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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 7:49 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


HISTORY 110 / MEMS 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wintroub/

The first half of the European history survey course covers a sweeping period of over a millennium. The course is designed to expose students to general outlines and chronology of European history and to encourage critical, skeptical analytical thinking. To anchor our flying coverage of this long and varied time, we will focus on developments in culture (art, architecture, literature), social organization (family, community, gender relations), and in political organization and theory. Readings will include a textbook, primary sources, challenging interpretive essays. Lecture time will be punctuated by small-group discussions, and active participation is strongly encouraged. Slides will frequently accompany lectures.

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HISTORY 121 / ASIAN 121. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Elliott , James Lee

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/121/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the history of East Asia before 1800, with an emphasis on China but with reference to developments in Japan, Korea, and Inner Asia. It aims to provide an overview of the major trends shaping state and society in the pre-modern period, including demographic shifts, technological innovation, the growth of commercialism, the rise of Neo-Confucian orthodoxy, the spread of popular religions, and changing notions of identity. Two lectures and one discussion section each week.

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HISTORY 132 / AAPTIS 100 / ACABS 100 / HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

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HISTORY 151 / ASIAN 111. Indian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the civilizations of India, that is, the region of South Asia consisting of the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

We will concentrate on five topics through the ages, covering the period from the Harappan Civilizations to the present. These are:

  1. the state in South Asia;
  2. attitudes to the body, male and female;
  3. social hierarchies, especially class and caste;
  4. religions, sects and belief systems;
  5. the arts and the experience of everyday life.

The course is organized thematically and not chronologically. While dealing with each topic, we will look at at least the following time points in history to maintain a balanced overview of the history: Harappan civilizations; classical India; the Delhi Sultanate; the Mughal empire; the colonial period; and contemporary India.

Requirements for the course will be somewhat unconventional: a quiz on facts; a test in historical analysis; and extra-textual presentation; and a problem-solving exercise on contemporary India.

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HISTORY 152 / ASIAN 112. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chandler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/152/001.nsf

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions. It is the home of Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, Hindu and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world’s fastest growing regional economy.

History l52 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history, covering the earliest civilizations, the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, the Cold War era and the gradual development of an interdependent region.

Students are urged to read widely so as to form their own ideas. Assessment will be based on a mid-term examination, a book review, and a final examination and on class participation, (Note: the course satisfies the race and ethnicity requirement. It is also cross-listed as Asian Studies 112).

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HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are: the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

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HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/161/001.nsf

This course covers the period from Reconstruction (1877) to the Reagan Presidency (1980). We will cover the following topics: Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, Westward Expansion, Imperialism, Industrial Revolution, the Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam era. We will explore these periods through the lens of social and cultural history. We will focus on the themes of race relations, gender construction, and class formation. This is not a course that will focus deeply on diplomacy of wars.

Requirements will include: faithful section attendance, two small papers, midterm and a final exam. Reading load is moderate to heavy.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 001 – Women and Gender in Middle Eastern History.

Instructor(s): Shaun Lopez (slopez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Middle Eastern women have long been objects of fascination for the Western world. From Euopean travelers' accounts dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to contemporary news coverage, film literature and art, representations of these women as mysterious and sexual, yet oppressed and marginal, have been both pervasive and powerful. Today, media images of the region's women and reports of their oppression call on or support notions about the Middle East already present in Western popular culture. More recently, the oppression of Afghani women has, for many, come to represent the experiences of women throughout the Arab and Islamic Middle East as a whole, engendering debate on the very nature of the region and its people. In this course students will explore the historical experiences of women in a variety of Middle Eastern contexts. The goal is to demonstrate the richness, diversity, and centrality of women's experiences throughout the region's history. Focusing primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, we will examine the ways in which women have been understood and represented in a variety of materials. These include secondary literature about the history of women in the Middle East, as well as a variety of primary sources, including newspapers, film, art, literature, memoirs, autobiographies, and court records.

The second major purpose of the course is to help students develop their writing skills, specifically within the discipline of History. First, it will introduce students to the ways in which historians have written about women and gender in Middle Eastern history. Second, it seeks to aid students in making the difficult but important transition from reading history to writing history. Students will become familiar with a variety of primary sources utilized by historians, and consider how to read and analyze those sources for the purposes of historical inquiry. Finally, this course seeks to develop the abilities of students to write history. To that end, students will be given assignments of varying form and lenth throughout the semester in order to develop important skills needed to write an original and effective essay.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 002 – Riots, Revolts, and Insurrections in Early American History.

Instructor(s): Ellen Hartigan O'Connor (eoconnor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Riots and revolts dramatically illuminate the tensions and fears of the societies they disrupt. Some actions spring from conservative community impulses; others allow the politically powerless to command the attention and reaction of those who hold power. This course will explore the motives and meanings of riots and revolts in eighteenth and nineteenth-century North America, including Revolutionary mobs, slave insurrections and antislavery violence, and urban riots. The American Revolution and its legacy for collective action and rebellion will be a repeating theme, helping us to draw together the activities of these enslaved African-Americans, disgruntled urban workers, and debt-ridden farmers. Using a variety of primary accounts and current historical research, the class will investigate the causes of revolt and the role of rebellion in political and social change. We will also analyze how stories of riot and rebellion are shaped and appropriated as their histories are written. Through short weekly papers and two longer reserach projects, students will learn to evaluate evidence, make convincing arguments, and assist their peers in revising their writing.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 003 – Global Youth Cultures in Africa and Its Diasporas, 1945-2000.

Instructor(s): Andrew Ivaska (aivaska@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From South African 'cowboy gangs' to Nigerian pulp fiction and French hip-hop, this writing seminar explores the 20th century histories of 'global' youth cultures on the African continent and its varied diasporas. As we study the ways in which young people used elements of globally circulating popular culture to fashion new cultures of dress, music, writing, cinema viewing, resistance and war, we will seek to situate these processes in specific historical and political contexts. How have images and icons originating in the global mass culture industries been appropriated in Africa? What are the politics of these appropriations in relation to social struggles around gender, class, ethnicity, generation and sexuality? How do cultural forms 'travel,' and how do they change over time and space? How might we develop new, critical and historical understandings of concepts like 'globalization,' 'diaspora' and 'youth'? As we consider these and other questions, we will also work to develop skills in reading, analyzing and constructing histories using a broad range of sources - both primary and secondary, unconventional as well as more familiar.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 004 – Self Made in America: Autobiography and Self-Narrative in Early American History.

