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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 7:48 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


GERMAN 100. Intensive Elementary Course.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 101, 102 or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/100/Kursseite.html

This is an intensive introductory course equivalent to the first two terms of college German and intended for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. The course proceeds at a rapid pace, so regular attendance is imperative. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Textbook
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

    Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

    • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
    • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
    • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
    • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

    The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty German 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

    By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

    Required Texts:

    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
    • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac)Houghton Mifflin
    • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

    Section 008 MUSIC STUDENTS ONLY.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/101/Kursseite.html

    German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

    The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

    By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

    Required Texts:

    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
    • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac)Houghton Mifflin
    • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/german/102/001.nsf

    German 102 is the continuation of German 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

    Required Texts

    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Textbook
    • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook
    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
    • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
    • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
    • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
    • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
    • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

    Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

    • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
    • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
    • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
    • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, or 102. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/german/103/001.nsf

    German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

    The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty German 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

    Required Texts:

    • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500
    Recommended:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition , Macmillan
    • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
    • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning , McGraw-Hill
    • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., CD-Rom, Prentice-Hall
    • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Tutorial Software Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 205. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The objective of this course is to overcome the silence which you may experience when attempting to articulate everyday needs in German. In this course, you will hone your German conversation skills by learning basic idiomatic expressions and by building a fundamental vocabulary. In-class and out-of-class exercises will place you inside a bank where you may open an account or order checks (without financial allowances); you will find victuals on the food market or an apartment on the housing market; you will learn both to describe physical discomfort and to get your hair trimmed without physical discomfort.

    In addition, newspaper or magazine articles along with films and music segments may illustrate the German cultural landscape at large. Active class participation, occasional vocabulary quizzes, and short oral presentations establish the course requirements.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 221. Accelerated Third Semester German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed GERMAN 230 or 231. Four credits granted to those who have completed GERMAN 102 or 103. (5). (Excl).

    Credits: (5).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/231/Kursseite.html

    This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). It covers the same content as German 231, but with an extra day of class each week for additional review and speaking practice, so that by the end of the academic term, students in German 221 and 231 will be at the same level. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt , as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each term for the best final video in German 221/231.

    Required Text:

    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

    • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main 221/231 course page]:

    • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
    • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
    • Frisch, Max, Andorra , Suhrkamp
    • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
    • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
    • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

    Other Recommended Texts:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 230. Intensive Second-Year Course.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/230/Kursseite.html

    Required Texts:

    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
    • Thomas Brussig: Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee (available at the bookstores)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

    • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Reading Journals"

    • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary , Diogenes, Zuerich
    • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
    • Frisch, Max, Andorra , Suhrkamp
    • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
    • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland , dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

    Other Recommended Texts:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).
    This is an intensive intermediate course, equivalent to two terms of second-year college German, which will reinforce and extend the grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and reading skills developed in first-year German. There will be a wide variety of readings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary, historical, philosophical, and scientific texts, and students will read (and watch the movie version of) a humorous novel about growing up in the DDR, Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee. There will also be an entertaining and interesting variety of German movies and videos. The course proceeds at a rapid pace, so regular attendance is imperative. Other course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. By the end of the course, students should be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the department and the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/231/Kursseite.html

    In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt , as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in German 221/231.

    Required Text:

    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

    • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main 221/231 course page]:

    • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary , Diogenes, Zuerich
    • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
    • Frisch, Max, Andorra , Suhrkamp
    • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
    • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
    • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland , dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

    Other Recommended Texts:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 001 Contemporary German Society and Business Culture.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 002 Mathematical and Scientific German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/Kursseite.html

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 004 Mozart's Magic Flute.

