Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 7:56 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/101/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to some of the major – and even some minor – figures in Western political thought, from ancient Greece to our day. Our goal is to understand how the contributions of various thinkers at different times have helped people answer enduring questions about political life: What is justice? Must we obey political authorities? What is human good? What may do in our pursuit of our goals? The course will combine historical with contemporary readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. The kinds of questions considered might include the following: What impact do interest groups have on governmental policy? Are there real differences between the two major political parties? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? How do members of Congress decide how to vote? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/140/001.nsf

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings – and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by setting standards for judging theories of international politics and reviews well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is then used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 301(400). Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A study beginning with the cultural context of the Greek polis and the origins of western political theory and then moving though to the political thought of the early renaissance. Texts will be selected from among Aeschylus, Sophocles, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas Aquinas, Christine de Pizan, and Machiavelli. Among the themes considered will be the relation of public and private life, morality and politics, theory and practice, political participation and community, justice and equality, nature and convention, political authority, and the sources of political legitimacy. Class meetings will include both lecture and small group discussion assignments. Course requirements will include take-home essays and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 311(411). American Political Processes.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course views outcomes in American elections – presidential and congressional – as expressions of public opinion. While frequent references will be made to recent elections, our central purpose will be to understand American elections in general. For example, How well do citizens choose a president, a senator, or a member of congress? Readings will focus primarily around a course pack. Grades likely will depend on a midterm, a final exam, and a 10-page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 314(483). American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/314/001.nsf

In this course we consider the importance of political parties for democracy and the nature of party politics in the United States. We seek a broad understanding of what American parties are, how they are operate, and how they have evolved. We are particularly concerned with the significance of parties for elections and representation across national, state, and local governments. Class will consist of both lecture and discussion, and evaluations will be based on a combination of exams and papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 318(413). American Constitutional Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course in political science and political theory concerned with law. The course focuses on one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental principles.

It addresses: the role of language in grounding the legitimacy of the political order; the ways (if any) in which that language is translated into reality; and how those translations are justified. In connection with those general themes, we shall focus on three additional questions:

  1. WHAT is the (or a) Constitution;
  2. WHO are to be its authoritative interpreters; and
  3. HOW are those interpreters to go about the business of interpreting?

We shall take up topics such as judicial review, interdepartmental relations, federalism, the power to wage war, and constitutional crisis.

Assignments will include participation in a Moot Court. Some background in American history, American institutional politics, or political theory is desirable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 325(420) / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 327(423). Politics of the Metropolis.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps327f02.html

This course examines the political life of American cities and the metropolitan regions in which they are embedded. Relevant institutions include city government, public authorities, the business sector, nonprofit agencies and organizations, neighborhood groups, and more. Issues include city and regional governance, economic development, urban sprawl, the provision of public services, and the ways that race, ethnicity, and social class are implicated in these and other issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 339(428) / ASIAN 428 / SOC 426 / PHIL 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Lieberthal (kliebert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/339/001.nsf

This course seeks to convey an overall understanding of the evolution of China during the tumultuous twentieth century, with a strong focus on the current period. While concerned primarily with domestic developments, the course also considers the impact of the global arena on China and the issues China poses in international politics. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China. Three hours of lecture and one of discussion per week. Term paper and two exams. Does not require permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 342(445). Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the political development of the socialist countries of Eastern Europe from revolution through reaction, to attempts at reform, and to the post-Communist period. After examining the political cultures of the region, the course analyzes the Stalinist period, attempts at de-Stalinization, and the search for political alternatives.

The interaction of rulers and the ruled is examined by studying the elites, ethnic and social groups, public opinion, and dissent in the area. We study attempts at political and economic reform, the fundamental changes of 1989-1990, and the present state of politics in Eastern Europe. This lecture course requires a final examination, one or two short papers, and a choice of midterm examination or term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 347(448). Politics and Society in Latin America.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/347/001.nsf

This is a course on the government and politics of Latin America with a focus on democracy, parties, elections, and institutions. After an analysis of the common historical background, the course will consider the current characteristics of democratic government in Latin America – its achievements, shortcomings, and perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of parties and other institutional factors on the stability and quality of democracy in the region. The cases of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela will be examined closely. No prior knowledge of the region is assumed or required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark A Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will present both factual and interpretive material about the Arab- Israeli conflict, an international dispute that has lasted for almost a century and whose significance extends far beyond the Middle East. After providing background information about Israel and the Arab world, including the Arabs of Palestine, the course will trace the historical development of the conflict from its origins in the 19th century until the present. The course will also examine the most important issues associated with the conflict, giving special attention to the competing territorial claims advanced by Israelis and Palestinians and to the rights of self-determination asserted by each. Attention will be given as well to relations between Israel and the Arab states. In discussing the many controversial issues associated with the Arab-Israeli conflict, the course will strive for objectivity and balance and will encourage the evaluation of differing points of view, including not only the competing views of Israelis and Arabs but also the important differences existing within Israel and the Arab world. The instructor for the course has attended university and subsequently conducted research in both the Arab world and Israel, having spent over four years in the former and almost three years in the latter. He visits the area frequently and regularly collaborates with Israeli and Arab scholars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 354(454). Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/354/001.nsf

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most dynamic and complex regions, and is of growing importance on the global stage. This course offers an introduction to the region for advanced undergraduates; it is also an introduction to some of the broader political, economic, and environmental issues in the developing world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 355(455). Government and Politics of China.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ellis Joffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topic of this lecture course will be "Politics and Development in China." It is built around the theme of China's search for a development model that addresses its basic problems and fits the predilections of its leaders. This search began with the establishment of the communist regime in 1949 and continues to this day. The course traces its evolution and the convulsive changes that it has generated. Although the approach is chronological, the narrative is interlaced with an analysis of these changes, the reasons behind them, and their implications.

