class essays.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 033.

Instructor(s): Francesca Barbara Delbanco (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001, 003 – Writing for the Real World.

Instructor(s): Pat Rubadeau (patruba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/229/002.nsf

Although this course in entitled "Technical Writing," it is actually much more directed toward business or professional writing. We will talk about the differences between academic discourse and technical writing, keeping in mind that the two most important points of academic writing - audience and purpose – also apply here. To achieve the result you want from a business communication, you will need to know your audience and your purpose, and you will need to design your document(s) with your audience and purpose in mind. Class discussions and peer evaluations of your drafts will help you produce effective documents.

This course will focus in part on professional examples and in part on student writings which will be discussed in a workshop format. I do not plan to lecture at any great length, and you will not have to laboriously scribble notes during each class. Rather, we will have a term-long discussion about writing and, more importantly, about rewriting – the key to successful writing.

I am requiring you to keep a portfolio of your work in this course. You will submit this portfolio to me at the end of the term. I don't require portfolios in my other classes, but your polished and finished assignments will, most likely, be useful in the future. Assignments such as résumé writing, personal statements, and cover letters will be invaluable to you as you go out into the real world.

Because the class has a workshop component, be prepared to talk (when it's your turn, of course). Your participation in class discussion is vital. Vigorous (that is, helpful and friendly) discussion is not only fun but also a relatively painless way to learn. From our discussions, we (and I do mean we because I will be learning from you, my students) will learn not only about writing well but also about how our opinions and our styles of writing affect others in ways we might not previously have considered.

Finally, to successfully communicate, you must write with clarity and authority. To do so, you need to boost your receptive and productive vocabularies. In order to increase word recognition, all of you will periodically bring to class words from your various readings, words that have stumped you or that you needed contextual clues to understand. We as a class will define and discuss these words so that they may become a part of our working vocabularies.

Required Work:
* Ten to fifteen business documents
* Portfolio of all your finished assignments
* Participation in workshop discussions
* Mandatory attendance

Texts:
* The Business Writer's Companion ; Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, Walter E. Oliu
* The American Heritage College Dictionary, 3rd Edition, hard cover
* Student assignments

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002, 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Contrary to the what is printed in the Time Schedule Section 002 is not a meet together with Section 006.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joseph Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are the powers and limits of stories? To what extent is any text a critical response to the culture that shapes or produces it? How does a specifically literary text raise questions about the reigning fixations and assumptions that every culture possesses: its favorite ideas and subversive ideas, its prejudices, iconic images, and ideological markers? In addressing these questions, our discussions will focus on textual strategies and cultural representations: how plot structures make patterns of repetition with variation, and how characterization, diction, narrative perspectives, and other devices produce their effects in stories, novels, poems, and plays.

The readings, then, will engage questions and stimulate discussion about literature's relationships to cultural expression and ideas of gender, sexuality, nationality, and race as they arise in selected texts of English, Canadian, and American writing.

Course requirements consist of careful and thorough reading of all assigned texts, active participation in discussions, a series of short response papers, and three longer 5-7-page essays. Texts will include: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Atwood, Cat's Eye; Addonizio, Tell Me; Lasser, All I Could Get; and selections from an anthology, Making Literature Matter.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Louis Cicciarelli (lcicciar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section will first focus on short fiction and its key elements narration, place, characterization, structure, and theme to prepare students to engage literature. As we move from short stories to novels, a collection of poetry, and films, we'll develop sophisticated critical skills to better read and understand the texts we confront now and in the future. There will be several required papers, weekly writing assignments, and an emphasis on class discussion. Texts will likely include the story anthology You've Got To Read This, Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, Lydia Minatoya's The Strangeness of Beauty, Larry Woiwode's Beyond the Bedroom Wall, Evan Connell's Mrs. Bridge, Kevin Canty's Into the Great Wide Open, and James Wright's The Branch Will Not Break.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 – Examining the Body of Literature.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The generic title of this course, "What is literature?," poses an intriguing question, one that has no simple or definitive answer. Nevertheless, we will discuss it and try to discern what literature is and, perhaps, more importantly, what literature does and how it does it. Can we define it? Or do we just "know it when we see it"? Does it entertain? Does it instruct? And, if it instructs, just what kind of information does it convey? Aesthetic? Cultural? Social? Psychological? Historical? Like good detectives, we will be examining some small portion of the body of literature and drawing some theoretical conclusions about literature itself.

The course will focus on written texts, primarily novels and short stories. However, we will also be looking at a few films. These types of narratives have evolved over time to reflect numerous changes in men's and women's ways of thinking about themselves and the world as well as changes in ways of telling stories. This course is designed to trace those changes. Our readings will include classic works by William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Feodor Dostoevsky and works by the more modern and contemporary authors, William Faulkner and Charles Baxter. Requirements include: weekly reading responses, two short papers, and a final exam, as well as enthusiastic and frequent participation in class discussion.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore various concepts of "family" in recent fiction. As we read Toni Morrison's Sula, Ron Hansen's Atticus, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, and Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood, we will look at how notions of "family" are affected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. Although the emphasis will be on close readings, we will also study how other "literary" texts affect our interpretations. (For example, while reading Atticus we will read and discuss Conrad's The Secret Sharer, William's The Night of the Iguana, a Hopkins poem, Biblical parables, and Mayan creation myths.) There will be three in-class exams and several short response papers. Class participation is essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore various concepts of "family" in recent fiction. As we read Toni Morrison's Sula, Ron Hansen's Atticus, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, and Michael Cunninghams' Flesh and Blood, we will look at how notions of "family" are affected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. Although the emphasis will be on close readings, we will also study how other "literary" texts affect our interpretations. (For example, while reading Atticus we will read and discuss Conrad's The Secret Sharer, William's The Night of the Iguana, a Hopkins poem, Biblical parables, and Mayan creation myths.) There will be three in-class exams and several short response papers. Class participation is essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to give you exposure to a range of interpretive methods as we read a number of literary forms taken from three distinct periods in English, Atlantic, and U.S. literature. For example, as we read William Shakespeare's The Tempest, we will look at how modern critics and artists have analyzed the play in terms of: historical context, race and colonial or post-colonial theory, ecology, gender, and the history of ideas; we will think about acting and directing as forms of interpretation, and we will act out some of the scenes ourselves. Other texts will be Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative, a late eighteenth-century Atlantic slave autobiography, and William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, a modernist novel with four separate narrators set in the early twentieth-century U.S. south. We will therefore encounter a long historical sweep, and three different forms: the play, the autobiography, and the novel. You will bring in reading questions to every class and write an analytical paper on each text.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At the heart of this section of English 239 is the title question: What is literature? We will address this question by asking why people tell, listen to, and go to see (i.e., film/drama) stories? What is so compelling about stories that it seems part of our human nature to tell them? After considering these questions, the course will offer a brief review of the elements of prose fiction - plot, character and conflict, setting and point of view, symbolism, and irony. Equipped with these elements of the art of fiction, we will begin a close reading of texts that themselves suggest differing periods in the development of fiction (from romanticism to realism to post-modernism). We will also be reading essays that will expose us to various interpretive schools - feminist, psychoanalytic, deconstructive, and new historicist. Throughout this reading, we will be considering John Gardner's The Art of Fiction and asking what is the craft of literature to those who write it? Obviously, the course is covering a lot of literary terrain; in traveling through this landscape, we will always be guided by the fundamental questions: what is literature and why does it matter?

Requirements: reading quizzes 20%, class discussion 20%, response papers20%, analysis paper20%, and final exam20%.

Texts:
Ball, American Beauty (Newmarket 1-55704-404-x);
O'Brien, The Things They Carried (Broadway 0-7679-0289-0);
Hwang, M Butterfly (0-452-27259-9);
Hawthorne, Selected Storied of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Fawcett 0-449-30012-9);
Hemingway, In Our Time (Scribner 0-684-82276-8);
Wharton, The House of Mirth (Bantam 0-553-21320-2);
Morrison, Beloved (Penguin 0-14-028340-4);
Baxter, Feast of Love (Vintage/Random House 0-375-70910x);
Atwood, Negotiating with the Dead (Cambridge 0-521-66260-5).