Instructor(s): Anna Lawrence (amlaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Self Made in America will explore early American history, from European settlement to the Civil War, through the lens of self-narrative. In this course, we are reading the words of historical actors as they sought to make sense of their lives and times in their autobiographies. The diverse themes explored in this course encompass slavery, transatlantic travel, religion, patriotism, class and gender. While providing a fascinating view of early American history, this material will also allow you to reflect on why writers used certain conventions, the methods that these authors used in order to convey particular messages, and the way that your own writing can effectively convey arguments. Some of the central questions considered will include: How did people present their lives in different historical periods? What do these modes of representation reveal about their situation, their location, and their concerns? Our examination of autobiographical sources will cover a wide range of sources: early Puritan and Native American writings, eighteenth-century evangelical and travel narratives, writings of political figures, and African-American autobiographies.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 006 – Modern China's Histories: Reading, Writing, and Interrogating History.

Instructor(s): Rob Gray

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will use a wide range of historical "texts" (written and audio-visual) on modern historical texts. By comparing how different commentators write about the Chinese past and present, students will learn to identify some of the major biases and rifts – political, academic, ethnic, economic, etc. – that influence how different people at different times have diversely viewed one country's past. By exploring Chinese history through the interrogation of materials from various sources around the world, students will be encouraged to view received knowlege about China and Asia as knowlege purposefully contructed by invested actors within a global system of competing knowledge centers, including their own university. In addition to secondary historical texts, students will read widely from the broad range of primary texts on modern China recently made available through translations into English: texts written by government officials and exiled dissidents, urban rich and rural poor, Han Chinese in the capital and Muslim Chinese on the border.

In addition to learning about Chinese history, students will be encouraged to apply the critial reading and writing skills learned in this class in how they engage with texts and sources outside of the class. With this larger goal in mind, regular reading and writing assignments will impart students with some of the basic reading and writing tools necessary to become active and independent thinkers. Thus, the course is designed to use the topic of Chinese history as a vehicle to provide students with the reading, writing, and thinking skills necessary to succeed in their further studies and, more importantly, to become independent and critically thinking citizens in the "information age."

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 – U.S. Environmental History. Meets with American Culture 102.002.

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria (pdeloria@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/196/001.nsf

A relatively new historical field, environmental history tells stories about the past that focus on "nature" – both as a cultural concept and as a set of biological processes and systems. This course will explore the ways in which these different "natures" have acted as both agents and objects of historical change. It is not a course on environmental ethics or policy, although students should expect to encounter both during the academic term. The course will deal primarily with the American past as seen through the lens of the natural world and our imaginings and perceptions of it. In that sense, the course is an accounting of a long, complicated conversation between humans and the earth.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 – Postwar Black Expatriate Writing.

Instructor(s): Kevin K Gaines (gaineskk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine a selection of works of fiction and nonfiction by writers of African descent who found expatriation or chosen exile from their countries of origin enabling to their critical interrogation of the condition of U.S. Blacks and African peoples. We will be concerned, as well,with these writers' analyses of the legacies of mass movements for black liberation. Among the authors we will consider are James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Jan Carew, Maryse Conde, and Chester Himes.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 – Epidemics in American History. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Howard Markel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will study the social, medical, and cultural history of several major epidemics in American history from cholera to AIDS. Each week is an in-depth discussion of readings of historical studies and novels and plays about contagion. Weekly journal writing assignments, a term paper based on original research, and class participation constitute the final grade. All who take this course must be prepared to learn, read, think, and write a lot.

Required readings are as follows.

  • The Plague (Vintage/Random House Books) by Albert Camus
  • An Enemy of the People (Oxford Classics) by Henrik Ibsen
  • The Cholera Years University of Chicago Press) by Charles E. Rosenberg
  • Arrowsmith (Signet) by Sinclair Lewis
  • How the Other Half Lives (Penguin) by Jacob Riis
  • Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892 (Johns Hopkins University Press) by Howard Markel
  • And the Band Played On (St. Martin's Press) by Randy Shilts
  • The Hot Zone (Bantam) by Richard Preston
  • Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public's Health (Beacon) by Judith W. Leavitt
  • A Summer Plague (Yale University Press) by Tony Gould.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 004 – Women's History/Women's Words. Meets with American Culture 102.001 and Women's Studies 151.002.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will be run as a colloquium and will explore the history of the United States as seen from women's perspectives. We will read first hand commentaries by women from the early colonial period through to the present. These commentaries will range from Indian Captivity and slave narratives, to the correspondences of presidential wives (Abigail Adams, Eleanor Roosevelt) and plantation mistresses, to autobiographies to novels by such luminaries of American literature as Toni Morrison, Edith Wharton, and Willa Cather. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences, exploring both the world of Native Americans and Latinas, leisured ladies, college students, slaves and immigrant women, straight and gay women. Sexuality, child birth, marriage and alternatives to marriage, rights to full citizenship, to education and employment, all will play central roles in this course as will the ways women were flought to authorize themselves as writers and political figures. Readings will include such books as Toni Morrison's Beloved, Audre Lorde's Zami, Adrienne Rich's erotic poetry, Edith Wharton's House of Mirth, Mary Rowlandson's Indian captivity narrative and native writer Louise Erdich's Beet Queen, Harriet Jacob's Narrative of a Slave Girl.

The writing requirement for the course will consist of weekly response papers, due before the beginning of each class.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 005 – Caribbean and its Diaspora. Meets with American Culture 102.003.

Instructor(s): Hoffnung-Garskof

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 200. Greece to 201 B.C.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Homer, Aristotle and Socrates, Odysseus, Pericles and Alexander the Great, Medea, Cassandra and Antigone, Athens, Sparta and Troy...names and places that pop up in many different contexts. Wouldn't it be great to know who and what they really were and why these names and places still carry meaning today? This survey course introduces participants to ancient Greece from the Mycenaean age to the end of the Hellenistic period. It covers ancient works of literature as well as inscriptions, papyri, coins, and archaeological evidence. Lectures and the section discussions focus on the development of Greek society, the role of the individual in Greek history and the dynamics of historical change. Throughout the term, corresponding and contrasting issues relevant to our own society and history will be addressed. There will be two exams. Each will include essay questions and also test knowledge of historical figures, places and events (2 x 30% of the grade). 20% of the grade will be based on contributions to discussions in sections, the remaining 20% on assignments and quizzes in sections. History 200 is the "prequel" to History 201 (The Roman Empire and Its Legacy). Textbook: R. Morkot, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece (1996). NO PREREQUISITES. EVERYBODY WELCOME.

