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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 7:50 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 101. Art and Agency in a Pre-Modern World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Art & Agency introduces students to the disciplinary practices and goals of art history via encounters with great monuments (both famous and little-known) of the visual cultures of Europe, Egypt, and western Asia from the Stone Age through the Middle Ages. The course develops thematically around strategically selected and thought-provoking artistic creations. This exemplary material ranges from cave paintings and fertility figurines of the Stone Age, to the royal and personal arts of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Iran, to the Parthenon of Athens, to monuments and jewelry of imperial Rome, to gold-encrusted early Byzantine mosaics, to religious spaces and notions of representation in Judaism, early Christianity, and early Islam, to the cloisters and cathedrals of medieval Christian Europe. Our project with this rich selection of artistic production is to frame notions of cultural identity as a major axis of interpretive interest in the history of art. Art & Agency emphasizes that art production and deployment in the pre-modern world of the Greater Mediterranean region were charged with message-conveying power that often crystallized around issues of otherness, of inclusion-exclusion, of constructions of identity vis-à-vis perceptions of ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and class. The socially charged nature of the art we explore here enables us to consider the cultures of a pre-modern world in terms that reverberate with special contemporary relevance as well as historical importance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 112. History of Photography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Nicholas Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the history of photography from the invention of the medium in 1839 to its most recent developments. It is designed to introduce students to skills of analyzing and interpreting photographs as well as to present photography's history as both an art form and as a social phenomenon. Since the meaning of a photograph changes depending on the methodology used to interpret it, this course will also introduce students to a number of different methods of visual analysis, including formal analysis, semiotics, psychoanalysis, and Marxism (as well as other forms of contextual analysis). In addition, the development of photographic theory will also be briefly examined.

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HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Modernism and Modernity: Art and Culture in Paris, 1848-1900.

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers key issues in the history of modernist painting from the Revolution of 1848 to the end of the nineteenth century. This is the period during which bohemia and the avant-garde (as concepts and as active constellation of artists, critics, dealers and patrons) developed their characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns; apparent insistence on innovation, originality, and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a somewhat strained allegiance with radical politics and alternative subcultures. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of the language of visual representation, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting; hence the rapid succession of avant-garde "movements," from Realism and Impressionism to Synthetism and Neo-Impressionism.

The course aims to examine a succession of notorious modernist strategies, including (among other phenomena) the negativity of Manet's Parisian imagery, Courbet's presumed populism, and Neo-Impressionism's psuedo-positivist critique of modernity. Readings and discussions are designed to consider the correlations between a wide variety of modernist projects. How, for example, might we construct a theoretical model that accounts simultaneously for Toulouse-Lautrec's cynical immersion in the world of cut-rate entertainment and Seurat's "scientific" renderings of the same subjects? What version of modernist history can make sense of painting's claims to "high" culture and its active engagement with both "modern life" and political radicalism? What is the state of "representation" in an art that attempts to dispense with traditional formal and narrative conventions? These are difficult questions, and there are no clear-cut answers. Our objective in asking them is to recapture, over the course of the academic term, some sense of their complexity, and of the argumentative climate in which modernist strategies were conceived and employed.

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HISTART 203 / ASIAN 203. Chinese Art and Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the arts and religions of China, as well as an introduction to the technique of visual analysis in historical studies. It examines the three major religions in China Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism from the perspective of visual representations and religious practice. Religious traditions of minorities such as Lamaism in Tibet, Shamanism in the northeast, Muslim in the northwest, ghost beliefs in the southwest, and the Mazu (sea goddess) cult in the coastal regions (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) will also be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 221 / CLARCH 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clarch/221/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 250 / MEMS 250. Italian Renaissance Art, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the works of Giotto, Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Piero della Francesca come to be regarded as so important in the history of western art? Why, even within the artists' lifetimes, was their art regarded as signaling a "rebirth" of painting and sculpture? This course aims at an understanding of early Renaissance art by seeing it in relation to broader transformations in the culture of the Italian city-states in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The city will be viewed as the site of divergent uses of art by different communities and interests. Images were employed in the expression of identity and status, as a strategic means of producing consensus or exploiting social division, and in an appeal for sacred mediation on behalf of the living and the dead. We will study different genres of visual representation (the altarpiece, mural painting, public sculpture) and the different social spaces where art was displayed (civic buildings, piazze, religious institutions, the domestic environment). Works of art will be considered as modes of argument and as points of interaction among networks of clients, artists, social groups and institutions (guilds, family associations, courts, confraternities), and figures of authority (popes, rulers, citizens, abbots and abbesses). From this multiplicity of uses and responses emerged highly varied conceptions of the nature of the image and the role of the artist, which, in turn, influenced artistic performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 260. European Painting and Sculpture of the Seventeenth Century.