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Ilana Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine the personal stories of survival that slave narratives and Holocaust narratives tell. We will consider how these texts address the power of writing to stem suffering and reconstitute a broken or forgotten self; the problem of representing what can never be adequately represented; and the possibility or impossibility for narrative to forge links between writers and readers. We will look at some fictions of Holocaust and slave experience in order to analyze the claims made by imaginative representations of historical experience. Finally, we will consider the way that all literary works, autobiographical or fictional, organize human experience into structures of meaning. Texts may include: Harriet Jacobs' Narrative in the Life of a Slave Girl, Toni Morrison's Beloved, Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz, Elie Wiesel's Night, and Cynthia Ozick's The Shawl.

Course requirements: regular attendance and participation, three 5-7 page papers, and short assignments.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Sarita See

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

War is a powerful idea in U.S. identity and culture. In particular, the idea of rebellion and revolution fundamentally shapes the U.S.'s perception of itself as a liberating and liberated nation. The Revolutionary War and the Civil War, for example, stand out as overmemorialized monuments to American freedom, albeit different and conflicting types of freedom. On the other hand, U.S. imperialist "adventures" in, for example, the Americas, the Pacific, and Asia effectively drop out of the national consciousness. Thus, the opportunity to counter the dominant narrative of liberation often is nullified; indeed, a racialized and invidious rhetoric of liberation - "benevolent assimilation" policies in the Philippines, for example - often masks the imperialist project. Thus, war is an integral part of the dominant fiction of U.S. national, racial, and imperial identity. Moreover, the question of how and whether wars are represented – in a novel, on television, in a movie, in the newspaper – profoundly shapes and delimits the way we read. Yet the ability to read, write, and think about literature also gives us ways to reframe, reinterpret, and perhaps rewrite the narratives of war.

Related topics we may consider include tensions between the disciplines of history and literature, the encounter between fiction and non-fiction, memory and forgetting, nation and gender, trauma, and the representation of war in contemporary popular culture. Readings will include works by William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Le Ly Hayslip, and selected critical essays. In narrowing the number of literary texts to be analyzed, we will devote some time to considering and distinguishing amongst multiple approaches to the text at hand, especially those influenced by feminism, psychoanalysis, critical race theory, postcolonial theory, narrative theory, historical studies, and autobiography studies.

Course requirements: informed participation, several short responses, two essays, and one final exam.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010 – The Literary Specimen

Instructor(s): Mark Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/239/010.nsf

To determine what literature is, we will begin by learning how to identify literature when it is thriving in its natural habitat as well as when it has been slain, stuffed, and mounted on the wall. Of particular importance will be a consideration of what literature is expected to do when it is either at work or at play. We will look - or rather glance - at the history of the critical commentary on the definition and purpose of literature. Among these critical texts will be fragments by Plato, Aristotle, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, Marx, Freud, Woolf, Barthes, and others. A much greater scrutiny will be given to a number of literary specimens, primarily narrative texts, including such works as Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's Hamlet and Macbeth, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe , Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Melville's Moby Dick, DeLillo's White Noise, as well as shorter pieces by Flaubert, Bierce, Kafka, Lessing, and others. Course work will consist of three five-page papers, two reading examinations, class participation, regular attendance, and constant, dutiful reading.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011 – The Politics of Genre. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Viv Soni

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/239/011.nsf

What is literature? We will explore this question by asking ourselves: why do people choose to write literature? Why does anyone read literature? What do we understand ourselves to be doing when we decide to read or write literary works? What do we expect from the encounter with literature? To find answers to questions like these, I propose that we approach the questions from a historical perspective: for what reasons have people chosen to read or write literature in a particular culture? What is the function of literature at different times and in different places? Has literature always existed and has it always served the same purpose? In particular, we will read as wide a range of literary genres as possible, and some "non-literary" genres too, to help us discern what counts as literature and what doesn't. Does the category "literature" include comic books, philosophical dialogues or history writing? Why or why not? What about the bible? The choice to write in a particular genre – the epic, the novel, the fable, satire, drama, essay, etc. – shapes the meanings of words in advance, gives them a particular social significance, forces us into particular habits of reading and appreciation. We will discover that literature is as much a social institution as a way of writing. As we survey a broad array of genres, and the radically divergent social functions of these genres, we will constantly try to discover what, if anything, links them together as "literature."

Readings will include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • Homer, Iliad (Selections)
  • Sophocles, Antigone
  • Aesop, Fables
  • Plato, Republic (Books 1-3)
  • Creation stories from Ovid and Bible
  • Livy, Early History of Rome
  • Cervantes, Don Quixote Part I
  • More, Utopia
  • Swift, Gulliver's Travels
  • Addison and Steele, Selection of periodical essays
  • Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience
  • Fairy tales by Andersen or Grimm
  • Short stories by Kafka or Borges
  • Contemporary comic book
  • Gibson, Neuromancer

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ted Chamberlin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce a wide range of poetry, from various periods and cultural traditions, to familiarize students with aspects of poetic technique and build interpretive skills. The relationships between spoken and written language, and between poetry, painting, and music, will form part of the discussion. Assignments will include two short papers, a longer term paper, and an oral presentation.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the techniques of verse – how poems are put together and how they work. We will consider a wide range of texts from the Renaissance to the present day, with an emphasis on shorter lyric poetry. Requirements include full class participation, several written exercises, an oral project based on the study of a major poet, and a final exam. Readings will be from The Norton Introduction to Poetry (7th edition), Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook, and Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introduction to lyric poetry will draw its reading from a wide historical range, from the earliest poetry in English to the present. Its aim is to teach you how to read poetry with understanding and delight; to this end, we will attend closely to the techniques and resources of language that poets use to articulate their visions of experience. We will consider especially matters of form (including diction, prosody, tone, and figurative language) and the way they shape themes, voice, intertextual connections, and poetic traditions. Classes will proceed mainly by intensive discussion of a few poems each day. Assignments to include short exercises, some memorizing, three or four short papers, and a final.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim here is to enhance our enjoyment of poetry. How poetry uses language uniquely, how rhythm, rhyme, and meter give pleasure and highlight meaning – these are some of the subjects we will study, along with metaphor and other kinds of figurative language. We will also examine how a poem means one thing by saying something different (irony). Most Wednesdays a short quiz will be given on details of what we have been studying. These quizzes and other brief assignments will count for 25% of your total grade. You will also be assigned the occasional two-page paper and one five-pager.

Textbooks: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Shorter Edition. Seamus Heaney & Ted Hughes, The Rattlebag.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Too often poetry is seen as a literary form that only dedicated writers, academics, and their victims (students) read. I hope that the experience of reading and discussing poems in this course will encourage you to read poetry outside the classroom. The course will provide you with extensive practice in close reading that should challenge and develop your interpretive abilities. We will focus throughout the term on the designs of poetry - its formal aspects and its purpose: the means by which each poem makes its claims on a reader's attention. Discussions will repeatedly raise questions about the act of reading, of interpretation itself. How does a community of readers arrive at a consensus on the meaning of a poem? We will be working from The Norton Anthology of Poetry and a course pack. Assignments will include frequent oral reports and numerous short papers (2-3 pp.), and a final essay (10 pp.) on a poet of your choice. Participation in discussions is required; attendance is mandatory.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (sabbas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will learn to read (and enjoy) poetry. The pleasures of poetry are considerable, but they are pleasures that are enhanced by careful attention to the details of poetic texts. We will focus on how poems generate their meanings, how sound affects sense, and the ways in which the form of a poem tells us how to read it. The emphasis of the course will be on learning to close-read poems of varying (mostly short) lengths. Readings will be from the Renaissance to the present. Several short assignments, 2 (4-5 page) papers, and an oral report. Students will be required to participate in class discussion; attendance is mandatory.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010 – Petals on a Wet Black Bough.

Instructor(s): Lyall H Powers (lhpowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Poetry at its best is a mode of human communication, both vocal and scriptural, the aim of which is not the imparting of information per se – like "Directions" on a soup can or "Instructions" for an erector set – but rather intellectual and emotional engagement with some important human concern like love, folly, death, fun, etc. We will begin by looking at kinds of poems and how they work – like learning the rules and techniques of basketball or chess or dancing (and other pleasurable activities); then we will look at the range of treatment given those "human concerns" in poems written over the centuries. We will consider particularly how poems communicate what they want to engage us in and entertain us with. We will discuss these matters in class, write about them in a few short exercises (2 pp. each) and a couple of little essays (5 pp. each), and commit some good poetic example (say 50 lines) to memory. The course has little practical use: it just helps you understand human creatures (including yourself) and how they interact with each other – merely educational.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter ed.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course discusses and analyzes numerous samples of poetry through history and through its present practitioners. We will ask: What makes a poem, and how do we know this? Can / should poems tell stories? Is poetry oral or written? What is its relationship to song? Who is poetry for? How are expectations of poetry shaped by specific literary periods, political movements, and our own identities in terms of gender, ethnicity, and class? In addition to reading poems selected from an anthology, we will look in detail at the works of at least two contemporary poets. If possible, these will be the same poets that we hear when, as the beneficiaries of our extraordinarily lively writing community, we attend two poetry readings held outside of class. Course evaluation will be based on oral contributions (class discussion and an oral presentation), as well as the assigned writings, which include one-page responses to the poetry readings; several short (1-2 page) analyses of specific poems, and one longer (4-5 page) paper that compares several poems in terms of theme, form, and/or imagery. To sharpen our poetry-reading skills, we will also occasionally do some (non-graded) poetry-writing exercises in class.

