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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars


This page was created at 7:56 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


A total of 20 credits of LHSP courses may be counted toward the minimum 120 credits required for an LS&A degree.


LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 – Finding Community in the Community. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Ben McDonough (mcdonou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will meet for the first eight weeks of the term only. Explore your identity within your many communities: LHSP, Alice Lloyd Hall, U-M, as well as Ann Arbor and its environs. This course will focus on how communities interact and co-exist, such as town and gown relationships. At the same time the course will offer several opportunities for exploring the campus, Ann Arbor, and surrounding areas, highlighting museums, historical sites, and other points of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 – Community Service: Habitat for Humanity. Eight-week course. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Marianne Ryan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We'll examine this acclaimed international, non-profit organization through readings, discussions, and hands-on participation. We'll look at the goal of eliminating poverty housing worldwide and read a book written by the organization's founder, Millard Fuller. Students will be required to participate in at least one build day with the University of Michigan student chapter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 003 – High Tech Community: Digital Yearbook. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): David Peters

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Help create an electronic version of the LHSP community. We'll examine what it means to be a community while archiving its development. Learn new skills as we document the 2002-03 year, capturing classes, events, field trips, parties, and candid residence hall experiences. Learn interviewing, photo, editing, and technical skills. The yearbook will be distributed on a CD to each LHSP student at the end of the academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 004 – Community Development: Rituals, Traditions, and the Boar's Head Festival (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Leland Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We'll explore the meaning of rituals and traditions within the context of developing community. What role do rituals, celebrations, and holidays play within the fabric of community? How and why do traditions change over the course of time? While exploring these issues we will also work on the continuation of an Alice Lloyd Hall tradition: the Boar's Head Festival, a medieval celebration of the winter solstice, and in more modern parlance, a means of celebrating and rejoicing the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 005 – Community Development: Rituals, Traditions, and Halloween. 8-week course. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Jean Rhee

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will meet for the first eight weeks of the term only. We'll explore the meaning of rituals and traditions within the context of developing community. What role do rituals, celebrations, and holidays play within the fabric of community? How and why do traditions change over the course of time? While exploring these issues we will continue an Alice Lloyd Hall tradition: the Halloween Party, an opportunity to organize a community service event for elementary school children, and create an amazing experience for the residents of Alice Lloyd Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 006 – Community Service: Solving Hunger & Homelessness. 8-week course. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster (pskuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/lhsp/100/006.nsf

This course will meet for the first eight weeks of the term only. In this course, we will not only discuss the issues of hunger but also do something about it! Students will volunteer with an organization that helps to feed or house those in need. We'll read and reflect on hunger and homelessness and will get to know first hand some of the ways people cope with poverty. We'll look at different approaches to these issues and devote our own time and energy in trying to figure it all out.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 007 – Contributions to Community: Sojourner Truth. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Charlotte Whitney

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll examine the life and times of this remarkable woman, examining the question of her identity within the context of her communities. Born into slavery, she chose to become an abolitionist, human rights activist, and women's rights proponent. Why did she choose her unusual path? What were the core values that inspired her courageous deeds? Was her self-identity involved in her name change? The course will include a day trip to visit the Sojourner Truth Institute of Battle Creek.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 008 – Academic and Career Exploration. (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Tim Martin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will meet for the first eight weeks of the term only. This course will help you focus on yourself, your academic plans, summer internships, and potential career choices, emphasizing the many resources both inside and outside the University. It will include using interest inventories and personality type indicators as well as several online resources. Students will learn how to create resumes, build portfolios, and develop professional interviewing skills. One class will be held at the UM Career Planning and Placement Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 115. Literature and the Arts in Society, II.

Section 001 – Advanced Art Expression.

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker (marktuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

If a picture is worth a thousand words then picture this:

Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dali, Paul Klee, Claude Monet, Eric Fischl, Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Janet Fish, David Salle, Edward Hopper, Max Beckman, Chuck Close, Jim Dine, Red Grooms, Kathe Kollwitz, Mark DiSuvero, Joan Miro, Alexander Calder, Edouard Manet, Degas, Diego Rivera, Mary Cassatt, Louise Nevelson, Alice Neel, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Emil Nolde … and YOU!