    Instructor(s): Vanessa Helen Agnew

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Ever heard of the 'Mozart effect'? Taking this course will make you smarter and learning German easier! Besides covering topics such as, 'What is genius?' and 'Why is Mozart so famous?', you'll gain an in-depth knowledge of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte ). You'll improve your written and spoken German, do a comprehensive grammar review, compare productions of the opera and watch a number of films. You will also learn to sing the opera and perhaps take part in a concert at the end of the term. There will be guest lectures on subjects ranging from conducting, costume and lighting design to Freemasonry and Zoroastrianism. The assessment for this course will be based on participation, weekly writing and grammar assignments, and a midterm and final test. The only prerequisite for this course is enthusiasm. To see excerpts from a past Magic Flute concert, go to: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/gs-ug-mozart.html

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 005 Introduction to German Film.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (20-30 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 006.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 305. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic and, therefore, the course will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests. Students will work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding/using varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in German-speaking communities. The materials for the course will come from German websites as well as various materials from the instructor. Course requirements are: energetic class participation, thorough preparation, e-mail in German with the instructor and fellow students, and oral presentations.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 310. Readings in German Culture.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 Two German cities: Munich and Stuttgart. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be elected for a total of four credits. May not be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 001 Berlin, Berlin.

    Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course takes its title from a 1987 exhibit in celebration of Berlin's 750th anniversary. Despite the long history of this city, it has been a quintessentially "modern" metropolis for most of the 20th century. In this course, we will study the transformations of Berlin's urban landscape by looking at the city's cultural representations. How do poetry, essays, novels and films map the city? How have the city's division and reunification affected the production of Berlin's cultural image? The readings from different historical periods will focus on changing representations of key sites such as the "Potsdamer Platz" or "The Wall." Class participants will make their own discoveries about Berlin's past and present culture to become informed Berlin visitors of the future. Class discussions, presentations, lectures, and essays aim to improve your knowledge of German culture and its language. Grammar reviews will be included on individual or group demand.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 002 German for Engineering I.

    Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will introduce students to German engineering discourse. It is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to prepare students for internships and jobs requiring some knowledge of technical German, and for study abroad in a technical field in a German-speaking country. We will read and discuss texts on "how things work," sections of textbooks on Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, and passages from more specialized engineering texts. We will devote several class sessions to exploring the website of the Deutsches Museum München , and will generally make extensive use of the web. The course will also include guest lectures by faculty from technical fields and by visitors from industry. Vocabulary building will be emphasized strongly; grammar will be reviewed as needed. There will be a lot of partner and small group work during class time, in order to maximize students' opportunities to practice speaking and to help each other master the material. Student tasks and the instructor's expectations will be based on the assumption that the majority of students will previously have had (no more than!) the equivalent of four terms of college German, and that students are open to and interested in the study of scientific and technical concepts, but the course has no specific scientific or technical prerequisites.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 003 The German Language through Space and Time.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this section of German 325 is to acquaint students with the discourse and methods of German dialectology and language history. We shall survey the historical development of German and its dialects from the beginnings to the present day, in the context of changing sociological, political, economic, and cultural environments. As we study the changes in vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar of German, we shall also examine illustrative texts from a variety of genres, translate the older ones into modern German, and compare their features with those of modern German.

    Toward the end of the course, we shall turn our attention to East and West, political Left and Right, generations, and genders, and how those divisions are reflected in language behavior. Class discussions will be based primarily on assigned readings in Stedje, Die deutsche Sprache gestern und heute, on the illustrative texts in the course pack, and on homework problems. Grammar will be reviewed as required. Students will present several oral reports in class and write approximately one short essay every second week. Active participation in class discussions is expected. The language of instruction, discussion, class presentations, and essays is German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 004 German Youth Cultures.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Love Parade, Fettes Brot, and Lodown: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear fast. They stress difference, creativity, and-above all-individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetic are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class. This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities and political orientations of youths within the 80s and 90s. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, publications), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this "deutsche Besonderheit der Mythos Jugend" (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, weekly essays, short grammar tests, motivated physical and oral presence.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 005 Freud.

    Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Sigmund Freud was one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century, redefining the way we think about our minds, our desires and afflictions, our families and societies, art, writing, talking, and dreaming. He was also a great stylist, and his texts are a treat to read. In this course, we will read some of his most important short essays as well as excerpts from his longer works in the original German. English translations will be assigned as supplemental reading. The course will be taught in German and English, with German being the predominant language of discussion. All written homework assignments will be in German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    GERMAN 350. Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business in German; the European Union and Germany's roll therein; trade; traffic and transportation, marketing, industry; money and banking; and ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material, newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams, a number of short reports, papers, and projects and a final exam. The language of instruction is German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will give credit to a student for the completion of an internship in a German-speaking country.