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ENGLISH 245 / RCHUMS 280 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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ENGLISH 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will concentrate on the movement and development of Shakespearean tragedy by studying "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so we will also consider the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm, a final, and a series of short written assignments.

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ENGLISH 274 / CAAS 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 – African American Literature in the U.S., from 1773 to 1912

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will study the emergence and early development of African American literature in the U.S. from 1773 to 1912. Through close readings of a wide variety of African American texts and genres, we will explore the constraints and opportunities that governed the writing of these texts. We will ask: how did these novels, autobiographies, and poetry speak to the different experiences and concerns of African Americans in the United States? How did they help blacks gain a national voice in a slaveholding and racially polarized nation? Writers include Frederick Douglass, Williams Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, and Charles Chestnutt. Assignments will include short response papers and midterm and final exams.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rwbailey/English_305.html

Though a requirement for students seeking certification as secondary school English teachers, English 305 appeals to a broader audience interested in the structure of English and its varieties. Topics to be discussed include: gender-based differences in American English and regional and social dialects in the United States, including African-American English, Appalachian English, Hispanic English, and Native American English; and English as a rule-governed language, shaped by its history, and the history of ideas about good (and "bad" English). English 305 is designed for native-speakers of English (with no prior study of the language or of linguistics) who are curious about the language community of which they are a part. A midterm and final examination allow students to demonstrate the ability to make well-founded generalizations based on the material studied. Short papers invite explorations of domains of language.

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ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Cuzan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers the opportunity to explore the dramatic ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years – dramatic enough that we as Modern English speakers can barely understand those who first began to call their language "English" (and wrote texts such as Beowulf). In the broadest terms, this course will explore how English developed from a little-known west Germanic dialect spoken on an island off the coast of western Europe into a distinct, international language spoken as a native tongue by almost 400 million people. To this end, we will also consider a variety of more specific questions such as: Where did the pronoun she come from? (And why is it the Word of the Millennium?) When was double negation considered standard? How did English spelling become, according to Mario Pei, the "world's most awesome mess"? Why and how do "living" languages change?

This course will examine the traditional stages in the "life" of English: Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English. We will focus on the general sound, word, and grammar changes within the language, as well as related literary, cultural, and historical events. In the process, as we learn more about the language's past, we will think about the meaning and implications of the language's present and future. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, a short paper, a midterm, and a final. The critical prerequisite for the course is genuine curiosity about the details of language and how language changes.

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ENGLISH 310. Discourse and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 124 or 125. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

English 310 teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school faculty and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford, Cooley, and Southeastern High Schools in Detroit, and at the Adrian and Maxey Training Schools, Boysville, and Vista Maria, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, writings, art, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and teach each other hands-on methods. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 – Fantasy.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313Ff02syl.html

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E. T. A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; Like Water for Chocolate; Laura Esquivel, and Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 010 – The Beat Generation. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix."

That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by the work being done by Action Painters and jazz musicians from the Bebop school. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, read poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch,etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings by Jackson Pollock. The course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Expect brief weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final, plus a three-page and a ten-page paper. A half-dozen films will be shown in the evenings after class. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to English majors.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 – Women and Space. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the relationship between women and space in twentieth century writings by women as a way of addressing questions of geography and identity. As women experience greater mobility, how do they represent their voluntary migrations? How do interiors continue to locate female experience? How do dislocations, the result of immigration or travel, result in the relocation of female identities within written narratives? How are spatial metaphors used to describe the place of the woman writer in culture and how do differences among women effect the way in which women write? Primary texts include Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Dinesen's Out of Africa, Cather's The Professor's House, Cisneros' The House on Mango Street, Yamada's Camp Notes, Brookner's Hotel du Lac, Kincaid's A Small Place, and Ehrlich's The Solace of Open Spaces. Assignments include one short paper and a final, and either two take-home midterms or a paper and its revision.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 – Women, Authorship, and National Identity.

Instructor(s): Maria Sanchez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Culture clashes, sentimental sap, trash, schlock, genteel and rank amateurism, high art, Pulitzers and Nobels, tearjerkers, Lollapalooza road poetry, and salvation: this course will cover a range of writings by or about American women from the early 19th century to the present day. We will consider carefully the historical and cultural contexts of our chosen readings, and examine responses to the following questions: What is the relationship of literature to conceptions of national identity, promise, or destiny? What constitutes "good" and "bad" writing at given moments in US history, and what is the relationship of gender to such aesthetic judgments? How have American writers understood connections between women and authorship? Requirements include a combination of short papers and a term research project. Authors may include Michelle Serros, Zitkala-Sa, Toni Morrison, Willa Cather, Sarah Orne Jewett, Harriet Jacobs, and Catharine Sedgwick.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 – Discovering the Land of Oz: An American Narrative. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

If there is one element embedded forever in the American temperament, it is the need – the essential need – to determine one's own destiny. Perhaps that is why, for example, the story of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has been told and retold in different forms by American authors since 1939, at least. This course wants primarily to study what goes into establishing a contemporary American identity. It is pretty exciting to have new, creative texts written by different ethnic groups, different sexual orientations, different genders, different religions – all describing their particular America. It is the multitude of difference that produces what we think of as our personal America. So many Americas. Yet with all the differences, contemporary American literature shares a pride, often a disappointment, but always a will to make it better. In this course we will spend the term exploring the conflicting tensions inherent to those ideas.

Selections from texts primarily - not completely – will be chosen from the following: Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies; Michael Cunningham's A Home at the End of the World; Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye; Louise Erdrich's The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse; Michael Chabon's The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay; Anthony Giardina's Recent History; Eric Liu's The Accidental Asian, Audre Lorde's Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Myla Goldberg's The Bee Season; Gloria Naylor's The Men of Brewster Place; and Deborah Eisenberg's All Around Atlantis. BUT, of course, we will start off the term watching the film The Wizard of Oz. There will be a weekly written response and comprehensive midterm and final exams.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 – Literature of the American Wilderness. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with ENVRNSTD 407.001.

Instructor(s): John R Knott (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness and wildness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to contemporary responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods (selections), Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, and Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, and Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 – Yiddish Classics. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is modern Yiddish culture? What are its origins and how did it develop? Who were its major writers and what were the themes, social structures, literary forms of primary concern to them? In this course we will answer these and other questions by reading the fiction of three writers: Sh.Y. Abramovitch (also known as Mendele Moykher Sforim), Sholem Aleichem, and Y.L. Peretz. Their short stories and novels are considered the classics of modern Yiddish literature and offer a provocative introduction into the Eastern European Jewish milieu in which they wrote. We will also consider some of the adaptations made of their work in Yiddish and English drama and film, and some of the changes made when their stories and novels were brought to an American audience.

Requirements for the course include weekly reading assignments, active classroom participation, three short essays and a final. All works will be read in English translation; no knowledge of Yiddish is required.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 – What is Truth? Representing Pontius Pilate.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Pontius Pilate makes a brief appearance in the Christian gospels, and the shape of that appearance varies from account to account. From a brisk, if vacillating and weak Roman procurator in Mark, through Matthew and Luke, he becomes in John something of a philosopher, though perhaps a jaded one, his curiosity temporarily piqued by this strange figure before him. Out maneuvered by Jesus' enemies, Pilate at last consents to Jesus' execution, and in the epigraph he writes for Jesus, becomes the first Gentile to acknowledge what will be the Christian understanding of Jesus' identity.

The stream of literary and visual works - commentary, sermons, plays, poems, novellae, films, paintings - which over the centuries have represented and interpreted Pontius Pilate is vast. In this course we will study a sampling of these works from the earliest mention of Pilate to the present day. We will begin with Ann Wroe's recent and much-acclaimed book Pontius Pilate, and simultaneously discuss the other works we select.

