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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 7:47 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


FRENCH 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from FRENCH 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/french/101/001.nsf

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 103. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is the continuation of FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

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FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the coordinator. Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be two hourly exams, three 25 minutes quizzes, a final exam, compositions, and two speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

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FRENCH 111. First Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of FRENCH 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/french/111/001.nsf

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term, students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

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FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

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FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

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FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 003 – Contemporary Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/french/235/002.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union - The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

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FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 002, 004 – Contemporary Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Roger Butler-Borruat (rebb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/french/235/002.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union - The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Le Roman Francais au XXeme siecle: du moderne au postmoderne. This course will be conducted entirely in French.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the 1950s and 1960s Les Editions de Minuit publishing house in Paris undertook the task of promoting some of the most unusual avant-garde literature of the day. Many of the texts produced at this time were termed "modern". As is customary with literary movements, this modernism was soon brandished as an example of the next style against which writers should react and rebel. This gave rise to the birth of "postmodernism" – a term applied liberally to many aspects of artistic endeavor.

In this course, we will read and analyze texts of the modern period, attempting to discern just what qualifies as "modern". In turn, we will contrast them with examples of "postmodern" texts of the 1980s.

We will use critical theory of the day as a springboard; and we will also maintain an on-going discussion of the disparities between what is called "popular" versus "literary" fiction. Ultimately, through theory and close reading of the novels, we will attempt to understand the intricacies and paradoxical nature of the modern/postmodern popular/literary dichotomies.

Texts will include selections of literary theory and the following texts:

  1. Pour un nouveau roman (Alain Robbe-Grillet)
  2. La Jalousie (Alain Roobe-Grillet)
  3. L'Amant (Margurite Duras)
  4. Exercises de style (Raymond Queneau)
  5. Tropismes (Natalie Sarraute)
  6. Lac (Jean Echenoz)
  7. La Salle de Bains (Jean-Philippe Toussaint)
  8. Rose Melie Rose (Marie Redonnet)

This course will be conducted entirely in French.

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FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002, 004 – Writing Love: Romantic literature and the expression of human emotion.

Instructor(s): Claudia Moscovici

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Romanticism connected the sentiment of passionate love with artistic expression perhaps more closely than any other literary movement by describing both as the undistorted expression of intense and genuine emotion. Perhaps it is this causal link between literature and feeling that contributes to the splendor of romanticism and to its vulnerability. For modernist and postmodernist writers would attack precisely the intimate connections between human identity, emotions, and their poetic and passionate expressions by suggesting that it is naïve and unfounded to assume that true emotions are the basis of human nature, that such a nature exists at all, that even if it exists, it can be communicated without distortion and, most importantly, that art should have anything to do with lived experience. The modernist valorization of the dandy offers a striking example of the assumption that it may be, in fact, the artificial constructions of art that guide the conventions we assume to be natural in life. Once human identity becomes denaturalized, the expression of feeling, poetic or not, can no longer make claims to sincerity and authenticity. Yet should we be thoroughly convinced of the way modernism and postmodernism describe the connection between emotion and art as opposed to the models offered by Romanticism? Is the connection between emotion and art necessarily naïve? What forms does in take in Romantic literature? In this course we will read nineteenth-century French novels that address the theme of love to explore the beauty and complexity of Romantic descriptions of feeling. This course is conducted in French. Required Course Readings Stendhal, Le Rouge et le Noir: Chronique de 1830 (1830) Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (1857) Charles Baudelaire, selections from Les Fleurs du Mal (1857) and Salons of 1846 and 1859 Evaluation Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), your questions and comments on the presentations given by other students (10%), four short essays (40%), and very active class participation (20%).

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FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003 – Nineteenth-Century: The Era of Revolutions.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As the European nineteenth-century became known as "the age of revolution", the word 'revolution' was simultaneously associated with one country, France, and a privileged space of origin, Paris, where the founding event occurred: the 1789 French Revolution. With its succession of regimes and social uprisings, the influential 19th century French political history can indeed be read as a constant "struggle between Revolution and Restoration" (Furet) aimed at repeating, completing or eradicating the aftermath of the 1789 Revolution that was both admired and hated.

Leaning on these pro- and counter-revolutionary perspectives, this course will use as landmarks the most important revolutions, revolts, civil war and political coups of 19th century France, while presenting a selection of political, cultural discourses and practices reflecting these conflicting views. It will also evoke another revolution, industrial this time, an indispensable component to our understanding of the socioeconomic characteristics of this era.