    Requirements for receiving credit are as follows:

    1. The student will complete an eight-week (minimum) internship in a German-speaking country before registering for these three credits.
    2. The student will then complete a report/paper of at least 20 typed pages in German on this experience.
      1. Part 1 of the paper will describe the location of the internship. It will include information on the geography, history, population, major industries, social structure, politics, and culture of the area.
      2. Part 2 of the paper will be a 2 3 page description of the company or organization where the internship was completed. This part will include the elements of a "company presentation": location, history, major changes and developments, industrial branch, products, present legal form, number of employees, yearly turn-over, recent developments.
      3. Part 3 of the paper will be the student's personal account of the internship experience. This part should start with a description of a typical day for the intern: work hours, the facilities, the department, typical duties and activities, superiors, support staff, and co-workers, technologies, special events. If applicable, the student will compare and contrast the working situation and work-relationships in the United States and the location of the internship, noting similarities and differences between the two. The student may also include a description of the housing, as well as pictures and descriptions of travels or other non-work related activities and other mementos of the internship.
      4. Finally, the student will include a copy of any written summary or recommendation provided by the company upon the completion of the internship, as well as copies of thank-you letters written by the student to the company/department and to the landlord.

    3. During the registered term, the student will also make a ten-minute presentation in German about the internship experience to Business German students and potential interns.

    No regular class meetings are scheduled.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 375 / SCAND 375 / MEMS 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Scandinavian 375.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 383. Learning to Read German Lyric Poetry.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    What better way to explore a foreign language and culture than to read its poetry? Poems are small texts, condensed and inventive texts that invite close readings.

    In this course, we will venture into the rich tradition of German poetry throughout the ages. We will discuss examples of medieval Minnesang, Baroque sonetts, modern nonsense poetry as well as delve into German Romantic poems (many of which have been set to music) and popular songs. Rather than aiming to be exhaustive, at the end of the course we will arrive at a typology of poetic texts.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 401 / HISTORY 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas and cultural movements will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

    No prerequisites. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a midterm exam, several short quiz and take-home assignments, and a final paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 403. Nineteenth-Century German and European Thought (LAC).

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 231, and concurrent enrollment in GERMAN 401. (1). (Excl).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 405. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will emulate a German-speaking environment that practices everyday, professional, and academic situations. Practicing the effective presentation of reports or the negotiation of disputes will offer ample space for integrating advanced clusters of cultural topics in German-speaking communities. The discussion of articles and shorter texts about current events in Germany will complement the creative reenactment of particular conversational situations. Discussions include verbal synopses of text plots and arguments. Short oral presentations and a final group project establish the formal course requirements.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

    Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 431. Business German: Management and Marketing.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 350 or 430. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course offers authentic information and terminology as they apply to professional practices in the fields of company structure, management, and marketing in the German-speaking world. Using authentic situations and materials, the students become acquainted with the forms, roles, and related organizations of German companies. This is then expanded with management and manager skills, marketing and advertising in German companies. The course includes the essential cross-cultural aspects of doing business in/with Germany. When possible guest speakers will be brought in to elaborate on topics being covered. The course will be interactive, and the language of instruction is German. The intended audience is the large (and growing) number of majors and minors seeking courses in Business German, as well as non-majors who undertake summer internships in German-speaking countries. The course will meet three hours per week in a discussion format.

    The course will havetwo major exams and a final exam, vocabulary quizzes, three required written reports of approximately five typed pages with brief oral presentations of findings, and one longer term report of at least 15 pages.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 Twenthieth Century German Architecture. Meets with Architecture 503.025.

    Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

    Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will explore the built environment of modern Germany through a series of key case studies focussing upon the interrelations of architecture, design, urbanism, and politics. Beginning with rapid German industrialization and urbanization at the end of the nineteenth century, we will consider the responses of the German Werkbund , Peter Behrens, and the Bauhaus to the new social and cultural realities of modern technology. The rich architectural legacy of the Weimar Republic, especially the Berlin projects of Mies van der Rohe, Bruno Taut, Erich Mendelsohn, and Hans Poelzig, will be explored in relation to the analyses of urban culture articulated by Walter Benjamin and Siegfried Kracauer. National Socialist architectural plans and spatial ideologies (Albert Speer, the concentration camp, the Autobahn ) will then be followed by a consideration of postwar urban reconstruction philosophies in the two Germanies. Modernism (Frei Otto, Gunter Behnisch) as the architectural legitimation of state power will be proposed as a defining feature of modern German identity. We will conclude with an analysis of recent architectural and urban developments in Berlin (the masterplan of Axel Schultes, Norman Foster's Reichstag , Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum, Peter Eisenman's Holocaust Memorial) in that context of that city's newly emerging role as national capital and global center. Lectures, discussions, readings, films. Course requirements include regular attendance and participation, midterm examination, oral report, and final research paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 457. Twentieth-Century German Fiction.