In this course we will draw, paint, and sculpt our own works with the help of many great artists who have come before us. This will be both a rigorous exploration of modern art and a serious development of the creative self. While the emphasis will be on art making, art historical research, group discussion and critiques will inform and direct our creative process. This course is designed specifically for non-art majors who feel the process of understanding and making art should be more fully integrated into their lives.

Prerequisite: LHSP 140 or equivalent previous art experience
Time: by arrangement
Mandatory first meeting: Tuesday, September 3rd, 8p.m.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 001 – Adolescence, adulthood, and the battle to become one's self: an exploration of identity formation through coming-of-age novels.

Instructor(s): Tim Martin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

College is a time of great personal transformation. In moving from the familiar to the new, from adolescence to adulthood, we often challenge fundamental aspects of our identities. But how do we envision the process of identity creation or re-creation? How do we become the person we end up being? Are we born with our unique sense of identity, like a solid core, or do we manipulate its fluidity in accord with our will? Perhaps our identities are the complex sum of our responses to our surrounding environment.

Over the course of the semester, we will explore conceptions of identity-building using the "coming-of-age" novel as our guide. We will read Jamaica Kincaid's Lucy, J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Literature is often said to mirror reality, and by studying these novels you will get a better sense of how you envision the self and the development of identity. The "coming-of-age" novel provides fertile ground for such an inquiry, as our texts will cover many facets of our kaleidoscopic identities, including gender, race, sexuality, culture, and religion. How the protagonists in these novels come to terms with these aspects of the self can inform the reader of her/his own path to self-realization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 002 – Procreation or recreation: Can we control ourselves?

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster (pskuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/lhsp/125/002.nsf

Do we have control over our own sexual reproduction? Who decides whether we should wait, engage, or abstain, and what determines the consequences of our sexual behavior? Authorities around the world are talking about sex. The Pope and the President try to determine whether schools teach us about the birds and the bees, or the diaphragm and the dental dam. The United Nations has something to say about using condoms. And governments from Austria to Zimbabwe decide whether women who obtain abortions should be given money to cover the cost or be arrested and put in prison.

This course will explore the values underlying reproduction within the law and public policy. We will also examine how the laws and policies are made. We will engage in policy-making and explore where our own values fit within the process. Five five-page papers will help students to develop an understanding of the issues and to articulate opinions about sexual reproduction and the function of policy makers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 003 – The Ethnographic Method.

Instructor(s): Leland Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How are our lives shaped by the institutions that surround us? What impact do media images, journalistic descriptions, and academic analyses have on our daily experiences? How is the University environment structured, and what is it supposed to accomplish? What is the relationship between the University and the rest of the city? And how important is all of this, anyway? These are the kinds of questions that will be addressed in this course, both through readings and through ethnographic study.

Ethnography is the study of human behavior by observation "in the field." It is historically associated with distant lands and exotic cultures and studying just how different "those people" are from "us." However, a good deal can be learned from the ethnographic study of our neighbors and the institutions we deal with on a daily basis. This course will introduce you to the ethnographic method through excerpts from classic anthropological studies and more recent studies of American society, and then guide each of you through your own ethnographic project.

This ethnographic study will in turn provide you with the data and the experiences to critically evaluate the University environment, college life, and certain key institutions in American society. You will use both personal experience and the opinions of others in the media and the academy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 004 – American public schools: Are they doing their job?

Instructor(s): Sara Woodward

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Education reform has been a hot topic of debate since the Columbine shootings three years ago. From Capital Hill to dining room tables, our nation seems to agree that something is terribly wrong with our public schools, but there is no consensus about what should be done. Are teachers lazy or underpaid? Do school vouchers and charter schools provide much needed competition for failing public schools, or are they just a sneaky way to drain resources from the neediest children? Why is there a persistent "achievement gap" between the performance of black and white students, inner city and suburban schools? Who is to blame for this achievement gap – parents, students, schools, or a racist society? Do we simply need to give schools and teachers more money, or do we need to overhaul the entire American public education system?