This course is being offered in connection with a residency by the great British director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Michael Boyd. Students in this course will have the option of applying to work with Michael Boyd (who is planning while here to work with students on a stage script and a film script of based on Ann Wroe's book); they would do so intensively over the month of October, and would be released from this course to do so. The students would then re-engage with this course (others not working with Boyd will continue through the term) and finish a project pertinent both to this course and to their work with Michael Boyd.

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ENGLISH 318. Literary Types.

Section 001 – Restoration and 18th Century Drama. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After the restoration of Charles II to the throne in 1660, theatres reopen with renewed vitality. Women are now included on the public stage, and brilliant new plays explore themes of gender and society. Throughout the eighteenth century, London theatres continue to thrive, reflecting changing social attitudes and political concerns. We will examine these attitudes, the role of women, the rise of the star system, and the significance of the actor-manager and power of the box office. We will also look at changes in stagecraft and scenic conventions. Representative dramatists include Behn, Congreve, Dryden, Etherege, Tate, Wycherley, Addison, Fielding, Gay, Goldsmith, Lillo, Sheridan, and Steele.

Requirements: several in-class writing exercises, a research project, a midterm and final exam. Textbooks: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Comedy (Norton Critical Edition); "The Beggar's Opera" and Other Eighteenth-Century Plays (Everyman); and a coursepack.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 – Life-Stories.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As a course that engages students in the process of collecting and writing life-stories, including their own, this course is tied to the Liz Lerman "Hallelujah Project" and current residency; Lerman is a nationally known choreographer who specializes in community dance. Lerman's work (and this course) is based on the premise that community-shared art can change lives. As part of the Lerman project, students in this course will make several visits to a designated Detroit site – such as an elderly home, an after-school program, or a community center – in order to do oral histories and help facilitate writing workshops with Detroit city residents. Students will also have the opportunity to observe and dance with Lerman and her troupe in that same Detroit setting; then the students will help document, through writing, the Lerman experience. In the classroom itself, students will begin to write their own life-stories, as they read and comment on the autobiographically-based work of such writers as Maya Angelou, Sandra Cisneros, N. Scott Momaday, and Mary Karr. We will focus on how differences in race, ethnicity, gender, and physical ability inform life-stories. We will address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? What do they choose to remember and to tell? What is left out of their stories, and why? How do communal and individual stories differ, and what do they share? No prior dance experience is needed for this course (indeed, many of our Detroit partners have none, and your instructor has very little). Students will be assessed on the quality of their participation (both in and out of class) and especially, on their written contributions. The writing will include a number of smaller (1-page) responses that form the basis for the student's individual, larger (approximately 8-page) life-story, as well as a communal, documentary work (such as an exhibit, film, or performance), that will involve our Detroit partners and Lerman's troupe as well.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 – Rhetorical Activism & U.S. Civil Rights Movements. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL319f02/index.html

The signers of the United States Constitution recognized the power of rhetorical activism when they declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women spent eight decades using the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. The persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed this nation's consciousness as well as the experience of civil rights for all of its citizens. And although the United States did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, people like Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan forever altered the expectations and opportunities for women and men. How did these ordinary people accomplish extraordinary things by speaking up and speaking out? More broadly, how do people use language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from several U.S. civil rights movements: the early woman's rights, antislavery, women's liberation, 1960s civil rights, and gay rights movements. Work for this course includes weekly readings (hard copy and online), exams, and quizzes.

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ENGLISH 321. Internship.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in English. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a total of four credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 – Poetry.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor (keitay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a poetry writing workshop intended for student writers with some experience in the art. The hope is that these writers will produce new work and participate in the critical discussion of their own work and that of their colleagues. Members of the class will submit new poems every week for evaluation. A few formal and thematic assignments will be given as needed to help focus some of the writing.

Although the on-going process of writing poems is the central focus of the course, a fair amount of reading and some critical writing will also be required. Final evaluations will be based on 25-30 pages of poetry that has gone through some level of revision, 3 short papers about poetry readings, one classroom presentation on a living poet, and two short classroom presentations on different poetic forms or devices.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 3rd. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to: (1) Get on the Waitlist. (2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 3. (3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to: (1) Get on the Waitlist. (2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 3. (3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

English 323 is an intermediate level course in the writing (and reading) of short fiction. The primary focus of the course will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published stories. Students will be required to write two complete stories (2500-5000 words) for the workshop, and revise both by the end of the term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and occasional short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will usually consist of three to four stories each week.

Required text: Coursepack

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 3. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 – The Mask.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil," a parable in which a good parson comes out of his house one morning wearing a veil over his face, the Townspeople respond by whispering to each other: "He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his face." The center of our discussions in this writing class will be to address the questions of created personas, of inspired identities. The characters we read about will help us understand lives we haven't lived, whereas our own writing, perhaps, will be inspired by the lives we have lived or want to live, by the "stories" we want to tell. Each individual community we belong to (for example: friend, student, child, sibling, religious preference [or non-preference], sexual partner) encourages us to play a different role. So many communities. So many roles. Our readings will have us, in small ways, experience the lives of different ethnic groups, genders, and sexual orientations. Our writing will need to use this experience of the other as we attempt to create a rhetorical "I" to narrate our own essays. Reading contemporary literature, discussion, writing, and more writing will be the mainstay of the class. Assignments include: approximately three ten page essays and a weekly peer response from each student. The readings will be selected from a diverse group of authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 – Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we carve our lives out of past lives - our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what "to forget"? We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "what actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts we read and the films we view. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, dynamic world out of combining past experience with imagination? Our own memories may become as haunting as T.S. Eliot's provocation: "I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling." It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it. Whether we are listening as John Irving has his characters reveal their stories in their own voice, as Margaret Atwood has us watch and listen to the happenings in the text as being told by an unknown narrator, as Gloria Naylor has us listen to many different narrators tell us one related story, or as a fellow student creates a rhetorical "I" to argue through his or her narrative voice, we will attend to the way in which writing becomes powerful and intellectual. Ultimately, we will write at least three completed essays and respond to each fellow students work throughout the term.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course that

  1. gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers),
  2. allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing,
  3. offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and
  4. keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term.

Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005, 006.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 – The Art of the Not-So-Serious Essay

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In academic life the conventional essay is often written and read as a serious attempt to enlighten or persuade the audience through the organized use of evidence and logic. But in this course we will study and write essays that balk convention in a variety of ways, often – though not necessarily – with comic aims and results. First we will consider the phenomenon of Gonzo Journalism, in which authors like Hunter S. Thompson and David Foster Wallace defy the usual reporters' rules of economy, objectivity, and truth; instead, they create energetic stories of excess, personal involvement, and imagination. Second, we'll consider Outrageous Proposals, such as Jonathon Swift's "A Modest Proposal" or Thomas Lynch's "Golfatorium." In these kinds of essays authors manipulate the usual argumentative proposal, highlighting society's problems by making a rigorous case for an absurd solution. Finally, we'll take up False Documents and "Fictional Non-fiction." These pieces masquerade as non-fiction while in fact bearing little relation to the author's real experience. Such essays challenge our understanding of what essays are supposed to do or be; they seem to fall somewhere in between story and essay. Our aims, through all of this, will be to discover more imaginative and humorous applications of the essay and to study the ways in which voice, rhythm, tone, style, detail, and structure create comic effect.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore contemporary American essays with particular focus on personal essay and memoir. We will consider the role of memory in our individual and collective histories and the political consequences of selective "amnesia." We will discuss how writing the specific can transcend the personal and communicate the essence of the human story. In addition to a course pack, we will read two collections: The Best American Essays 2001; Kathleen Norris, editor and The Business of Memory: The Art of Remembering in an Age of Forgetting; Charles Baxter, editor. Six informal writing exercises and four papers resulting in forty pages of formal writing is required.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Hilary Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our goal is to help each other produce masterful, eloquent, and lively prose. Although we will review briefly the major types of stands (or stases) writers can take, analyze sample essays, and discuss famous figures of language rhetorical experts recommend, you need not write only according to set models. We will use in-class writing and peer reviewing as we share and sharpen ideas. Topics for essays will be open. Consistent effort and engaged participation will be key.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Francesca Delbanco (cescadel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/325/011.nsf

This course will furnish students with the tools, guidance, and freedom to write with increased confidence and strength. In-class writing exercises, as well as more structured assignments and individual attention will enable students to take greater risks on thematic, technical, and personal levels. Topics will be of the students' own choosing. Readings of established writers in traditional essay, humor, and creative non-fiction will provide a range of models in style and subject from which students may borrow and experiment. Swapping ideas and techniques is encouraged; in-class discussions and workshopping will be safe yet challenging.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"If we had to say what writing is, we would define it essentially as an act of courage." --Cynthia Ozick.