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HISTORY 210 / MEMS 210. Early Middle Ages, 300-1100.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course covers the period when the first true 'Europe' was born. It covers the disintergration of the Roman Empire in the western Mediterranean, and the development of successor states in northwestern Europe, like the 'barbarian' monarchies, and the multiethnic empires of Charlemagne and the Ottonians up to 1000. Main themes are the development of new kinds of community among European people (Christian monasticism, feudalism, ethnic solidarity), new economic systems, and relations with the earliest Islamic states and with the Byzantine empire.

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HISTORY 212 / MEMS 212. The Renaissance.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – Meets with Institute for the Humanities 211.001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/212/001.nsf

Boccaccio and Botticelli, Michelangelo and Machiavelli: why are the names of these authors and artists househould words five hundred years later? What social and economic conditions led to the production of the culture we know as the "Renaissance"? This course is an introduction to social, intellectual, political, religious and artistic developments of the era 1350-1600. Our attention will focus on the building of the Italian city-states and principalities, with attention to the influences of Byzantine, Arabic, Jewish and northern European culture. Two weekly lectures, often with slides, are integrated with weekly section discussion of texts from the period.

Requirements include paricipation in section, two short papers on primary sources, and two tests.
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HISTORY 220. Survey of British History to 1688.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this course, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

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HISTORY 241. War in the Twentieth Century Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/war/war.htm

This course focuses upon 20th Century Middle Eastern Wars, especially those in which the United States or other Western Powers have been involved. It considers the impact on the region of WWI and WWII. It then treats the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli Wars, the Lebanese Civil War, the Gulf Wars, the Soviet adventure in Afghanistan, and America's War on Terror in Afghanistan and elswhere. Attention is paid to military, political and social history. It is argued that war has powerfully shaped the boundaries and political practices of the modern Middle East. Grading is based on a midterm, a final, and participation in class discussion sections.

Texts:

  • Peter L. Bergen, Holy War, Inc.: Inside the Secret World of Osama Bin Laden. (Free Press, 2002).
  • David Fromkin, A Peace to End All Peace (Avon, 1989).
  • Larry Goodson. Afghanistan's Endless War. (U of Washington Press, 2001).
  • Michael Gordon and Bernard Trainor. The General's War. (Little, Brown, 1998.)
  • Steven Heydemann, ed., War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (University of California Press, 2000).
  • Ghassan Kanafani, Men in the Sun (Three Continents Press, 1998).
  • T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom (Anchor, 1991)
  • Yitzhak Rabin, The Rabin Memoirs (University of California Press, 1996)
  • Mark Tessler, A History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict (Bloomington: Indiana Univ. Press, 1994).

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HISTORY 246(446) / CAAS 246. Africa to 1850.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the pre-colonial African past, from the early prehistory of the human to the eve of Europe's second great wave of empire when Africans across most of the continent became the subjects of European colonies. The second European empires (from roughly the 1870s through the 1960s) have had profound influence on Africa, yet important global forces were affecting Africa long before the mid-nineteenth century. Moreover, the shapes that Africa would take under the influence of European empire would be strongly conditioned by the course of change on the continent before 1850 and by the nature of society and culture on the continent stretching back for more than a millennium.

The major objective of this course is to establish a deeper understanding of the forces, institutions, and processes that underlay the experiences of Africans and the African continent before 1850. The post-1850 history of Africa will be taken up by Professor Diouf during the second term, in History 247.

Over the past five decades, the reconstruction of the African past – from archaeological evidence, from oral testimonies, and from historical linguistics and from other methods and materials – has been one of the most remarkable departures in the historical sciences, taking the professional craft of history beyond its signature: the written document. Of course, the peoples of Africa long enjoyed a rich knowledge of their past and a deep engagement with history, well before the emergence of the professional practice of history on the continent. And a critical factor in the shaping of Africa's futures has been the production and control of histories for and about the continent.

Albeit the breakthroughs in the reconstruction of Africa's past, and albeit the importance of historical knowledge to Africans, Africa is substantially "known" today – by those outside Africa, by the international press, by the aid and development and the human rights communities – through a shallow and relatively presentist understanding, partially based on direct observation, partially based on persistent and pervading myths and fantasies about Africa, myths that have their own significant histories. The course will encourage a more complex understanding of Africa and a sense of African history as a work-in-progress.

The course will explore:

  • Africa's earliest history
  • The histories and fates of pre-colonial empires, kingdoms, and states across the continent
  • The shapes of African culture and society
  • The Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on Africa
  • The rise of Islam in Africa
  • The relations of Europe and Africa before the second European empires
  • Basic conditions of life in pre-colonial Africa
  • African modernities before "modernity"

Among the main questions, the recurrent questions:

  • Africa's Past: How has it come to be known, understood, comprehended, explained?
  • Africa's Cultures: The utility of models of continuity and change?
  • Africa's Civilizations: The ethics of autocracy and domination?
  • Africa's Connections to the Wider World: Determined or negotiated?
  • Africa's Economies: The fates of value and equity in extractive economies?
  • Africa's Resources: Whose materials, to what use, to what effect?

The course will be organized around lectures, readings, discussions, the viewing of several films from Africa.

Course requirements:

  1. Participation in class discussion. 15%.
  2. A critical book review of a monograph from the "recommended list" – three to four pages. 25%.
  3. Midterm exam. 25%.
  4. Final exam constructed, in essay form, around the "recurrent questions" above. 35%.

Reading List:

  • Boubacar Barry, Senegambia and the Atlantic Trade Slave, Cambridge University Press, 1998
  • Maryse Conde, Segu, London, Penguin Books
  • John K. Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Makings of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800, (2nd edition), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998 and
  • The Kongolese Saint Anthony. Dona Beatriz Kimpa and The Antonian 1684-1706 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999
  • Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, New York, Saint Martin's Press (Revised Edition), 1995.