    Section 001 German Modernism and the Crisis of Vision.

    Instructor(s): Julia C Hell

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this advanced undergraduate course is twofold: 1) to improve students' language skills, in particular their reading and speaking skills; and 2) to familiarize ourselves with a core issue of German cultural life in the 20th century, the relationship between literature and vision, or visuality. The course rests on two assumptions; 1) literature reflects and establishes different ways of seeing; 2) we can link these different ways of seeing to changes within German society. To pursue this link between text, vision, and social transformation, we will read short literary texts (from the 1890s to the present, with particular emphasis on the 1910s, the immediate post-WWII era, and post-unification Germany); in addition, we will also read scholarly articles discssing questions such as "objective" versus "subjective" vision, voyeurism, or the disturbance of vision that characterizes many 20th century texts. We will read the literary texts in German, most of the scholarly texts in English.

    This course is designed with the active participation of students in mind. That means, for instance, that students will regularly be asked to present the assigned readings in class. There will be one take-home exam and one in-class exam; in addition, students will write a short paper at the end of the term on a topic of their choice Some of the writing will be in English, all in-class discussions in German. If you have any questions about the course, please contact me at: hell@umich.edu

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 465 / MEMS 475 / HISTORY 485. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Marriage is one of the most central institutions in human societies. Contrary to previous generations, however, today we are beginning to look upon marriage as an institution subject to historic change. In the union of husband and wife gender relations are defined, reenacted and, at the same time, constantly reconstructed. But how was the female sphere defined in the fifteenth century? Did the Reformation affect society's understanding of matrimony? What was married life like in a world where two out of four children were likely to die? Where, and when, do we encounter love-matches? We will explore marriage discourse and policies in a culturally well-defined context, Western Europe, especially the German-speaking countries between ca. 1350 and 1600. By examining the depiction of marriage in literature and art of the age we will come to a more complex understanding of what marriage was supposed to be and what it really meant. This course will be of interest to German, History, MARC, and Women's Studies concentrators. No German required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall Term of their senior year, preferably but not necessarily as early as Winter Term of their sophomore year. German 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

    Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall Term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

    Organizational Meeting: Thursday, September 5, 4:00 p.m., 3117 MLB

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 506. Seminar in the Structure of Modern German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 415. (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    We shall begin our study of the structure of German with an overview of German phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. While we shall consider various theoretical frameworks, it is not our goal to single out any one of those frameworks for special attention or elaboration; our primary focus will be on the data themselves. We shall then proceed to important current issues, such as the relative status of standard and non-standard varieties of German, the social and political ramifications of standard ideology, variation vs. constancy, the role of language in inclusion/exclusion, oral vs. written usage, and strategies of discourse and narration. English-German structural contrasts will be noted where appropriate, as well as some of the more general aspects of first and second language acquisition.

    The course is intended primarily for graduate students, but advanced undergraduates are welcome. Readings will be assigned from Anthony Fox, The Structure of German, and a course pack. In addition to the readings, students will have homework problems and will give a several mini-reports on topics of interest. Students may choose to write a term-paper or take a final examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 517 / LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Linguistics 517.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    German 531 is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings will be primarily in English; class discussion will be in German and English.

    This course is intended to provide the theoretical and practical foundations for the teaching of German as a foreign language in schools and colleges. The course will combine regular reading assignments with frequent class observations and the preparation of sample lessons in order to generate a fruitful interplay between theory and practice. There will also be a strong emphasis on introducing students to relevant instructional technology. Course requirements include regular reading assignments, regular class observations, several short presentations, quizzes, and a final project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    Graduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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