"Music is your own experience; if you don't live it, it won't come out your horn." -- Charlie Parker

In this seminar, you will work to bring to the page what no other artist has: your own way of phrasing, your own way of observing, your own history that shapes your lens. What do you remember most vividly? What do you most vividly forget? Where does the line blur between fact and fiction, and how can you walk this line as a tightrope to find deeper truth? As writers, you will be asked to use writing as a shovel, excavating meaning in your life. This class will function as a workshop and is designed to give you the structure and tools you need to realize your own intentions. We will read as writers; essays are our only texts, including works by Joyce Carol Oates, Henry Louis Gates, Judith Ortiz Coffer, John Updike, and many others. While you will learn from critical feedback and lessons on craft, it is my hope that when you sit in front of the blank page you will write what moves you, and yours will be the only voice you hear. Ultimately, if your writing is working, it will be meaningful not only to yourself but to your readers is well, and this is where craft and revision play a crucial role. Because workshops are based on the responsibility we have to each other as writers, punctuality, attendance and participation are essential to your success in this class in which you will write four essays, exploring different forms of personal narrative.

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ENGLISH 327 / THTREMUS 327. Intermediate Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles F Gordon

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 227. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 331(413) / FILMVID 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 – Horror Films.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 331.001.

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ENGLISH 349(449) / THTREMUS 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

See Theatre and Drama 323.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 349(449) / THTREMUS 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 002 – This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 323.002.

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ENGLISH 350 / MEMS 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 – New Literary Histories. This course is the first of a two-term sequence designed to study the historical development of literature in English. This course satisfies either the Pre-1600 or Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/350/001.nsf

Once upon a time, pre-1600 literary history was a nationalist story about the development of great art; it was a tale of masculine achievements stretching from Beowulf to Shakespeare. That story has come to seem inadequate, for it does not address a number of fundamental questions about literary culture:

  • What literature was excluded from the canon and why?
  • What did women write?
  • Did they invent their own literary traditions?
  • Who was the literate majority and how did they define minorities?

In this course, students will read texts that allow for diverse answers to such questions, including Beowulf, Old English riddles, Marie de France's lais, selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, early drama, Spenser's Fairie Queene, the poetry and prose of Queen Elizabeth I, and Marlowe's Faustus. We will also read several versions of literary history, including conventional political histories as well as recent work in women's history. Our goal will be to understand how literary histories are invented – and how we can reinvent them.

Course requirements include quizzes and exams, informal in-class writing, formal essays, and some collaborative peer work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 – This course satisfies either the Pre-1600 or Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The family – its formation, tenderness, strains, collapse, and reformation – is perhaps Shakespeare's favorite form, social and symbolic, for the construction of meaning and evocation of feeling. We will especially observe his ceaseless exploration of the dynamics of the family in our reading of a selection of history plays, comedies, tragedies, and romances, from the whole span of his career. Other foci for discussion will include his dramaturgy, and his matchless way with words. Plays to be read will include: Richard II, I&II Henry IV, Henry V, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Othello, King Lear, Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, Pericles, A Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. I hope to offer, as an optional series, four lectures outside the regular class sessions, on Shakespeare's first history tetralogy, 1, 2, 3 Henry VI, and Richard III. Course requirements will include lively engagement in discussion, two essays (5-7 pages each), and two examinations.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 – Things Unattempted Yet in Prose or Rhyme. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will engage with literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost. Our major theme for 2002 will be the way in which even the first of these represents a reworking of powerful earlier traditions – and then is available to new works which contest its authority. We will study "tradition," in short, and the ways by which "the Last" becomes "the Next."

We shall read some of the most dazzlingly interesting and beautifully constructed works in any language at any time. We will start with Beowulf, > and continue with works by (among others) Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. The course will involve much discussion, some group projects, and (for those who wish to do so) a special hour set aside each week to discuss Shakespeare's Sonnets in the context of the European and English sonnet tradition.

There will be two essays required, each of 6-8 pages, oral reports, and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 – Troy and the Story of Troilus in Medieval and Early Modern Literature. (Honors). This course satisfies either the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare both wrote versions of the story of the failed love between Troilus and his unfaithful lover Criseyde, a romance set against the immanent fall of Troy to the Greek army. Focusing on Chaucer's long narrative poem and Shakespeare's play, this course explores the questions raised by early modern England's most tragic romance: what is the relationship between private emotions and public events? To what extent is identity defined by love and desire and to what extent is it defined by the impersonal forces of history? We'll broaden our comparison with another medieval romance (probably Sir Gawain and the Green Knight) and another Shakespeare play (probably Antony and Cleopatra), so that we can use the Troilus story to ask questions about literary history: what marks the boundary between medieval and Renaissance culture? What formal and thematic concerns did they have in common? What assumptions did they share about their relationship to the classical past?

We will read Chaucer's poetry in Middle English: no prior experience is necessary, but a willingness to grapple with Chaucer in his own language is. Other requirements: three short papers; an oral presentation or performance; and an exam.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (sabbas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do English writers of the seventeenth century grapple with religious controversy, the challenges and failures of science, and the pressure of an intellectual, theological and social world in ferment? How do different literary genres give shape to these questions? What is the intersection between literary form and religious, political, and philosophical debate? What is the relation between sex and religion for writers of this period? How does the idea of Englishness work its way into concerns about form? We will ask these, and other, questions throughout the term. Possible readings from Francis Bacon, John Donne, Fulke-Greville, Ben Jonson, Michael Drayton, Aemilya Lanyer, Mary Wroth, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, John Milton, Thomas Kyd, Richard Crashaw, Thomas Carew, and others. Two papers (one long, one short) and a final.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 – This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with a key term from the history of ideas, a term with special relevance to the study of the arts in the modern periods ("modern" meaning early 19th century through the present). That term is "Enlightenment," a body of ideas associated with reason, nature, the scientific method, secularism, liberalism, skepticism, and many other movements and values still dominant in the cultures of the west. If there is one synonym for Enlightenment, that might be "critique"; appropriately, our study of Enlightenment includes the many critiques of it that emerged from its founding period and those that followed. Thus, we will read not only selections from Bacon, Locke, Descartes, Paine, Kant (and other philosophers) but works by Coleridge, Wordsworth, Blake, Byron, and Shelley (poets of the Romantic period), as well as texts from the history of social thought that comment on the topic of knowledge and power (e.g., Schiller, Weber, Marx, Freud, Adorno, Foucault, Deleuze, Jameson).

Requirements: regular reporting on the reading, formal and informal; summaries of selected arguments; independent application of the ideas under discussion to texts and topics not treated in class; and two substantial essays.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 003 – Learning to Feel: Sentiment in the Eighteenth Century. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Viv Soni

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/371/003.nsf

How and when do feelings become important in understanding ourselves and our relation to others? When, and through what literary techniques, is a language developed for expressing the range of human emotions? How does this intense focus on emotions change us for better and worse? This course will provide a wide-ranging introduction to the literature of the eighteenth century, using "sentimentalism" – the eighteenth century discourse on feelings – as a lens to focus our discussions. Sentimentalism is crucial in shaping both the Romantic movement and the early development of the novel; the language of sentiment also infects a number of other fields, including ethics, politics, religion, and philosophy. We will examine the full range of writing about emotions in the eighteenth century, asking ourselves along the way: how is modern literature born out of this encounter with emotion? Why does emotion become so important at just this historical juncture in the eighteenth century? What are the ethical and political consequences of this focus on emotions? How do we understand ourselves differently as ethical and political agents when our emotions are given such priority? What is the relationship between reason (Enlightenment rationality) and feeling (sentiment)? How are the boundaries of public, private, and domestic configured around the expression of affect? What is the relationship between gender and the new discourse of feelings? Although the eighteenth century discourse on feelings is a much-neglected field of study, the language of sentiment continues to shape the way we understand ourselves, and the role of literature in our lives even today. This course will not only provide a historical introduction to the eighteenth century and its discourse of feeling, but will provide you with the tools for understanding the appeals to sentiment in contemporary culture, from advertisements to Hollywood films to contemporary moral theory.