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HISTORY 250. China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of a survey of early Chinese history, with special emphasis on the origins and development of the political, social, and economic institutions and their intellectual foundations. Special features include class participation in performing a series of short dramas recreating critical issues and moments in Chinese history, slides especially prepared for the lectures, new views on race and gender in the making of China, intellectual and scientific revolutions in the seventeenth century, and literature and society in premodern China.

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HISTORY 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu), Margaret L Steneck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist265/

The University of Michigan has been a leader in shaping the modern American university. This course examines the University's history from the perspective of students, faculty, fields of study, administration, and alumni. It will also explore the factors that have shaped the University and place it within its larger social, political, national, and international contexts. The primary prerequisite is an interest in your University and its place in history.

Lectures are accompanied by extensive slide presentations and a few movies. Readings include a course pack and textbook. Grading is based on essay/ objective exams; two short papers or a term project; and a campus tour photo quiz to acquaint students with central campus, its architecture and embellishments. Two of the five discussion sections (taught by the course instructors) are limited to upper-class enrollment only and will encourage UM-related projects.

Books, available at the bookstores; some used copies may be available:
Ruth Bordin, Women at Michigan: The "Dangerous Experiment," 1870s to the Present. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 1999.
Jerry Harju, The Class of '57. Marquette, MI: Lake Superior Press, 1997.
Howard Peckham, The Making of the University of Michigan, edited and updated by Margaret L. and Nicholas H. Steneck. Ann Arbor, MI: Bentley Historical Library, 1994.

Coursepacks, available at Ulrich's Bookstore:
M.L. & N.H. Steneck, Campus Practicum, 2001 Edition. (Available after February 19)
History 265 Coursepack. Winter 2001 edition.

*Two copies of Peckham, Bordin, Harju and the Campus Practicum are on UGLI reserve.

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HISTORY 266. Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars – real and imagined – have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

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HISTORY 275 / CAAS 231. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 231.001.

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HISTORY 285. Science, Technology, and Society: 1940 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist285/

The enterprise of science changed dramatically after WWII, both intellectually and socially. The consequences of being able to split the atom and, more recently, to engineer biological blueprints have made science literally a life and death activity that touches every human. This course will explore the growth and implications of scientific and technological development from the end of WWII to the present. There will be two lectures and one discussion per week. Students will work in small groups on one problem during the term, e.g., energy, pollution, global warming, health care issues. Each group will hand in a jointly written report at the end of term and present a class report. Three or four books will be assigned reading. Students will be expected to make use of e-mail and conferencing.

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HISTORY 301. Discovery of the Universe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did we get here? What's going on? Where are we going with this? These questions define the physical sciences, and this course examines the history of the ways and means, human, observational, experimental, and theoretical, that astronomers and physicists have used to answer them. The course begins with what has been called the "Scientific Revolution," with Galileo and the Inquisition, but quite rapidly we come to the nineteenth century, and the heart of the course is on the development of our study of the universe, its origin, structure, and future, during the last few generations. Among topics we shall consider are the financing of science, the politics and security implications of modern research, history of computers, the roles of women, the geographical and cultural spread of research, popularization and demonization of science, pseudo-science, and the various contexts of science, in addition to the development of research and thought. So this is a history, and not a science, course, although many of the readings will come from scientists themselves, and our discussions will be centered on the human history rather than on the science itself.

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HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 001 – The Atlantic Slave Trade.

Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 002 – History of the Pacific. Meets with American Culture 301.005.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The idea of the 'South Seas' is one that filters through American culture, from sources as different as Moby Dick, the annexation of Hawaii, and 'Survivor: the Marquesas'. Commonly, this engagement with the Pacific Islands is neither informed nor critical. This introductory course will aim to equip students with a foundational historical knowledge and enable them to think more critically about this area, with greater awareness and independence.

The focus here will be on the period of approximately 1769-1939 in the oceanic Pacific, a region which for course purposes will range roughly from Guam to Hawai'i, and from there as far afield as Easter Island and New Zealand. Some emphasis will be given to American territories in the Pacific, but all major island groups will be considered, including Samoa, Tonga, Fiji, Marshall Islands and French Polynesia.

The purpose of the course is to give students a wider sense of developments in the island Pacific. Larger thematic issues will be addressed, such as indigenous systems of navigation and exchange, island cultures, imperialism, religion, commerce, island politics and ecology. There will also be more detailed explorations and case studies, for instance, of American militarization in the Pacific, the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, and the scientific exploration of the Pacific. Different kinds of historical practice and writing will be used and discussed, including indigenous oral and written histories, colonial histories, anthropology, music and film. Not only is the Pacific the largest region on earth, covering nearly a third of the world's surface, it is in itself of enormous interest, as students will find.

No prior knowledge or study of the region is necessary.

Assessment will be through two short in-class tests, two 7-10 page papers, participation in class discussion, and a final take home exam. Class attendance is compulsory, and repeated unexplained and unexcused absences will lead to grade reductions.

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HISTORY 307 / ACABS 322 / RELIGION 359. History and Religion of Ancient Judaism.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May be elected independently of HISTORY 306. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 322.001.

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HISTORY 310 / RCSSCI 310. Globalization in History: the Making of the Modern World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu), Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomores and above. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 310.001.

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HISTORY 318. Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Megan Koreman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Europe spent the first half of the twentieth century convulsed in the violence of war and revolution. The First World War hadn't even ended before the Bolshevik Revolution and its civil war began, followed by the street fighting between Fascists and Communists popular in the '20s and '30s, then the Spanish Civil War, the state violence of Nazism and Stalinism, and then the catastrophe of the Second World War. How and why did Europe descend into such violence? What role did technology play in it? How did ideology contribute? How did ordinary men and women make sense of it all, let alone survive it?

We will explore the ideological, political, economic, social and cultural forces that collided in this turbulent era with particular attention to how World Wars I and II affected everyday life, Nazism, and the Bolshevik Revolution and Stalinism.

Grades will be based on one paper, a mid-term, a final and participation in discussion sections.