This course will proceed as follows:

Introduction:

1. Survey of 19th-century French political and cultural history.

2. What are revolutions, revolts, civil wars and political coups?

3. Paris, capital of the revolutionary crowds and "of the 19th century." (Taine, Benjamin).

I. The 1789 French Revolution:

First "modern" revolution (Tocqueville, Michelet, Furet)

Universal rights:

a. Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (National Assembly, 1789)

b. Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Citizeness (Olympe de Gouges, 1791)

II. The Coup d'Etat of Napoleon Bonaparte: November 9, 1799 ("18th Brumaire Year VIII"):

The First Empire and the Bourbon Restoration: 1804-1830 (Stendhal)

III. The "July Days": The 1830 Revolution

The Barricade (Delacroix, Hugo)

IV. The "Beautiful" Revolution: February 1848

a. Socialism, Feminism, Utopia (Saint-Simon, Fourier, Tristan, Sand)

b. Print Culture: Newspapers, Lithography, Caricature (Girardin, Philipon, Daumier)

V. The "Class Struggle": June 1848 (Marx, Tocqueville)

VI. The Coup d'Etat of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte: December 2, 1851

a. The "New Paris" of the Second Empire: Napoleon III's and Haussmann's urban renovation and "strategic embellishment" (Benjamin)

b. Painters of Modern Life: Baudelaire, Manet

c. Separate (private and public) Spheres: Morisot, Caillebotte

d. Railway Stations: Monet, Manet

VII. "The Terrible Year": 1871 Civil War

The Commune (Vallès, Michel) / Crowd psychology (Taine, Le Bon, Freud, Zola)

VIII. The Centennial of the French Revolution and the 1889 Universal Exhibit:

The Eiffel Tower (Barthes)

Audiovisual material will be presented in class. A course pack and a French grammar book will be required. Final grade: one small oral presentation, two journals, two quizzes, one final essay (3-5 pages), and very active class participation.

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FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 004 – Writing Love: Romantic literature and the expression of human emotion.

Instructor(s): Claudia Moscovici

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See French 270.002.

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FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – French Anti-Globalization.

Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Among other claims to fame, France is now known as the country in which a rural activist destroyed a Macdonald's. It is also home to one of the most active anti-globalization organizations, ATTAC. The President of France has even compared French to indigenous languages of Brazil in their common struggle against the global hegemony of English! This course will offer a look at the often strange and yet generally serious world of French anti-globalization discourse, from Internet tracts to high-toned journalism to grimly comic fiction. It will include a close look at the history of French attempts to comprehend, resist, or otherwise come to terms with the United States. We will try to use this topic not only as a chance to learn something about French culture and society but also to think about what and how Americans can (or can't) learn from the ways in which others see us. Varied readings (literary, journalistic, militant, etc.); several short papers; class and small-group discussions; brief individual and group presentations including some based on student research using Web sources.

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FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – Family and Individuality in 20th-Century France.

Instructor(s): Benedicte Boisseron (beny@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where are the boundaries of the familial sphere? How do you define your individuality within and without the family? France is well known for having a culture of tradition and heritage deeply rooted in family values. Yet, the modern movements of globalization and individualization have reshaped the familial structure in France. Are those changes for the better or for the worse?

The course will address issues of individuality, privacy, and love in relation with to concept of family. Its goal is to consider the various functions the family held throughout the 20th Century and how new patterns of family organization and function refashioned French society at large. We shall compare modern patterns of individuality and family with older ones, as articulated by writers of the first half of the century.

The course will invite students to discuss issues of familial space using a range of materials including literature, films, TV commercials, and magazine clips. The course will be taught in French.

Class discussions and a series of one page reaction papers will help students improve their spoken and written French. An oral presentation, a midterm paper, and a final paper will also be required

Required Text: Course pack of FRENCH 274 "La famille française au 20ième siècle" (including short stories and articles)

Films:

  • La gloire de mon père
  • Tati Danielle
  • La vie est un long fleuve tranquille
  • Ma vie en rose

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FRENCH 337. Seminar in Translation.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/french/337/001.nsf

This is primarily a practical course in techniques and problems of translation, both from French to English and from English to French. Texts for translation will be chosen from a wide variety of materials, with options for some projects using student-chosen texts. Frequent short writing assignments, brief in-class presentations, and group projects. Some review of grammatical structures, as needed and as relevant to translation issues. We will also read and discuss a remarkable and unusual book on translation by Douglas Hofstadter: Le Ton Beau de Marot (in English, except for the title).