Readings will include, but not be limited to, the following: Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy (selections); Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Richardson, Pamela; Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments (selections); Hume (selections); Burke on the Sublime and the Beautiful; Sterne, Sentimental Journey; MacKenzie, The Man of Feeling; Goldsmith, The Vicar of Wakefield; Wordsworth (selections); Austen, Sense and Sensibility.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Ilana Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the beginnings of the novel and its development as a form through the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Much of our attention will be devoted to the close reading of novels by authors including Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Scott, and Austen. We will be particularly interested in the emergence of the category of "fiction": many early novels represent themselves as true histories, with novelists posing as mere "chroniclers" or "editors" of original documents. What conditions–philosophical and material–contribute to these claims? How does this relationship between fictional and historical literature develop over time and how does it continue to shape our contemporary, twenty-first century understanding of fact and fiction? Readings on these topics will be assigned.

Requirements will include informed participation, regular short papers and assignments, two essays, and a take-home final.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 – Literature of Exile and Mobility.

Instructor(s): Josh Miller

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider U.S. literature with a particular emphasis on the themes of mobility and stasis. We will discuss novels that use and abuse binaries such as exile & expatriation, captivity & liberty, mobility & immobility, assimilation & exclusion, and patriot & traitor. Authors on the syllabus will include: Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Henry James, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Djuna Barnes, Américo Paredes, James Baldwin, John Okada, and Toni Morrison.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 – Locating Modernism.

Instructor(s): Andrea Zemgulys

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/372/002.nsf

Modernist literature often leaves us wondering just where in the world we are as readers; indeed, many modernist authors explicitly wished that we dispense with our desire for narratives grounded in stable and recognizable settings. At the same time, these authors were also fascinated with the relation between their art and the world, with how spaces represented in their imaginative work were (however tenuously) linked with actual places. This course will explore the empty, abstract, and/or dislocating spaces of modernist art, and think about their relation to some of modernism's most favored settings (such as urban streets, battlefields of the Great War, and peripheries of the empire). Do we understand these texts any better for examining their locations? Or do our efforts to locate modernism lead to a misreading of its texts? The reading list for this course will include works by Djuna Barnes, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, E.M. Forster, Wilfred Owen, Jean Rhys, Gertrude Stein, and Virginia Woolf.

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ENGLISH 381 / AMCULT 324. Asian American Literature.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to key texts of Asian Pacific American Literature. Our study of writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston, David Wong Louie, Toshio Mori, Bharati Mukherjee, Jessica Hagedorn, Carlos Bulosan, Milton Murayama, Lois-Ann Yamanaka, and Nora Okja Keller will be discussed in ways that reveal the complexity of the category Asian Pacific American, and the ways in which notions of Asian American identity typically grounded in questions of immigration, assimilation, and cultural nationalism are complicated by paradigms of colonization. This course examines the ways in which studying the literature of Asian Pacific America reveals the contradictions of both U.S. "exceptionalism" at home as well as abroad.

And, in this way, this course turns the study of Asian American literature to questions of U.S. empire, neocolonialism, and globalization. Requirements include midterm and final exams, one 3-5 page paper, one 7-8 page paper.

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ENGLISH 382 / AMCULT 328. Native American Literature.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read the Native American novels, non-fiction works, and films most commonly associated with the Native American literary renaissance and the popularization of contemporary pan-tribal culture. Produced over a thirty year period, 1968-98, these texts profoundly affected the ways in which Americans and Native Americans view indigenous cultures and peoples. The works of Vine Deloria, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silk, and others will guide our explorations into tribal sovereignty, spirituality, gender, and the creation of a popular pan-tribal literature. We will view films, such as Smoke Signals and Dance Me Outside, to assist our discussions on native self-representation in popular culture. Major course assignments will include three five page papers.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do Jewish writers in America straddle the divide between Jewish culture and modern American life? How do they interpret the collective past and create a collective memory? What features, if any, define the Jewish-American literary canon? What recurring metaphors, images, and characters animate this literature? To respond to these questions, this course explores a range of texts from the immigrant writings of Mary Antin to the post-Holocaust writings of Cynthia Ozick. Other authors include Morris Rosenfeld, Anna Margolin, Jacob Glatstein, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, and Isaac Bashevis Singer. While some of these authors wrote in Yiddish, all of their works will be read in translation. Two papers (4-6 pages), midterm, and final.

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ENGLISH 387 / AMCULT 327. Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.

Section 001 – Imagining Mexicanness.

Instructor(s): Maria Sanchez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course includes a variety of novels, memoirs, and poetry that seek to understand the essence, history, and limits of Mexican, Mexican American, and/or Chicano identity. Although we will read primarily 20th century authors, our chosen works will traverse 16th century Mexico, 19th century Texas, and 20th century Chicago and Los Angeles. The course will begin with two structuring questions: What relationships do our authors imagine between people/gente and nation/país? How do specific forms (autobiography, lyric, short story) facilitate questions of individual, communal, and national identities? A few of the works we read will contain untranslated Spanish, but this should not keep away anyone unfamiliar with the language; necessary translations will be done in class through the course of close readings. Requirements include a combination of short papers and a term research project. Authors may include Kathleen Alcalá, Graciela Limón, the Taco Shop Poets, Benjamin Saenz, John Phillip Santos, and Norma Elia Cantú.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 – Old English. This course satisfies either the Pre-1600 or Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators. Meets with English 501.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings – the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 – Prison Reality. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 – Technology and the Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf02/415f02syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 – Literary Stylistics.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey work on the language of literature in all of the major genres - song, poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Aspects of language will be taken up as they arise as a major focus of concern in the individual genres - for example, rhythm and sound in song; visuality, intonation, syntactic/rhetorical schemes, and imagery/symbolism in poetry; functional grammar, tropes, speech/thought presentation, and social/geographical dialects in prose fiction; and speech acts, conversational routines, and paralanguage in drama. General principles will be taken from textbook surveys of the language of song, poetry, drama, and prose fiction. Case studies of particular authors will be explored in a coursepack of readings. Requirements for the course will be four medium length papers (5-8 pages), one on the language of each of the genres.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 – Jewish Culture in America. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with the rise of the "New York intellectuals" and concluding with the Klezmer revival, this senior seminar traces the development of Jewish culture in America during the last half century. We will examine a wide range of cultural forms including literary works, essays, plays, films, stand-up comedy, and musical recordings. Among the themes to be discussed are the tensions between "high" and popular culture, American assimilation and its discontents, classical Jewish themes in modern forms, and the problem of representing the Holocaust. Among the figures we will consider are Alfred Kazin, Micky Katz, Grace Paley, Saul Bellow, Lenny Bruce, Philip Roth, Allen Ginsberg, Cynthia Ozick, Art Spiegelman, Irene Klepfitz, and Tony Kushner. Students will write a number of short response papers and one 8-12 page paper.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 – Medieval Romance: Gender and Genre.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate the construction of gender and sexuality in medieval romance. We will examine how romance idealizes women, how that idealization is central to the construction of masculine identity, and how the genre subverts - or supports - traditional representations of gender with outspoken or sexually assertive ladies and knights who are notably passive. Because a central concern of the course will be the way in which configurations of gender are related to questions of genre, we will look at how other medieval narrative traditions - both secular (fabliaux: that is, bawdy comic stories) and sacred (saints' lives) - complement or challenge romance representations of gender and sexuality. These comparisons open up questions of how we read medieval literature: what difference does it make to read romance in its historical context or from the perspective of modern understandings of gender? Are "historicist" and "feminist" approaches compatible or incompatible?

Many readings will be in Middle English: no prior experience is necessary but you should come prepared for the challenge of learning medieval English. Requirements include active participation, frequent short response papers; and a seminar paper.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 – Epic and Romance in the Middle Ages.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Epic usually depicts war and the public, political emergence of nations, while romance focuses on private experience, love, and self-building. But many medieval narratives intertwine love and war, private and public, individual and social to give imaginative shape to the aspirations and anxieties of the aristocracy (12th-15th centuries). We will attend particularly to ways in which literary works resolve, negotiate, or suppress conflicts of dearly-held values: does love foster reconciliation to one's social group, or is it profoundly antisocial? Can one temper the raw violence of knightly prowess with civilized courtly refinement? Readings include works by Chretien, Marie, Chaucer, and Malory, as well as a selection representing major stories (such as Tristan and Isolde), characters (such as Gawain, Lancelot, Guinevere, and Arthur), and varieties of epic and romance. Arthurian romance will be a major focus. Works in Middle English will be read in the original language. Writing requirements include frequent short responses and a substantial research paper.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 – Literature and the Law.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law, as an institution, and justice, as an ethical concept, as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 008 – Native American Literature.

