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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Environment


This page was created at 7:40 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ENVIRON 139 / NRE 139. First-Year Seminar in the Environment.

Section 019 Environment, Sustainability & Social Change. Meets with University Courses 151.003.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand, at both the global and local levels, the emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will address the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community-based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Over the course of the academic term, seminar members will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and will utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be primarily individual, but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 201 / NRE 201. Ecological Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Diana (jimd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre301/

A course involving lectures and discussions on ecological principles and concepts underlying the management and use of natural resources, with consideration of socio-economic factors and institutional roles. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to matters concerning the allocation of natural resources and the quality of our environment. Topics covered include biodiversity, endangered species, exploitation practices, tropical deforestation, agriculture, air and water pollution, energy production and use, waste disposal, and the role of politics and economics in environmental issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 256 / ANTHRCUL 256 / NRE 256. Culture, Adaptation, and Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/256/001.nsf

This course explores anthropological approaches to human relationships with their environments and resources. We will examine diverse conceptions of culture and nature, and time and space, and the impacts that contemporary global forces are having on indigenous societies and their ecosystems. We will be particularly interested in the relative strengths and weaknesses of materialistic and cultural analyses of human-environment relationships, and models that attempt to combine them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 270 / NRE 270 / ENVRNSTD 270. Our Common Future: Ecology, Economics & Ethics of Sustainable Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ivette Perfecto (perfecto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/nre/270/001.nsf

An interdisciplinary foundation of the concepts and strategies of sustainability from an ecological, economic, and socio-political perspective. The quest for sustainable development is the most critical, yet challenging, issues of our time. Defining what sustainable development is and how it ought to be accomplished is profoundly influencing government, academics, business, science, and people's culture and livelihoods at the local, national, and global scale. The disciplines of ecology, economics, sociology, and politics are experiencing major paradigm shifts that seek to re-address our proper role and influence on the planet and its resources. Is knowledge (traditional, scientific, and/or technical) relevant for addressing issues of sustainability? Can more accurate pricing, accounting, and open markets redress environmental degradation and resource depletion? What are we sustaining? For whom? For how long? Who are the "stakeholders"? Are sustainability and economic growth incompatible? Is a new global ethic essential? Through readings, discussions, and assignments, we will explore the discourse, perspectives, methodologies, and limitations of interrelated disciplines all essential for charting a new common future. Full (book) case studies in environmental and natural resource issues from three major professional perspectives are presented as real working examples of how environmental policies and outcomes are shaped in practice. The aim is to foster critical thinking and to evaluate what we all can contribute to the pursuit of a sustainable biosphere.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 300 / NRE 300. Special Problems and Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of eight credits will be counted toward degree requirements.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 305 / NRE 305. Society & Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Brechin (sbrechin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an introductory, overview course in environmental sociology designed primarily for upper-level undergraduates. No formal course work in sociology or other social sciences or environmental sciences is required, but students will likely find it helpful to have a background in these areas. Topics discussed include sociological theory and the environment; environmental values, beliefs, and behavior; the environmental movement and protests; environmental discrimination, equity and justice, the role of organizations in both creating and managing environmental problems; population-environment dynamics; the social impacts of resource use and conservation practices; environmental issues in developing countries and internationally; economics, public policy and the environment; the limits to growth debate; and possible society-environment futures.

Together we will investigate the interplay among society, human behavior, and the biophysical environment. We attempt to accomplish two related objectives: (1) a better understanding of how society functions and of how humans behave by looking at our interactions with nature, natural resources, and the larger biophysical environment; and (2) a better understanding of our present environmental situation and futures by investigating the forces that shape our society.

Weekly discussion of assigned material will be an integral part of the course. Discussion of current events will be encouraged. Assignments consist of take-home examinations and a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 333 / NRE 333. Writing About Natural Resources and Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: junior standing and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 337 / EEB 355 / NRE 337. Woody Plants I: Biology and Identification.

Section 001 Meets with NRE 437.

Instructor(s): Burton V Barnes (bvb@umich.edu), Melanie Elizabet Gunn (mgunn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre337/

Ecology, biology and identification of trees, shrubs, and vines are studied in weekly field trips. Woody plants are studied in their natural ecosystems - including upland (oak-hickory, beech-sugar maple, lake plain), wetland (swamp, bog), and floodplain forests. Non-native species and ornamental plants are taught in the Nichols Arboretum, Saginaw Forest, and Main Campus. Lecture topics include vegetative and reproductive morphology; woody plant biology, ecology, and diversity; variation and genetics; systematics of woody plants; ornamental plants; and forest ecosystems of eastern and western North America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 360 / NRE 360. Behavior and Environment.

Section 001 Building a Model of Human Nature using Knowledge from Environmental Psychology. Meets with NRE 560 and Urban Planning 560.

Instructor(s): Raymond De Young (rdeyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/nre360/

This course deals with two central themes: First, environmental problems are people problems, requiring an understanding of how people think, what they care about, what motivated them, and the conditions under which they behave most reasonably and creatively. Second, human behavior makes the most sense when studied in the context of the environment both present and evolutionary. This course builds a model of human nature based upon research in the field of environmental psychology.