In this course we will do three things: first, we will examine our own conception of what public education is supposed to accomplish. Next, we will take a deep look at the reality of American schools: from pre-school to high school, from suburban to urban campuses, and from the college application process to the juvenile justice system. Finally, we will discuss proposed avenues of change, such as charter schools, schools of choice, vouchers, and the small school movement. Students will read and discuss the opinions of those on all sides of the political spectrum, forming their own arguments for what they believe should be done.

The course will be a combination of learning through the reading and writing of others – scholars, educators, and policy-makers – as well as reflecting on the student's own educational experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 005 – From Camelot to Kandahar: Freedom and American myth in the late 20th century.

Instructor(s): David Peters

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It's one of the most basic words in our political vocabulary, but what does freedom mean? What does it mean to us as individuals, as a group, and how do we tie our contemporary definitions into historical experience? In his inaugural address in 1960, John F. Kennedy announced, "not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom – symbolizing an end as well as a beginning – signifying renewal as well as change." After the World Trade Center attacks, President Bush stated that, "freedom itself was attacked." If each generation of Americans remakes itself in some basic way, then what will we, living at the beginning of the 21st century, bring to a renewed vision of freedom?

Over the past forty years the meaning of freedom has been transformed dramatically by the Civil Rights movements, feminism, neo-conservatism, and a host of other social movements. Each of these movements asserts some relationship to American history, basing its claims on historical arguments that may or may not hold water factually, but that tap into deeply ingrained ideas about who we are and who we should be as a people and as individuals. These myths, as we shall see, are an important part of our reality. In sorting out myth from fact, we need to remember that some myths are crucial ways of coming to grips with the world around us.

This course will explore the different definitions of freedom that coexist in today's America, seeing how they all draw on the same basic vocabulary and historical mythology to reach dramatically different conclusions. Our readings will range over the full spectrum of political and social ideas, and the "texts" for our class will include not only traditional scholarship but also samples from popular culture from the '60s to today. Writing assignments will challenge you to reconcile conflicting ideas, building your own arguments out of the raw materials provided by the readings, other course materials, and class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 006 – Memoirs on rites of passage and the quest for identity.

Instructor(s): Jean Rhee

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do people find, forge, or defend their sense of identity when they find themselves as newcomers/outsiders in an alien environment? People often react to these situations by re-examining, if not completely redefining their identities, and by seeking to assert themselves in new ways. Throughout this course, we will explore how people create, transform, and assert their identities when under pressure by examining memoirs that tell stories about identity crisis. We will read Stephen King's On Writing, Mary Karr's The Liars' Club, and selections from Helen Barolini's Chiaroscuro: Essays of Identity. We will then explore our own lives and examine how we responded to the life changes we have all experienced by telling life stories of our own. Students will be expected to produce two essays on the assigned readings, a few short response pieces, and a chapter from their own memoirs as their final paper. A significant portion of class time will be dedicated to workshopping student writings as a group.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 007 – You must be mad…! Literary depictions of insanity as social rhetoric.

Instructor(s): Liz Moody

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be "insane," and why are we so uncomfortable with the concept? How are "different" thoughts and ideas often construed as the product of mental disease (and subsequently discredited)? How does mental illness set one apart from society and how does it, at the same time, seem to stem from a lack of meaningful or normal social interactions? What is the significance of these social rifts associated with insanity?

Drawing mostly on fictional accounts, we will explore how "different" lifestyles, cultural groups, and ways of thinking are marginalized by being categorized as insane and how different authors use "insane" characters to facilitate their social commentary. We will use a number of texts and films featuring insane or unreliable characters and ask, among other questions, to what extent their mental illness leads us to discredit them and what it adds to or subtracts from their accounts. We will then discuss how the concept of mental illness is being used in each text by those in power as a tool to discredit those who challenge their ideals and ask whether the authors seem to be sympathetic or critical to the phenomena they describe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 008 – Affirmative action or legal discrimination: A case study of the University of Michigan law suits & affirmative action in higher education.