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FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – New Voices of African Literature in the French Speaking World. Meets with CAAS 358.002

Instructor(s): Alain Mabanckou

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides students with an overview of the history and dynamics of African Literature within the French Speaking World. Since the 90's the perception and role of literature has changed dramatically. A new generation of African and Caribbean writers has appeared with new issues. In particular, we will concentrate on these changes and why is so important to analyze these complex issues related to immigration as part of the need to construct collective and individual identities of the "Black subject".

Required work:

  • Class attendance and participation are required.
  • One oral presentation.
  • Three short papers (5-7 pages)
  • One written question per class and to be discussed in class. These questions will give you a chance to participate in class discussions.
  • No final exam

Required books:

  1. Abdourahman Waberi. Le Pays sans ombre
  2. J.R. Essomba. Le Paradis du Nord
  3. Henri Lopes. Tribaliques
  4. Emmanuel Dongala. Jazz et Vin de palme

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FRENCH 367. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – The Jealous Imagination: Depicting an Unavowed Emotion.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For ages, writers have felt drawn to portraying the painful yet profoundly imaginative experience of jealousy. Jealousy would almost seem intrinsically literary; what, after all, does the suspicious lover do but invent scenes, scrutinize character, and imagine scenarios? At the dawn of the Renaissance, Jean Lemaire compares with bittersweet playfulness the professional writer's dependency on sponsors to that of a jealous parakeet spurned by its mistress in the "Épître de l'amant verd." In a similar vein, Ronsard's anxiety over his beloved's faithfulness hides his nervousness concerning his audience and the attention his poetry will continue to enjoy.

What do we do, as readers, but examine motives and second-guess intent? Already in medieval times, Béroul exploits uncertainty over the plot in order to place his readers in the position of the jealous king: are Tristan and Iseult sleeping together, or not? We will examine a tradition of short fiction, from the fabliaux to the Heptaméron, which calls upon the reader to judge ambiguous gestures and acts in a way that parallels the hypotheses and deductions the jealous lover feels endlessly compelled to entertain.

Last but not least, the literary depiction of jealousy anticipates most the modern psychoanalytic findings concerning jealousy. From Molière comes the key insight that the jealous lover's frantic worrying stems from a crisis not over the beloved so much as over his or her own self image. Racine builds his masterpiece, Andromaque, around the idea that we would rather be hated than ignored by the person in whom we have vested the power to see us as we wish we could really be. Finally, no study of the depiction of jealousy would be complete without Shakespeare's exposition of two different, fundamental types of jealousy in Othello.

We will trace how jealousy has acted as a topic, motive, and, ultimately, form for fiction from one of the first romances to one of France's first "psychological" novels, Lafayette's La Princesse de Montpensier.

Grades will reflect work on three papers, a short presentation, participation in class discussion and a few short assignments.

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FRENCH 380. Intermediate Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – This course will be conducted entirely in French.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235 and one additional FRENCH course numbered 250 and above. A maximum of six credits of FRENCH 380, 414, and BA 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Having attained a solid base in comprehension and communication strategies in French, students will have the opportunity to enhance their linguistic skills while learning about one of the most dynamic aspects of French culture: the Francophone Business world.

Class participants will be exposed to the differences between business situations in France and those in the U.S.; and they will learn to function comfortably within the cultural and linguistic register of the Francophone business domain.

We will study the basic elements of French and Francophone commerce, industry, and international trade, as well as the more practical skills of telephone conversations, letter writing, interview techniques, and general cultural interface in a business setting.

Typical examples of French companies will be studied and presented by students, using the Internet as their research source for the most up-to-date information. Videos, television excerpts, and newspaper articles will complement our text Carte de Visite, which itself includes video, audio, and supplementary conversation materials. We will use the grammar explanation and exercise books Grammaire by Hachette to continue improving linguistic skills.

Grades will be determined by writing assignments, class presentations, Midterm, Final, grammar work, and class participation.

This course will be conducted entirely in French.

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FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 438 / ROMLING 456 / EDCURINS 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alain E Martinossi

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods of teaching secondary level foreign languages. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. Throughout the course, student will actively and reflectively practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the School of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to:

  • become familiar with the 5 goals of the standards for foreign language learning
  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching
  • participate in professional electronic discussions in order to further explore issues discussed in class.

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FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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