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HISTORY 321. Britain Since 1945.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – Post World War II Britain.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 221 is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine Britain from World War II through he Cold War, the social and political challenges of the 1960s, the Conservative resurgence of the late 1970s, the Falklands war, and the fall of Margaret Thatcher, to the 1997 electron. Special attention will be paid to the experience of war by civilian populations; the development of a "welfare state" and subsequent challenges thereto; Britain's decline as a world power; protest movements; the nuclear disarmament and peace movements from the late 50s/early 60s through the 80s; the influence of American culture on Britain; decolonization and the participation of Asians and Africans in British culture and politics; Welsh and Scottish nationalism; the Northern Ireland question; and on-going political and cultural debates about class, education, the media, sexuality and gender roles, and Britain as a multi-cultural society.

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HISTORY 332 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / POLSCI 395 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 337 / CAAS 337 / WOMENSTD 337. Black Women in the United States, Part I: From the American Revolution through the Women's Era.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/337/001.nsf

See CAAS 337.001.

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HISTORY 347(476) / ANTHRCUL 346. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – Meets with History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/347/001.nsf

This course will examine the colonial period in Latin American history from the initial Spanish and Portuguese contact and conquest to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. It will focuses on the interaction between Indians and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of colonial societies in the New World, and examining the indigenous background conquest as well as the nature of the settler community. We look at the shifting uses of land and labor,and the development of urban life. We use court recoreds, Inquisition documents, and poetry to try to understand daily life for men and women, and the structures of honor and belief that shaped their worlds.

Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final.

Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources.

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HISTORY 350 / GTBOOKS 350 / AMCULT 360. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

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HISTORY 361. U.S. Intellectual History, 1750-1940.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jscarson/Hist361.html

America, one historian has remarked, is a nation of words. In this lecture course we will examine some of the words and concepts that have been central within American culture from the Enlightenment to World War II and how they have been articulated, debated, instantiated, and used at a variety of times and by a variety of people. Our approach, derived from the cultural history of ideas, will examine not just the world of thinking, but how those thoughts get translated into doing and making, and in the process are themselves transformed.

Our reading will include such major figures as Thomas Jefferson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William James, and Langston Hughes, as well as a host of less well known writers, scientists, political thinkers, popular commentators and the like. We will focus throughout, however, as much on how the words are used – in producing arguments, laws, social movements, consumer goods, and machines – and on the technologies that make them available, as on the language itself.

Required readings include the following:

  • Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward, (New York: Dover, 1997); ISBN 0486290387
  • W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, (New York: Dover, 1994); ISBN 0486280411
  • Eric Foner, The Story of American Freedom, (New York: Norton, 1998); ISBN 0393319628
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland, (New York: Dover, 1998); ISBN 0486404293
  • David Hollinger and Charles Capper, The American Intellectual Tradition, 4th ed., vols. 1-2 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001); ISBN 0195137205 (vol. 1); 0195137221 (vol.2)
  • Daniel T. Rodgers, Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics Since Independence, (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997); ISBN 0674167112
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin, (New York: Bantam Books, 1981); ISBN 0553212184
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor, The Principles of Scientific Management, (New York: Dover, 1998); ISBN 0486299880
  • Henry David Thoreau, Walden, (New York: Dover, 1995); ISBN 0486284956
  • Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (NY: Random House, 2000); ISBN 0553214640.

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HISTORY 364. Culture and Politics of American Suburbia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D. Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In post-1945 U.S. history, suburbia has emerged as the dominant method of social organization, the primary focus of land-use planning, and the center of political power. Critics have blamed American suburbs for the crisis of the cities, the alienation of youth generations, the explosion of sprawl, and pervasive patterns of racial and class segregation. Defenders have praised the suburbs for the safety of their neighborhoods, the quality of their schools, and the broad expansion of the middle-class American Dream of a detached, single-family home. This course will grapple with the dominant themes and legacies of American suburbia through a focus on popular culture imagery; social and political history; race, class, gender, and generational analysis; and spatial/developmental policy. Did the same forces that produced the sprawling suburbs also create the urban crisis? How does a metropolitan approach to modern American history recast discussions about the rise and fall of the New Deal Order, the power shift from Rustbelt to Sunbelt, the changing ideologies of class and race, the politics of family and community, and the relationship between local and national policy? How can the increasing diversity and dynamism of American suburbs be reconciled with the pervasive stereotypes of architectural blandness and cultural conformity? What does it mean to say that the United States has become a Suburban Nation?

Lecture themes and discussion topics will range from Levittown to Columbine, from the Feminine Mystique to middle-class Black suburbs, from the Silent Majority to the anti-sprawl movement. The course will begin by confronting the dominant discourses of suburbia in American politics and popular culture, and throughout we will focus extensively on films, novels, and other mass media sources as key shapers of suburban identity. Close attention will be paid to the periodic battles over inclusion and exclusion in suburban communities, including political conflicts over school integration, housing desegregation, and taxation. Throughout the term, we will examine the changing meaning of the suburban label, as middle-class bedroom communities have evolved into autonomous horizontal cities no longer dependent on the urban core. Students are expected to attend lectures and discussion sections, to watch assigned films/documentaries, and to consult the course webpage for the electronic coursepack and graded assignments. The list below contains likely assigned books, but is subject to change.

*NOTE* This course will become History 364 with discussion sections and will be 4 credits. Registering into this course as History 393 quarantees you a place in history 364 once it is established.

Required Readings:
-Kenneth Jackson, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of America
-Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road
-Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right
-David L. Kirp, Our Town: Race, Housing, and the Soul of Suburbia
-James Howard Kunstler, The Geography of Nowhere
-Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles
-Sarah Grace McCandless, Grosse Pointe Girl
-Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Andres Duany, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

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HISTORY 367 / AMCULT 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): GREGORY E DOWD

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 367.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 368 / AMCULT 342 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

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HISTORY 379 / RCSSCI 379. History of Computers and Networks.

Section 002 – Meets with SI 528.002.

Instructor(s): Paul N Edwards (pne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Familiarity with computer concepts helpful but not required. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rcssci/379/002.nsf

This non-technical course covers the development and use of computers from the ancient world to the present. We will discuss automatic calculation from the abacus to the integrated circuit; logic machines from Boole to neural networks; and the evolution of programming languages from assemblers to Ada. Our primary focus will be the social, political, and cultural contexts of post-1939 digital computers and computer networks. We will explore such topics as how early computers cracked the Nazi Enigma cipher during World War II; how the Cold War changed computer research (and how computers changed the Cold War); why digital computing replaced well-developed analog methods in the 1940s and 1950s; computing in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the developing world; how hackers helped shape minicomputers and the Internet; how amateur hobbyists invented the personal computer; and the story behind the World Wide Web.