Instructor(s): Ted Chamberlin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will begin with a consideration of the relationships between oral and written traditions and between native American and European languages (especially English), and it will address some of the ways in which written texts can variously embody, resist, and appropriate oral forms. We will discuss how assumptions about genre affect our response to native American literary texts, and whether postcolonial geographies of margin and centre, as well as other categorizations along lines of ethnicity, nationality, gender, age and class, are pertinent to the discussion of native American literature.We will discuss various strategies for sustaining a sense of native American texts as simultaneously available to the critical responses of those schooled in the traditions of English literature, and resistant to these responses; and work towards a pedagogy that acknowledges this ambivalence. Texts will include traditional forms from native North America; works by Scott Momaday, Simon Ortiz, Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Thomas King, Tomson Highway, Sherman Alexie, Luci Tapahonso, and others; and (for a different perspective on the issues) several texts by aboriginal Australian and Maori (New Zealand) writers.

Class will include several seminar presentations by each student, and a final essay.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 009 – Television and Literature: Intersections of Narrative, Interpretation, and Cultural Commentary.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Television plays a dynamic role in the creation and sustaining of culturally significant narratives. Conventional arguments about whether television is primarily a visual or verbal medium or whether it is substantially a positive or negative influence upon society are impossible to evaluate without close examinations of specific texts and of viewers' varied reactions to their perceived intentionality. Television is an influential mass medium that viewers live with rather intimately; Bakhtin's theories about the time and energy people invest in various lifelong individual/social dialogic discourses apply here. Indeed, most people have little trouble recollecting intense involvement with and conversations about preferred television broadcasts and the stories and characters in them.

In this course, we will combine close content analysis with individual and focus group response research projects. Variations in television viewers' responses to televised texts become a window into understanding the emergence and meanings of, say, contemporary translations of traditional myths, reconfigurations of historical, political and societal dilemmas, and impulses behind compelling cultural redefinitions of values and behaviors. We will be reading several print texts and comparing them with relevant television programming. For example, we examine admonitions found in Machiavelli's The Prince alongside actions and reactions played out in the acclaimed HBO series "The Sopranos." Also, we read Martin Roper's recent New Yorker short story "Our House" and consider an episode from "Sex and the City."

There will be individual and collaborative research projects assigned, with three substantial papers and several short critiques required during the term. Students also present their findings orally to the class, which essentially forms a research community, sharing findings, insights, and implications.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 010 – Asian Pacific American Narrative. Meets with American Culture 498.003.

Instructor(s): Sarita See

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What happens to narrative in the hands of Asian Pacific American authors? How are Asian Pacific Americans narrated into – and out of – the American body politic? What are the characteristics of a narrative? What is non-narrative?

An introduction to narrative theory through readings of Asian American and Pacific Islander (specifically Hawai'i) texts, this course focuses on the construction and distortion of three basic aspects of narrative: perspective, sequence, and space. In other words, we will analyze Asian Pacific American experiments with visual, temporal, and spatial order. We will develop a common vocabulary of key narratological concepts. Taking our cue from feminist narratologist Mieke Bal, we will pay great attention to the visual aspects of narrative. Hence, our focus on narratives and narrative theory will form the basis for more general discussions of exhibition, exposition, and exposure. These in turn will anchor our exploration of the relationship between perception and narrative specifically through the positioning of Asian Pacific Americans in the U.S. Orientalist imagination.

Course requirements: active, informed participation and a total of twenty pages of writing.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

English 423 is an advanced level course in the writing (and reading) of short fiction. The primary focus of the course will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published stories. Students will be required to write two complete stories (2500-5000 words) for the workshop, and revise both by the end of the term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and occasional short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will usually consist of three to four stories each week.

Required text: Course pack

Admission: Applicants should bring a brief sample of fiction (5-10 pages) to the first meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 – Voice Lessons: Writing and Identity.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Pavarotti, Domingo, Callas – great voices of the music world? Not in this class. Instead, Hemingway, Kafka, Roth, Hong Kingston, Paley, O'Brien, Hurston, Hijuelos – great literary voices! I have focused this writing and literature course on the subject of voice because of its application to so many matters essential to good writing. A distinct writing voice is the fingerprint of a writer – a source for positive identification. Ideally, however, even writers who have found their own distinctive voice, find ways to modify it, subtly, to suit the occasion of a particular piece of writing, matching tone with subject.

Voice finds expression in a writer's attitude toward their subject, whether ironic, witty, angry, sad, desperate, indignant, or comic. Voice is an outer expression of our inner selves. Thus the phrase "finding one's voice" can mean enhancing our sense of who we are and what we think, and summoning the courage to express what we discover for others to read. As you can tell from the list of authors above, we will read diverse ethnic voices, voices that carry not only their own sound and feel, but the sound and feel - the spiritual and intellectual accents, if you will – of their special heritage. You, of course, will have plenty of opportunity to raise your own voices in class discussion of essays, novels, and short stories by professional writers, and in the workshop atmosphere of our responses to each others'writing.

Class Requirements: three 6-8 page essays, revisions possible on each; 2 page response papers for each member of the class; regular attendance; and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002 – Persuasive Writing.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL425f02/

The signers of the United States Constitution declared our freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in the United States. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. These were ordinary people doing extraordinary things with language. What about you? Do you aspire to extraordinary things, or do you simply hope to land a great job or appeal a parking ticket? Either way, you'll need to use persuasive writing. This academic term, we will increase our awareness of, respect for, and facility with persuasive writing. But our enthusiasm for and understanding of argumentative writing can grow only if we care about what we're doing (and even have some fun), so usually you will choose your own topics as we play with, analyze, and practice argumentative writing. To guide us in these challenging but rewarding enterprises, we'll use a textbook, Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, and a handbook, The Everyday Writer. We'll write almost daily, in the form of short exercises (hard copy and online), rhetorical analyses, and longer essays; plan on lots of informal writing and three formal essays of 3-8 pages each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 427 / THTREMUS 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 327. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course operates as a workshop in which students discuss 1) poems by fellow students and 2) the poems of distinguished authors, mainly contemporary, as we find them in a required anthology, handouts, poetry readings, and elsewhere. Students will report orally on each other's work, keep a journal of readings on the subject of poetry, and meet regularly with the instructor for individual tutorials. Grades are based on the quality and quantity of work, as well as class participation. Permission of instructor is required for enrollment. Leave a portfolio of 5-8 poems for the instructor during the week before class begins.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Mark Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/430/001.nsf

This class will explore the origin, development, and early formal experiments of the most important literary form of the last several centuries. In our examination of this still rather recent narrative genre, we will consider the social, economic, and technological elements that helped to make the novel and which the novel sometimes helped shape--and the question of whether the novel has now run its course as a vital and influential art form.

Our first days will be spent deliberating the various wide-ranging contemporary definitions of the term novel, considering the elements of picaresque, romance, and travel narratives, and discussing the degree to which the earliest novels conformed to or broke from these narrative forms. We will begin our reading with Part One of Cervantes' Don Quixote and pieces of early English prose fiction before settling upon that kind of realistic story that developed primarily in England sometime around 1700. We will then read Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders, Samuel Richardson's Pamela, Henry Fielding's Tom Jones, Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto, Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy, and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

I have a particular interest in how the rise of the novel corresponds to a rise in realistic graphic depictions of space and place, as well as to how it corresponds to a shift in epistemology and political and economic power, but this course will also consider issues of the author, authority and the reader; form and plot; class, gender, rebellion, and transgression; and the novel in relation to other kinds of narrative art.

In addition to heavy reading, the student work in this course will include two formal analytical papers, weekly response papers, two exams, attendance and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature - 1937-1801 - combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorians put all these parts together and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring back readers for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day, e.g., the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, and the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. What is arguably most interesting about these novels is the complicated relationship they had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code was liable, and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. These oddly subversive elements will provide the focus of this course. Our texts will include classic novels by C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, James, possibly Austen, Trollope, and/or Stevenson, and some contemporary perpsectives on the fiction through the eyes of movies based on these novels. There will also be brief selections from intellectual and cultural documents provided on our website. Requirements include two ten-page essays, a final, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin this course with a text that is perhaps neither American nor a novel: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1689). I do this not to be perverse, but because it shows the novel form as it was first developing out of the Romance, and because it shows how the society of British America was an economic and cultural product of the larger Atlantic world as opposed to fresh sprung from the soil of the Eastern seaboard. This text raises certain issues and topics we will find ourselves tracing throughout the term: travel or movement through space, the significance of place and environment, the status (gender/race/nationality/class) of the author, the narrator's persona, the representation of racial and cultural conflict, spirituality, changes in the form of the novel, and masculinity/femininity. We will read Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland (in which both a character and Enlightenment Reason spontaneously combust), Herman Melville's Moby Dick and Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (to allow us to think in very different and wonderful ways about watery worlds of men), Edith Wharton's House of Mirth, Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes Are Watching God, William Faulkner's Sound and the Fury and, ending with the post-World War II Pacific and Native-American world, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony. You will give one brief oral presentation, bring in reading questions every class, and write three short papers. Attendance and participation are an absolute must..