Instructor(s): Ben McDonough (mcdonou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with an interest in law or race (and this really is an or), this course introduces affirmative action's role in higher education. To provide an introduction to the interaction of race and law in American history, the course begins by screening the film, To Kill A Mockingbird. Next, after reading some introductory materials on the history of affirmative action and possibly some short court cases, we will read five affirmative action cases, including excerpts from the groundbreaking Bakke v. The Regents of the University of California, and Hopwood v. University of Texas Law School, the two University of Michigan cases, Grutter v. Bollinger, and Gratz v. Bollinger, and excerpts from the recently released appeal of Grutter v. Bollinger, by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court. Over the course of the term, we will anticipate and track further developments in these cases, watch and discuss films related to affirmative action and the civil rights movement, and read and comment on related articles. As time and fortune permit, students may also be asked to participate in local events relating to affirmative action and law, such as lectures on affirmative action or visits to the Washtenaw County Courthouse.

By studying law and well-reasoned argumentative thinking, this course will sharpen your critical reading and writing skills. Since writing is the law's most enduring form of expression in our society, law serves as an especially appropriate subject for a course on argumentative writing. In the classroom, we will study the legal and historical basis of affirmative action in the United States' laws and policies. We will also discuss affirmative action's value and potential cost to our society. Last, by "workshopping" each other's essays, you will learn the art of constructive commentary and the responsibility that comes with discussing a peer's efforts. Course requirements include five original essays, vibrant class participation, and additional short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 009 – Creativity, copying, and the control of information.

Instructor(s): Marianne Ryan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why does George Lucas have a love/hate relationship with Star Wars "fan films"? Should it be illegal to download MP3 music from the Internet? Who decides when it's okay to use someone else's work, and how much is too much? How can we balance conflicting social principles when the First Amendment collides with copyright law?

This fall the Supreme Court will examine these issues in a seminal legal case that will decide the fate of the Internet over the next twenty years. We will explore what's really at stake by reading and discussing articles from WIRED magazine and other journals, as well as selections from the new book The Future of Ideas. Together we'll interpret brief position papers by interest groups such as artists' rights coalitions and the media industry. We'll also search for relevant materials in print and online, and share them with each other.

Students will hone their writing skills and analytical abilities through a series of five papers written from different perspectives. They will seek to understand the views of key players on all sides of this fundamental debate. In addition, students will develop their own set of policy recommendations based on their personal value systems. Students will be encouraged to publish their work beyond the classroom in order to contribute their opinions to this vital dialogue.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 – Draw another breath: Drawing the human body.

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker (marktuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Close your eyes and imagine that you were born completely without sight. Now imagine that your sight was miraculously restored. What would you "see"? Look at your hand and wiggle your fingers. Is this what you expected your hand to look like? Would you be able to comprehend the world around you or would everything be such a confusing mass of shapes, lines, colors, textures, spaces, shadows, and light that you feel overwhelmed by the complexity of it all?

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to draw is a means towards learning to see. Learning to see, not what you think you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through drawing you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are. Our subject matter will be the human body - something simultaneously intimate and yet completely foreign. Bring an open mind and plenty of stamina because the first few weeks will feel much like learning to ride a bike; blind, of course.

Note: This course will require the purchase of various art materials related to drawing. A specific list of materials will be available on the first day of class. There is also a studio fee of $50, which will cover the hiring of the model(s). Expect at least 4 hours per week of drawing assignments in addition to class attendance and participation. There may also be field trips to museums, which will be scheduled separately.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 002 – Experimental Art II: History of Performance Art.

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs (tubbsbl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Destroying the barriers and preconceptions around making art. Is it Art? Define Art. Question Art. Experiment. Become Art. This course is involved with the study of Performance Art and its evolution from Pop Art, Public Art, Graffiti, Political Art, Conceptual Art, Installations, Theater, and Music. Research includes films, writings, music, philosophy, and performance art experiments. Analyze the conceptual development and critique the social impact. Recreate their work. Think. Then you answer the question. No prerequisites or lab fee, but always be prepared to get dirty. Paint is messy. You never know what kind of tricks I might have in store for you.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 – (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 229 / ENGLISH 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001, 003 – Writing for the Real World.

Instructor(s): Pat Rubadeau (patruba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/229/002.nsf

See English 229.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LHSP 229 / ENGLISH 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002, 004.

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 229.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LHSP 299. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lloyd Hall Scholars Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for LHSP.


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