The course assumes that new technologies and their social effects evolve together along a variety of dimensions. Some of these are technical: innovation, design, and opportunity. Some are social: funding sources, societal values, and organizational structures. Yet others are macro-scale economic, political, and social forces. The major questions that motivate our study of computers will concern "why" issues. Why were computers invented? Who wanted them, and for what purposes? How have computers changed the shape of society and culture – and how did society and culture shape them? The course is relevant to anyone interested in the history, politics, and culture of technology. Several films will be screened, and the class will take at least one "field trip" to a historical site.

Course assignments include a research paper, group projects, and a midterm exam. Prerequisites: none. Familiarity with basic computer concepts is helpful, but not assumed.

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HISTORY 381 / MEMS 381. History of the Jews from the Muslim Conquests to the Spanish Expulsion.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nina Caputo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey major historic developments in medieval Jewish society under both Islam and western Christendom. Broadly, the course will look at the divergence of Judaism and Christianity, the rise of the Babylonian geonim, the social and cultural history of Jews in the Arab Mediterranean world, the emergence of Jewish communities in Medieval Ashkenaz, and the impact on Jewish society of the Crusades, the Reconquista, the emergence of the mendicant orders, and the Black Death. The course will examine the interaction of Jews with the majority culture, political structure, and economy, as well as changing cultural trends within Jewish society. The distinctive religious climate of the medieval period will serve as a unifying theme throughout. We will study primary sources as well as recent historical scholarship, and our focus will include the history of women as well as that of men. Class is conducted as lecture and discussion of texts with an occasional film or slide lecture. Requirements for the course: several short written and oral assignments, tests, and final examination. Prerequisites: None. History 110 and some familiarity with Judaism or Jewish civilization (Religion 201, Judaic Studies 379/HJCS 379, or similar) is recommended background.

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HISTORY 383. Modern Jewish History to 1880.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mitchell Hart

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the Jews respond to the revolutionary transformations that occurred in Europe beginning in the seventeenth century? How did the emergence of the modern nation-state, notions of individual rights and duties, secularism, liberalism, socialism and other political ideologies impact on the condition of the Jews? What were the effects of industrialization, capitalism, urbanization? This course introduces students to the major themes and issues in modern Jewish history. It begins with a consideration of what is meant by "Jewishmodernity." It then examines the nature of pre-modern, traditional Jewish communities, and the factors involoved in the incipient breakdown of this traditional structure, a process that began in the 17th century. After this, we will consider, among other topics, the Jewish enlightenment or Haskalah; emancipation and assimilation in their various national contexts; the rise of Reform Judaism and neo-Orthodoxy; and the emergence of modern Jewish Studies. The course is intended as an introduction; no prior knowledge of Judaism or Jewish History is required.

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HISTORY 386. The Holocaust.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will attempt to answer some of the most vexing historical problems surrounding the Nazi regime's systematic extermination of six million Jews during World War II. For example: What role did Christian hostility to Judaism play in the growth of genocidal racism in Germany? How did German political traditions prepare the way for Nazi authoritarianism? Why did the German people acquiesce in the Nazi program of mass murder? Why did the American and British governments refuse to come to the aid of European Jews? How did European Jews behave in crisis and extremity? Was the Holocaust "unique"? There will be a midterm, a paper of 10 to 15 pages, and a comprehensive final.

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HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 – Family, Friendship, and Love in Chinese Culture.

Instructor(s): James Lee

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a closer look at the nature of human relations in China. The purpose of the class is twofold: first, to introduce a number of selected texts on family, friendship, and love in Chinese culture; second, to provide a broad conceptual framework on self and society in traditional and contemporary China. Classes are organized around specific themes. Readings include anthropological, historical, and literary texts.

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HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – New York Modern: Great Metropolis. Meets with American Culture 301.002.

Instructor(s): James W Cook Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee may be required. May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A sweeping historical examination of the diverse cultural life of New York City, from its emergence as a modern "metropolis" during the 1830s through late 20th century cultural developments such as hip hop and punk. Along the way we will consider a wide range of New York experiences (white, Black, Asian American, Latino/a, gay/lesbian) and cultural forms (street performance, theater, museaums, urban literature, dance, music, film, shopping, etc.)

This course, in short, provides both a broad survey of the varieties of American cultural modernism, as well as a more focused exploration of the spaces, neighborhoods, institutions, and historical circumstances that make the New York City the cultural capitol of the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 394. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 – Saints & Society in Premod Europe.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This colloquium will examine the concept of holiness and the institution of sainthood from the first centuries of Christian proselytization in the Mediterranean world at the time of the Roman Empire until the Christian missions to the New World in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Particular focuses of the course will be the ways in which saints in life and in death-interacted with the communities that venerated them; the power involved in canonization and why candidates for sainthood succeeded and others failed; the ways in which saintly images became established in the West; and why, finally, Protestant sects mounted an attack on the saints. The readings for the course will be drawn largely from primary sources: particularly hagiographies (saints' lives) and miracle stories. The written assignments build toward a final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 – SupernaturalTales/EModEur&Amer. MEETS WITH HISTORY 396.003.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The sections of History 396.002 & 396.003, which will meet together, explore the porous boundary between the natural and the supernatural worlds in early modern religious culture. Our readings will cover Europe, including Russia, and colonial British North America from 1500 to 1850, and will survey a wide range of topics: the battle between magic and faith in the Reformation and Counter-Reformation; Protestant attempts to relocate spiritual encounters in the personal rather than the external world; the critical role of spiritual intermediaries such as saints, prophets, visionaries, cunning folk, and mystics in navigating the boundary between the natural and the supernatural; the changing image of the devil and other evil spirits; witchcraft and the black arts; the cross-cultural phenomenon of spirit possession; the rise of evangelical religion as the repository of supernatural practices; apocalyptic and millennial visions; and the proliferation of various sects and alternative religious communities in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Students will read both primary and secondary sources, and be expected to produce a 12-15 page paper based on original research by the end of the term. Several short (2-4 page) papers will be assigned during the term as well. The two sections will be run in tandem on a flexible basis. Some times we will meet together and discuss joint readings, some times we will meet separately for small group discussions. This is a unique opportunity to work with professors with very different expertise and to think comparatively about some of the most exciting issues in early modern religious history.