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Zemgulys

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/433/001.nsf

This course will explore novels by British and American writers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in light of these writers' attempts to innovate upon the novel form. We will pay special attention to the relation between experiments in literary form and the theme of knowledge in these novels (themes regarding self-knowledge, narrative omniscience, and discovery) and to representations of non-literary modes of knowledge gathering (such as geography, history, psychology, and economics). The course will conclude with mid-twentieth-century novels that engage with the themes we've explored, and that will allow us to think about the legacies and conventions of the ostensibly anti-conventional modern novel of the early twentieth century. The reading list will include fictional works by Henry James, Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Ralph Ellison, and Tayeb Salih, as well as non-fictional essays collected in a course reader.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how several contemporary authors define the novel form. We'll discuss novels mainly from a writer's perspective, considering architecture, approaches to character, narration, language, imagery, and voice, as well as the cultural and artistic dialogues these novels engage in. Over the term we'll read work primarily but not exclusively by North American writers: Michael Cunningham, Kathryn Davis, Louise Erdrich, Kent Haruf, Toni Morrison, and Michael Ondaatje. We will consider the ways in which each of these writers conceptualizes the novel and the art and act of story-making; the interweaving of narrative and lyrical impulses; the possible relationships to other arts and to individual and collective histories. This course may be of particular interest to undergraduate fiction writers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Leigh A Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, a survey of the development of theatre from the ancient Greeks to the 17th century, should be elected by all Theatre concentrators. The focus is on the production of theatre in its historical and social context, but we shall also study representative plays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the rise of modern drama in the Western world by concentrating on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Brecht. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to read a dramatic text for its performative qualities and its potential for enactment. Although no previous experience in the study of drama or theater is required, the course will begin by concentrating on the differences between the modern repertory and the forms we associate with Classical and Shakespearean dramatic conventions. Other topics of consideration include: the transformation from melodrama to modern drama; the social consciousness of the twentieth-century stage; and the rise of the female figure as subject of dramatic inquiry.

Requirements: There will be three papers of 5-7 pages each; a midterm; and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – This course satisfies the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover texts in American literature from the colonial period of the early seventeenth-century writings of John Smith to the 1830s. We will examine how "American" writers wrestle with certain concepts, for instance, the New World, being American, freedom, democracy, slavery, and the Indian, that all merge to construct a unique American personage. We will be reading works by John Smith, Mary Rowlandson, Anne Bradstreet, Crevecoeur, William Bradford, Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, and James Fenimore Cooper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 – Three Modern Poets: Pound, Eliot, and Stevens. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine what three major writers – Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens – have to teach us about the kinds of relations possible among art, society, and individual experience. We will consider their chief works both in themselves and as responses to personal, political, and literary problems such as the construction of modernism, the impact of two world wars and the psychological problems of twentieth-century life. The readings are primarily poetry, both lyrics and longer works like Pound's Mauberley sequence, Eliot's The Waste Land, and Stevens' Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction, with some critical prose by the authors themselves. We proceed by a mixture of lecture and discussion. There are two papers (about six pages each) and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 479 / CAAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 – Twentieth-century African American fictional narratives. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 274 and CAAS 201 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine how certain fictional narratives by twentieth-century African American writers represent race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will be reading works by Claude McKay, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Andrea Lee, Ntozake Shange, and Paule Marshall, to name a few writers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 – e.e. cummings. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of e.e.cummings, one of the great artists and personalities of the 20th century. Cummings is primarily known for his poetry, but he was also a significant painter, playwright, novelist, critic, and aesthetician. During the course, we will study cummings' complete poetic corpus (of almost 1000 poems), one of his novels, The Enormous Room, one of his plays, Him, and some of his criticism, as he delivers it orally in his famous Charles Eliot Norton (non-) lectures. For his life, we will read Richard Kennedy's biography of cummings, Dreams in the Mirror. For his visual art and aesthetics, we will read Milton Cohen's Poet and Painter, which explores cummings' sketches, painting, and artistic ideas. Requirements for the course will be two medium length papers (5-10 pages) during the term and one longer paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 – William Faulkner/ Robert Hayden.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The largest portion of the syllabus for this course will be given to William Faulkner, whose fiction has exerted a powerful influence on writers around the world. Likely texts are two of his most experimental and highly-orchestrated novels – The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom – and two of his most controversial popular works – Light in August and The Hamlet (the first volume of the Snopes trilogy), as well as several short stories. Robert Hayden's Collected Poems investigates some of the same history that Faulkner scrutinizes, but from an African-American perspective. Together the two authors carry forward themes central to American literature in the 20th century: region and nation, modern sexuality, racial and class identity. At the same time we shall consider questions of career-formation and canonization in these exemplary cases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 – Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 – Doing Things with Theory.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dwthomas/484_ft02.htm

This course asks about theory as a form of action. Is theory an entertaining but inconsequential meddling in cultural habits and values? Or does it clarify who we are and how we might do well to act? Many who ask such questions hope to establish whether politicized theoretical approaches – from Marxism and feminism to queer theory and multiculturalism – constitute forms of activism. But a still more fundamental question lies in our way: how can theory affect our ways of thinking and guide our ways of acting? This course spotlights desires and assumptions that underwrite key modern theoretical arguments in order to illuminate our own motives in theorizing about literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This colloquium is limited to students already enrolled in the English Honors Program who intend to complete Honors theses in Winter 2003. Through a series of intensive discussions and exercises, we'll explore strategies and methods for working through every aspect of the thesis project: refining research areas, working with advisors, choosing and using secondary materials, and drafting and re-drafting for the most effective argument and prose. Our format will be that of a workshop, in which we circulate work continuously over the course of the term; each student should end the term with a workable draft of the thesis project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an honors thesis – your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 – Modern Wars and Modern Memory.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"I was just thinking of a good title for an art book. From Bismark to Hitler" Stein writes in Paris France. It is a title that would have made terrible sense to anyone reading Stein's account of her adopted country, first published in England in the summer of 1940, as Paris fell to the Germans and the French signed an armistice agreement with their conquerors. In this same book Stein notes wryly that "there is a great deal of war-time in history." Her grim observation certainly captures the truth for anyone living during the first half of this century, and it will be the business of this course to investigate what it means to live and write in a time of war.

It is a truism worth careful investigation that the First World War profoundly affected modern art and modern cultures. We will not only seek to discover more fully just what this general assertion means; we will also study the writings around other conflicts central to the modern period. Students will have the opportunity, as well, to focus on writing from wars occurring during the period covered by this course.

Michael Herr, toward the end of Dispatches, his book about the war in Viet Nam, tells us that war cannot ever be left behind: "Those who remember the past are condemned to repeat it too, that's a little history joke." Clearly, to bring war and writing together is to consider the ways wars are remembered and forgotten by those who have lived through them. Readings in this course will often revolve around issues of memory and memorialization, and we will be working throughout the term with a selection of the continually growing body of work concerning social and individual memory.

One of the more general aims of this course is to investigate the uses and abuses of words, disciplines, and categories of understanding that permeate the field of modernist studies today: history and historicist understandings of culture; the vexed category of the political; popular culture and the status of the documentary; memory and trauma studies. We will read critical and theoretical texts each week that are germane to our readings from the modern period.

Authors that we are likely to study will include Tim O'Brien, Frederick Manning, Erich Maria Remarque, Wilfred Owen, Vera Britain, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, and Rebecca West. Students who are interested in focusing on visual materials (photographs, paintings, film) will have opportunities for that work. Twentieth-century wars have also been media events, and the nature of reporting and propaganda might be a subject for students' projects. A number of recent histories of the world wars have attempted to address more fully the experience of those wars for peoples other that the citizens of the United States and the most militarily powerful European combatants. There will be room for students to choose work in these areas that have traditionally been less fully studied by Anglo-American history as well. Course requirements will include in-class reports, a presentation of work in progress, and a final, extensive research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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