Section 001 Baroque Art.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After an opening review of 16th-C. artistic and ideological developments, the course considers the revolutionary achievements of Annibale Carracci and Caravaggio, who together are shown to have established the premises of the three major trends in 17th-C. art: Baroque Classicism; the "Ecstatic" Baroque; Baroque realism. Each of these sub-categories and their innovative variations will then be discussed in turn, with examples of religious and historical imagery, mythology, genre, still-life, portraiture, and landscape drawn from the painting and sculpture of Italy, France, Spain, Flanders, and Holland. Attention will be given to the special sociocultural circumstances under which the works were produced, while simultaneously the uniqueness of major masters among them Poussin, Rubens, Bernini, Velazquez, Vermeer, and Rembrandt will be revealed. But this course will end with an attempt to demonstrate that, for all this diversity, there is an underlying philosophical unity to the art of this extraordinary period. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations and a short museum paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 271. Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, State-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Neo-Impressionism that emerged in opposition to official art. The Nineteenth Century is the period during which modern art developed its characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns: an insistence on innovation, originality, and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a somewhat strained allegiance with radical politics and alternative subcultures. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of visual representation, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting. The course is designed to encourage close readings of images (by David, Gericault, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Cézanne, et al.) within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 285 / AAPTIS 285. Introduction to the Art and Architecture of the Islamic World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys Islamic art and architecture from Spain to India and from the advent of Islam in the 7th century to the rise of Colonialism. What were the processes through which this new venture gave shape to particular Islamic idioms? Architecture (mosques, mausoleums, palaces, garden ensembles and urban environments), the luxury objects of utility (ceramics, metalwork, glass, textiles, etc.), painting and the arts of the book will be explored as manifestations and visual representations of the production of Islam, enunciating its spiritual and intellectual values, and the socioeconomic parameters that contributed to the formation and development of its distinctive cultural system. Special attention will be given to the interaction between the new faith and pre-Islamic traditions of the conquered through the dynamic interplay between indigenous and Qur'anic cultures. The problematics in interpreting vastly diverse cultural systems as an unchanging, monolithic phenomenon will be emphasized.

Interactive class discussions relating the visual with the discursive, a midterm, a final exam, small written assignments on museum objects, and museum visits are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 360 / CAAS 380. Special Topics in African Art.

Section 001 African Diaspora - The Americas.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTART 108 or 214, and upperclass standing; CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will investigate cultural production generally set outside "the fine arts" in case studies of "folk art," pre-Lenten Carnival costume design and performances, sacred spaces, and multi-media religious objects made in Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and the United States. In addition, we will scrutinize the very category that is African Diaspora art: how has the African Diaspora become a field of scholarly inquiry and a popular interest outside the academy? What does "diaspora" include, exclude, and presume?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 Muslim Kingship. Meets with AAPTIS 291.001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course takes the palace as the locus of spatial and visual enunciations of Muslim kingship. The palace and its representational plentitude from architecture and landscaping to ceremonials and their accoutrements, from spectacle and spectatorship to gendered zones of access will be analyzed as carefully orchestrated manifestations of the cultural production of authority. We shall trace the political, economic, social, and cultural particularities of Muslim kingdoms and their distinctive rhetoric of sovereignty through experiencing the palaces, their furnishings, and the luxury objects of utility (including illustrated manuscripts, ceramics, metalwork, textiles, etc.) . Special attention will be given to the ways in which Qur'anic culture merges with pre-Islamic Persian and Byzantine traditions of kingship. Our goal is to gain a nuanced understanding of the iconography of kingship in the Islamic world through close and critical considerations of the visual and the literary. Interactive class discussions relating the visual with the discursive, small written assignments leading to a final paper, a final exam, and museum visits are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 MODERN ART AND ARCHITICTURE AT THE MARGINS: South Africa, India, Brazil

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern art and architecture in Europe and America arose in the twentieth century in the context of robust art worlds. But how did modernism get itself invented "at the margins," where such art worlds were largely absent, where intellectual, cultural, economic and political dependency remained colonial, where the circle of artists was small and economies were rudimentary? The pressure of modern art and architecture to produce conformity was significant, and yet the urge towards nationalism and the recovery of "indigenous traditions" was also powerful? How have diverse cultures "at the margins" dealt with these pressures, and achieved originality? The course will consider this problematic of visual culture at the margins comparatively, by studying developments in South Africa, India and Brazil. Its focus will be broad, ranging over art, architecture and public monuments, beginning with colonial formations and leading to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 427 / CLARCH 427. Pompeii: Its Life and Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clarch/427/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 428 / CLARCH 428. The Public Spaces of Imperial Rome.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 431 / AMCULT 433. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century," played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This class will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories - from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 436 / CLARCH 436. Hellenistic and Roman Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clarch/436/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 436.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 437 / CLARCH 437. Egyptian Art and Archaeology.