Books to be read include:
Keith Thomas, RELIGION AND THE DECLINE OF MAGIC;
David Sabean, THE POWER AND THE BLOOD;
David Hall, WORLDS OF WONDER, DAYS OF JUDGMENT;
Paul Johnson and Sean Wilentz, THE KINGDOM OF MATTHIAS.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 – SupernaturalTales/EModEur&Amer. MEETS WITH HISTORY 396.002

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 396.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 – African Americans & the Politics of Culture – Expatriates and Cultural Ambassadors: African Americans Abroad During the Cold War. Meets with CAAS 394.001.

Instructor(s): Penny M Von Eschen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will explore the global presence and significance of Black writers, musicians, artists, and athletes in an era – 1945-1975 – when the contridictions of American racism and the country's aspirations as leader of the free world facilitated the projection of the optimism and vitality of African American culture world-wide. We will explore the writings, performances, and productions of both expatriates and cultural ambassadors and consider the ways in which their activities redefined images of American nationhood and African American opposition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 – Fascism. ENROLLMENT LIMITED TO JUNIOR & SENIOR HISTORY CONCENTRATORS BY PERMISSION ONLY.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Between the two world wars, many European countries – most notably Italy and Germany – saw the emergence of authoritarian and charismatic forms of government. Although there were significant differences between these regimes, many still refer to them as 'fascist' or 'para-fascist.' Is fascism a useful historical category, and can comparative analysis help us understand the nature of these regimes and the causes of their success and eventual failure? Were these regimes "modern" or reactionary? What is the relationship between fascism, nationalism, and racism? This course will address these questions by exploring first the two principal examples, Italian Fascism and German Nazism, as political, social, and cultural systems. We'll then extend our analysis to other authoritarian regimes, including Franco's Spain and Salazar's Portugal. Finally, we will examine the politics of neo-Fascism in the post-WWII period.

Teaching Method and Evaluation – This course will be taught as a seminar. Students' active participation will be strongly encouraged. After setting a calendar on our first meeting, students will be asked to present a class and propose an agenda for discussion. There will be two short papers (5 pages each) and two drafts of a final paper of 10-12 pages on a comparative topic.

Reading List – TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 006 – The American Presidency in the 1970s.

Instructor(s): D. DAELLENBACH

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on the dynamics of the American Presidency in the 1970s, and decisions and decision-making in the Gerald R. Ford Administration. Students will examine the people and the social, economic, and political issues that shaped the Ford Presidency. The "Seventies" was a pivotal decade in American history. Many Ford names are recognizable – Cheney, Rumsfeld, O'Neill, Greenspan, and others. And the issues also still echo today – energy crisis, tax cuts, a slow economy, the legacy and lessons of the Vietnam War, paritsan politics, razor close elections, Executive Branch relations with Congress, Presidential leadership, bringing a nation together, and more.

The seminar will meet as a class for lecture/discussion during the first weeks of the semester at the Gerald R. Ford Library on North Campus. Studens will then meet individually with the instructor and staff of the Ford Library as they research and write a paper on a topic of their choice utilizing the original document resources of the Ford Library.

Evaluation will be based on discussion, oral presentations to the class, written reports on readings, and the major research paper. Objectives of the course are to explore and gain an understanding of the office of the President and Presidential decision making, to investigate how the White House functions and how it creates the documentary record, and to provide a valuable learning experience of conducting original research on writing a lengthy seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 007 – Women as Subjects and Objects in South Asia.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/396/007.nsf

This course is about women in South Asia, and some topics that will be covered are listed below. The course is also about ways of studying women, ie., historiographical and anthropological issues, and the related topics are bracketed below. Thus, what we will cover includes: birth and death (and controversies of 19th c. reform), marriage (and the workings of patriarchy), motherhood (status of symbols and myths), work (and the discourses of domesticity), leisure (and the emergence of a modern public-private dichotomy), education (and questions of social change). With some reference to other periods as appropriate, the main focus will be on 19th and 20th century South Asia. The aim of the course is to constitute women, in turn, as subjects and objects, to assess these various interpretive strategies, to judge the results, and to broaden a possible methodology that is both rigorous and political.
Prerequisite: at least one previous course on South Asia.
Student evaluation will be on the basis of class discussion, book reviews and papers. Required texts will include readings from History, Anthropology, Cultural Studies, and fiction.

The class will meet once a week for three hours, with an occasional meeting scheduled separately for a film or exhibition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 – Witchcraft in England.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the history of witchcraft in England from the rise of prosecutions in the later 1500s till their cessation in the early 1700s. We shall compare the English experience with witchcraft beliefs and trials on the continent of Europe and in Scotland and New England. Witchcraft will be examined in its social and intellectual context, so that the uses and logic of witch beliefs become clear and we can attempt to solve the problem of why witchcraft prosecutions rose and fell at this particular period in English history. We shall consider the effects of religious, political and socioeconomic change as well as the possibility that there was a broad crisis in gender relations.

Readings and discussions will be based both on recent works by historians and on primary documents. Students will be asked to explore one aspect of the subject further by reading some additional primary sources and writing a paper reporting their findings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 – State-Sponsored Terror in Asia.

Instructor(s): David Chandler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine several twentieth century instances of nationally focussed, government-sponsored campaigns in Asia that involved the mass killings or unmourned deaths of a given regime's political enemies. The ways in which the concepts (and definitions) of politicide, terror and genocide overlap and contradict each other will be studied in a comparative context, drawing on case studies from Cambodia (l975-1979), China (l949-1969), and Indonesia (1965-1966). If time permits, comparative data drawn from other Asian countries will be used. Philosophical, historical, anthropological, and cultural approaches to the data may help to illuminate why and when the terror and the killings occurred and why they proceeded in the ways they did. The discussions will also address the shifting ways in which these crimes against humanity were greeted by outsiders at the time and ever since.

Meetings in the course will include discussion of theory and comparative materials, followed by guided discussions of politicide in Cambodia, Indonesia and China.

Assesmnent will be based on class participation, three short excercises, including a book review, and a research essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 – Jews and Modern Culture.