The course will explore such topics as environmental perception and knowledge; preferred environments and coping with the failure of preference; and mental attention fatigue and restoration. It then applies this model to such issues as common property resource management and the psychology of sustainability.

The course is cross-disciplinary both in emphasis and student population with the disciplines of natural resource policy, planning and management; environmental education and communication; conservation behavior and conservation psychology; landscape architecture and urban planning; and green and sustainable business typically represented.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 370 / NRE 370 / ARCH 423. Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard K. Norton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/up/423/001.nsf

This course provides a general overview of the field of urban and environmental planning for students who have little background in the area. Presenting different speakers for many of the topics covered, the course introduces students to a wide variety of planning issues and to planning-oriented faculty and professionals.

The requirements for the course are as follows:

  • An initial short field assignment (worth 5 percent of the final grade)
  • Two 3 to 4-page memos integrating the lecture and the reading materials (worth 15 percent of the final grade each)
  • Midterm (First Half) Examination (worth 20 percent of the final grade)
  • Final Examination (worth 25 percent of the final grade)
  • Attendance, participation, and contribution at lectures and discussion sessions (combined worth 20 percent of the final grade)

Required Readings: (available at Ulrich's Book Store or online)

  • Levy, John M. 2003. Contemporary Urban Planning (6th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Roseland, Mark. 1998. Toward Sustainable Communities. Stony Creek, CT: New Society Publishers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 395. Tools for Environmental Problem Solving.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Bobbi S. Low (bobbilow@umich.edu), Stephen Salant (ssalant@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Math 115 or 112. (4). (ID).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/environ/395/001.nsf

    This novel interdisciplinary course on problem solving is a core course in the new LSA-SNRE Program in the Environment. It draws on techniques (e.g., game theory, evolutionary dynamics, linear and nonlinear programming, sequential decision theory) from several disciplines: biology, economics, operations research, and political science. Further, it bolsters some very basic skills in mathematics and Bayesian statistics.

    A major goal of the course is to help students to look beyond the details of a particular problem in order first to classify it and then to recognize its analytical structure. Is the particular problem under consideration an optimization problem or an equilibrium problem? If an optimization problem, what type of problem: unconstrained or constrained? If constrained, linear or nonlinear? and so forth. Often seemingly dissimilar problems arising in wildly different context (some biological, some not) turn out to be analytically identical.

    The course develops central ideas in two areas: (1) optimizing behavior of a single agent; and (2) equilibrium behavior of multiple agents. These problems arise repeatedly in many decisions. What is the best way to maximize productivity of some ecosystem, if: there are no constraints or other considerations? if other people have different agendas from yours? The course will teach analytical approaches that are simultaneously fruitful in both the social and "hard" sciences. Every point discussed will be illustrated with a matched pair of examples one from the sciences and the other drawn from the social sciences. Every exercise will be done with multiple examples that reach across disciplines. Students will learn how to solve the problems by hand, and they will learn how simple spreadsheet programs (Excel) can facilitate their analyses.

    Throughout their lives and in their environmental work, students will encounter problems of optimization and equilibrium, in various disguises. We hope to help students learn to classify the problems and then to see through their guises, so that they can recognize and greet as familiar friends any new problems they encounter. Throughout the course, we will discuss other methods techniques, setting the context for students. Thus we hope that students will take away not only preparation for advanced courses, but a lifelong analytical approach to problem solving.

    Finally, we hope to help them develop their analytical techniques for solving the most-frequently encountered problems.

    Students completing the course will have excellent preparation for courses such as high-level economics, game theory, behavioral ecology, and some courses in sociology and psychology.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 398 / NRE 398. Natural Resources Internship Program.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty sponsor. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credit hours for internships. See the SNRE Career Advisor in the Career Resource Center for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and SNRE Career Planning and Placement Director.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 400(ENVRNSTD 420). Independent Work in Environmental Studies.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVRNSTD 240 and cognates pertinent to the study. Permission must be granted by Director prior to enrollment. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated four times, for a total of 12 credits.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is an independent study, typically with a practical component. The subject is the general area of environmental issues and may concern environmental science, environmental policy, aspects of campus management or community service with environmental implications.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ENVIRON 411 / NRE 411. Fluvial Ecosystems.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J. David Allan (dallan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 311 or an upper-level course in aquatic ecology or hydrology. (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/nre/411/001.nsf

    Introduces key concepts and theory pertinent to understanding and managing fluvial ecosystems (rivers and streams). Emphasis on rivers as large-scale physical and biological systems; properties and processes. Laboratory includes intensive comparative field study of distinctive types of Michigan rivers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 415 / NRE 415. Wildlife Behavior and Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of BIOLOGY, including BIOLOGY 152. ENVIRON 438 recommended. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre415/

    Basic theory in behavioral ecology and life history strategies. Basic natural selection theory, environmental constraints, and the evolution of behavior and life history strategies are stressed.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    ENVIRON 422 / EEB 440 / NRE 422. Biology of Fishes.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): William L. Fink (wfink@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bio440/

    Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, bio geography, ecology, and reproduction. The systematic position of fish among vertebrates is discussed and exemplary assemblages examined. Special attention is given to the effect of the physical properties of water on form, function and mode of life of fishes. Discussions examine current papers in the primary literature.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 423 / EEB 441 / NRE 423. The Biology of Fishes Laboratory.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gerald Ray Smith (grsmith@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (1). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bio440/

    Optional laboratory course accompanying ENVIRON 422, providing an introduction to the field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examining the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of world fishes.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 430 / EEB 489 / NRE 430. Soil Properties and Processes.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Donald R Zak (drzak@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre430/

    Soils as central components of terrestrial ecosystems. Major emphasis is placed on physical, chemical, and biological properties and their relationships to plant growth and ecosystem processes. Understanding is developed using a combination of lectures, field- and laboratory-based exercises, and individual research. The function of soils in forested ecosystems is the primary focus; however, examples are drawn from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems.

    This course centers on the overlap of soil science, forest ecology, and ecosystem ecology. Our goal is to understand:

    1. how the interactions of landform, topography, climate, and biota over time lead to the patterns of soil development and the distribution of soil types that we observe within the landscape;
    2. how physical, chemical, and biological properties of forest soils affect water and nutrient availability to plants and, ultimately, ecosystem productivity; and
    3. how nutrients are cycled within forest ecosystems and how these processes are influenced by land management practices.

    In the field portion of the course, we will sample and describe soils of four forest ecosystems and observe first-hand how differences in landform, topography, climate and biota influence soil development. In the laboratory we will analyze our soil samples for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties. Using these data in conjunction with field data, each student will select two of the four ecosystems for detailed comparison in a term paper. Although we will focus our attention on local forest ecosystems of Michigan, skills learned in this course may be broadly applied within a variety of terrestrial ecosystem types in other geographic regions.

    Prerequisites: Students are expected to have a background in chemistry and biology. In particular, a working knowledge of chemical equilibria, ionic solution chemistry, pH, and oxidation-reduction reactions is highly recommended. Students without such background should consult with the instructor before enrolling. Also useful (although not required) is familiarity with biochemistry, plant physiology, microbiology, geology, and local flora. You will find it very helpful if you have had, or are currently enrolled in, Woody Plants (ENVIRON 337). The lectures and laboratory exercises in Soil Properties and Processes have been designed to complement Forest Ecology (ENVIRON 435), and we highly recommend that you enroll in these courses concurrently!

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    ENVIRON 432 / NRE 432. Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Paul J Richards (pauljr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Principles and processes affecting hydrologic cycles of forested watersheds: precipitation, interception, infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and stream flow. Major emphasis on how hydrologic processes affect watershed management of forest and other terrestrial ecosystems, and how watershed management affects water yield and quality. Floods, soil erosion, and water pollution will be emphasized as special problems.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 435 / NRE 435. Forest Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Burton V. Barnes (bvb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 337. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre435/

    Landscape ecosystems and forest species are emphasized in weekly field trips and lectures stressing the ecology of species and the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Landscape ecosystems are studied by integrating physiography, climate, soil, and vegetation. Major emphasis on physiography and site-species relationships, establishment ecology, and competitive and mutualistic relationships. Fire ecology and genetic ecology are also stressed. Special field trips to northern Michigan and the Great Smoky Mountains.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 455 / NRE 455. Lab in Field Ecology.

    Section 001 THIS COURSE WILL MEET SEPTEMBER 13 - OCTOBER 20, FRI. EVENINGS BEGINNING AT 7 PM AND CONCLUDING SUN. EVENINGS AT 7 PM. Meets with Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 477 (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

    Instructor(s): John H Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu), Ivette Perfecto (perfecto@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in ecology or advanced undergraduate biology, and permission of instructor. (5). (Excl).

    Mini/Short course

    Credits: (5).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 477.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ENVIRON 492 / NRE 492 / UP 492. Environmental Justice: Domestic and International.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Bunyan Bryant Jr (bbryant@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    R&E

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~snre492/492.html

    This is primarily a lecture course. Information in the course includes:

    1. the definition of environmental racism, environmental equity, environmental justice, and environmental advocacy,
    2. key research issues in the field of environmental justice which includes race vs. income, intent vs. nonintent, pollution prevention vs. pollution control, cause and effect vs. association,
    3. understanding energy and its relation with environmental justice,
    4. the social structure of accumulation vs. the social structure of sustainability,
    5. comparing issues of environmental justice within the U.S. and within developing countries,
    6. comparing the Basel Treaty and the Organization of African Unity's ban on the transport of toxic waste internationally, and the First National Environmental Leadership Summits Seventeen Principles of Environmental Justice.

    Both domestic and international examples will be used in the course to enhance teaching and learning. Students will be required to: (1) take a midterm and a final examination, and (2) develop case studies on environmental justice.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Graduate Course Listings for ENVIRON.


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    This page was created at 7:40 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.


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