Section 001 Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Instructor(s): John Baines

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/insthum/411/001.nsf

See Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 448. Medieval Manuscript Illumination.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to an art form highly developed in the Middle Ages: the richly illuminated hand-written book. Beginning with the invention of the codex in late antiquity and ending with the advent of the printed book in the early modern era, the course will treat significant moments in the history of manuscript. Masterworks ranging from the Lindisfarne Gospels to the Tres Riches Heures will be studied as products of particular historical circumstances. Topics include the process of making a manuscript, the changing status of scribes and illuminators, the evolving roles of patrons, types of books and their functions, and forms of decoration. Visits to the Rare Book Room will be arranged to look at original manuscripts and facsimiles. There will be a midterm and final, a shorter and a longer paper or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 463. Varieties of Dutch and Flemish Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102 and 260. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the extraordinary production of pictorial art in the Netherlands during the seventeenth century, and key roles played by pictures in the formation and life of the Dutch Republic. Our explorations will take us into the spheres of painting, drawings, prints, maps, book illustrations and the entire range of pictorial representations and technologies that constituted Dutch visual culture. The course will situate Dutch art within its historical and social circumstances, and investigate its relation to the broader visual culture of the Dutch Republic. Lectures will give special emphasis to the innovative work in still life, landscape, portraiture, perspective and optics, and scenes of social life for which Netherlandish artists have long been renowned. Discussions will examine the character, meanings, and functions of these pictures; the aesthetic, social, and economic values they enjoyed, and the ways of seeing they generated. In the process we will look at how Dutch pictures were made and marketed, how people made sense of them, and how they circulated both in the Netherlands and beyond.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 468. Sculptural Practices of the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces a radical shift in sculptural sensibility and practice over the last century or so from a conception of sculpture as "object" to one of "place" a shift well described by the minimalist sculptor Carl Andre in terms of the successive transformation of interest in the Statue of Liberty:

"In the days of form sculptors were interested in the Statue of Liberty because of the modeling of Bartholdi and the modeling of the copper sheet that was [its] form....Then people came to be interested in structure....in Eiffel's cast iron interior structure...[in] taking the copper sheets off...and looking at the cast iron or steel that constituted the structure on which the copper plates were hung. Now sculptors aren't even interested in Eiffel's structure any more. They're interested in Bedloe's Island and what to do with that. So I think of Bedloe's Island as a place."

Beginning with an analysis of two extremely polemical arguments Lessing's space-time differential (1766) and Krauss' expanded field (1978) we will examine the history of European and American sculpture since Rodin, focusing on four main issues in particular:

  1. the problem of temporality in a medium traditionally assumed to be static;
  2. the advent of construction as a mode of sculptural production;
  3. the resistance to integral form and the declaration of process itself as a form of sculptural practice;
  4. the shift from a (modernist) conception of sculpture-as-object to one of sculpture-as-place or situation (site specificity).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 Confluence of Cultures: the Making of 'India' during the 5th through 15th Centuries CE. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Patel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Conventional surveys in "Indian" art history often cover broader time spans with less emphasis on particularities, and develop the topic from a linear and regionally limited perspective. This course hopes to broaden those parameters by looking at long-enduring patterns of cultural confluences in Asia, which were instrumental in creating what we term 'Indian art' today.

The course will explore the making of visual idioms in South Asia from the 5th through 15th centuries, particularly (but not exclusively) in painting and architecture. The emphasis will be on tracing the coalescences of distinctive modes of building and representation, which were essentially processes of cultural confluence between the "indigenous" Indic traditions, and those flowing in from the Near East and East Asia. In setting the stage for this examination, some previous cultural links will be explored as well: Although the focus will be on the millennium spanning the 5th-15th centuries, an important introduction to patterns and mechanisms of cultural transmission during the Harappan (2500-1700 BCE) and Early Historic (3rd century BCE-3rd century CE) periods will be provided. An examination of the continuity or cessation of these patterns will be an important line of enquiry underpinning our look at the subsequent centuries. The course will have mid-term and final examinations, along with a short report on objects in local collections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 Research in Chinese Art and Culture: Chinese Narrative Art (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as a workshop primarily for undergraduate students who are interested in doing research in Chinese art and culture. It examines the issues of political expression, identity construction, history writing, social memory, moral education, religious propaganda, and personal experience by focusing on narrative works of art. The instructor will provide introductory lectures on the original visual materials and related secondary publications. With the guidance of the instructor, students are expected to select and carry out their own mini research projects and present their studies to the class. Students will not only learn how to do research in Chinese art history but also how to dramatize their presentations with visual aids.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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