Instructor(s): Mitchell Hart

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Jews have been intimately involved in the creation of modern culture and in the ideas and judgments generated about "culture." This colloquium explores the nexus of Jews and culture and pays particular attention to the "politics of culture." We will analyze the role of culture in a number of historical contexts and thus address many of the key themes in modern Jewish history: emancipation, assimilation, antisemitism, nationalism, the Holocaust and its aftermath.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students, HISTORY 398, and senior standing. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 404. The Later Roman Empire.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – The Roman Empire of Constantine & Julian.

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Constantine was the first Christian emperor in the Roman empire; his nephew Julian was the last pagan emperor. This course is an analysis of Roman society during the later third and fourth centuries. Topics to be discussed include the near failure of the Roman empire in the third century, the role of Christianity, Constantine's patronage for Christianity, the role of classical culture in an increasingly Christian society, and Julian's promotion of pagan cults.

Readings will consist of translations of ancient texts, including the writings of Lactantius, Eusebius, Constantine, Ammianus, Julian, and Libanius, as well as modern scholarship about the period. All classes will be discussions of the reading material. Requirements include three papers based on the readings and discussions, and pariticipation in all discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 416 / GERMAN 401. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since medieval times, Europeans have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, the reign of Ivan the Terrible, and the transformation of Muscovy in the seventeenth century.

Early Russian history poses particular intellectual challenges. The history of this period is not only completely unfamiliar to most people today, but is also complicated by the unreliability of the source record. Imagine trying to make sense of American history if the authenticity of the Constitution were uncertain and scholars were divided about whether or not the Civil War actually took place. This is the degree of uncertainty that plagues the history of early Russia and makes its study exceptionally exciting and interesting. Each student has the opportunity to contribute original insights and to participate in clarifying the opaque record by filling in some of the blanks. This course allows students to experience the joys of original interpretation and research in a field where the answers are still unknown.

REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
  2. Midterm: in class.
  3. 7-8 page paper on a primary source
  4. Take-Home Final Exam, distributed on Friday April 13, at my office; due Thursday April 19 at my office, by 3:30 p.m. The exam will require approximately 8 pages of writing, typed, double-spaced.
    5)Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

There are no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE READINGS:
(Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street)

  1. Bushkovitch, Paul, Peter the Great
  2. Halperin, Charles J., Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1985).
  3. Skrynnikov, Ruslan G., Ivan the Terrible (Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International Press).
  4. Platonov, S. F., The Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis and Social Struggle in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, trans. by John T. Alexander (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1970).
  5. Pouncy, Carolyn, The Domostroi: Rules for Russian Households in the Time of Ivan the Terrible (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).
  6. Riasanovsky, Nicholas, A History of Russia, (any edition)., Oxford. (expensive text book, but should be available in used copies for more reasonable prices).
  7. Zenkovsky, Serge A., Medieval Russia's Epics, Chronicles and Tales, revised and enlarged ed. (NY: Dutton, 1974).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 433. Russia Under the Tsars: From Peter the Great to the Revolutions of 1917.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elena Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This survey of Imperial Russia examines the political, social, cultural and intellectual history of Russia under the Romanovs, from Peter the Great to Nicholas II. It will focus, among other issues, on the complexity of an empire that included large numbers of non-Russian and non-Christian subjects, the problems of industrial development in an overwhelmingly agrarian society, and the emergence of one of Europe's most sophisticated literary cultures in a country where the vast majority was illiterate. The instructor, Elena Campbell, is visiting from the European University of St. Petersburg.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 442 / AAPTIS 461. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu), Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major theme of this course will be "modernization" of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand,Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) – a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources.

The emphasis, in the fall academic term, will be on the colonial period, 1870-1945. Students, in the next academic term, can choose to take a sequel to the course, which will deal with the period of post-colonialism and of independent Southeast Asian states since the Second World War to the present. Individual students' interest in particular region and period will be fully supported.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – American Business History. Meets with History 569.001

Instructor(s): David Lewis (lewisdl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/lhc/412/001.nsf

An undergraduate course offered by Prof. David Lewis since 1966, "American Business History" surveys the American scene and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events. In addition to subject matter, the course is sprinkled with insights and philosophy of the Business School's most venerable, yet young-at-heart, professor, who was rated five stars by his students the last time he taught the course in Winter 2000.

Coursepack. No text.

Must have Junior or Senior standing. Meets with History 569/LHC 412.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 485 / GERMAN 465 / MEMS 475. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 465.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 – Law Slavery Freedom: US & Latin America.

Instructor(s): Martha S Jones, Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/498/001.nsf

This course will focus on the linkages between slavery and systems of law. We will look both at the legal structures that accompany the holding of property in human beings, and at the experiences of slaves in the courts. Using evidence from both Latin America and the United States, and looking at legislation and transcripts of cases, we will ask how and when slaves themselves were able to use the legal system, and then how freed people were incorporated in legal culture. The readings will include case transcripts, secondary accounts, and some transcribed archival documents, as well as several interpretive works.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 002 – Race & Empire in Victorian Britain.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/498/002.nsf

The central premise of this course is that empire is not just something that happens overseas, but also at home. Both domestic and overseas developments in the British empire are the foci of this course, as we explore, whether indeed, as one Victorian writer put it, 'race [was] everything'.

The course approaches this enormous topic in two ways: episodically, and thematically. Themes that will be addressed include the rise of the discipline of anthropology, evolution and empire, racial ideas and Christianity, the abolition of slavery, and the popular culture of empire. Episodes that will be studied include the 'Jamaica Uprising' of 1865, the New Zealand Wars, Darwinism, the Indian Mutiny-Rebellion, Victorian explorers, and the Boer War.

By the end of the course students will have a sense of the considerable variety of concerns and ideas that shaped Victorian ideas and practices about race and empire. Students will also have a foundational understanding of the Victorian British Empire, some of its problems, and some of its consequences both at home and overseas. They will also be able to critically trace different strands in the development of Victorian racial ideas and the practices of race.

Prior knowledge of Victorian Britain and/or the British empire is not required.

The course will be run as a weekly seminar, and emphasis will be given to taking part in, and leading, discussion. Assessment will be based on: two papers (7-9pp), weekly written responses to readings, a short book review, participation in class discussions, and a final take-home exam. Class attendance is mandatory, and repeated unexcused absences will result in a grade reduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – The Performing Arts in Brazil: Cultural & Historical Perspectives. Meets with RCSSCI 460.001

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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