Requirement: an exam at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 360(460). Problems in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/360/001.nsf

This course provides an in-depth look at theories of international relations, their logic, and their application to understand individual events. The topics covered include the causes of war, negotiation, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international institutions and cooperation. Because strategic interaction is central to world politics, the student will be introduced to game theory–a mathematical theory of strategic interaction–and its application to international politics. The game theory models to be presented in the class require only high school algebra for their solution. A series of cases are used to illustrate the application of the theories to specific situations in world politics. Course Requirements and Grading: The course will be graded on the basis of weekly problem sets, two short papers (1000 words), and a final examination on the last day of class. There will not be problem sets on the weeks when the papers are due and the week of the final exam. The weight of each in the final grade is as follows:
Problem Sets 50%
Short Papers 25%
Final Examination 25%.

Students are expected to attend class.

This course requires one book: David A. Lake and Robert Powell, eds. 1999. Strategic Choice and International Relations. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 379(479). Advanced Topics in Foreign Policy.

World

Section 001 – Russian Foreign Policy.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course focuses on the international behavior of the Soviet Union and its primary successor state, Russia. The course will cover U.S./Soviet relations, the rise and fall of the Soviet empire in Europe, and contemporary Russian relations with the United States and Soviet successor states. Particular emphasis will be placed on the link between Russian elite and mass attitudes and foreign policy choices. Recommended as background: POLSCI 160 and/or 444, REES 395. There will be a midterm paper that follows the format of review articles in the journal World Politics, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 395 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / HISTORY 332 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 407. Marxism and 20th Century Radicalism.

Theory

Section 001 – The Soviet Experiment.

Instructor(s): Gordon N Harding

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course could be subtitled "The Soviet Experiment"; not because it is a course on Soviet politics, but because it will focus on the the evolution and implications of Marxist/commmunist ideas.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will critically compare and examine key figures in contemporary continental political theory. Readings will be drawn from the works of Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Sorel, Gramsci, Michels, Schmitt, Mosca, Schumpeter, Althusser, Foucault, Castoriadis, and Habermas. We will focus on how these thinkers approach the concepts of power, the state, socialism and communism, representation, ideology and hegemony, democracy, liberalism, and legitimacy from the point of view of political modernity and its challenges.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 432. Law and Public Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marvin Krislov

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/432/001.nsf

This course will focus on the ways our courts do and do not intervene in politics and the political process, both on the federal and state level. Topics to be covered include: the regulation of voting, voting rights, the Census, Congressional reapportionment, campaign finance, and the selection (or election) of federal and state judges. Students will be asked to write several short papers or memoranda.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 001 – Courts, Politics, & Society.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The American judicial process – its structure, logic, and myriad legal and political functions – is the central focus of this course. We will begin the academic term with an analysis of the role of courts in three policy domains: the management of disputes; criminal punishment; and implementation of social and institutional reform. We will subsequently explore those elements that distinguish courts from other political institutions through an examination of the nature of judicial reasoning and the choices and constraints that shape decisionmaking in this context. The term will conclude with a discussion of the origins and consequences of cross-national differences in the propensity of citizens and interest groups to take their disputes to court.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 002 – Comparing the Politics of Developed Democracies.

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/460/002.nsf

This course examines the politics of developed democracies: i.e., those where day-to-day political struggle occurs within the boundaries defined by broadly unchallenged commitments to relatively free-market capitalism and relatively liberal democracy. This is not a course in current or past events in these countries. Rather we analyze certain systematic, (social) scientific regularities evidenced in the politics of advanced capitalist democracies. In this positive (non-normative) analysis, the focus is on political parties, elections, patterns of participation and of political conflict, public policy, and political economy. Course grades will be based upon short-paper writing, a final examination, and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 003 – Government & Politics of Japan.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/460/003.nsf

Japan is an ever-more interesting country to study, due both to its obvious importance, and to the fact that it is the only post-industrial non-western country. This course offers an overview of contemporary Japanese politics, designed for students with a general interest in Japan as well as political science concentrators. Special attention is given to how politics has affected and been affected by cultural patterns, social organization, economic growth, and Japan's position in the world. Grading will be by examination and short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 004 – International Security Affairs.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/460/004.nsf

In this course the subjects addressed will be divided into two broad areas. First, U.S. arms control and nuclear weapons policies will be examined with a focus on the proliferation of nuclear weapons, ballistic missile defense, and nuclear arms control with Russia. Second, the international politics of civil wars will be studied with a focus on the causes of civil war, when outside intervention is expected, and what impact outside intervention has on civil wars. Readings will focus on basic research on each of these topics while lectures will supplement the readings by considering how current international events and U.S. foreign policy behavior compare with the findings of more basic research. Grades will be based on written in-class exams and a research paper written over the course of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 005 – Politics of Change in the Developing World.

Instructor(s): Ashutosh Varshney (varshney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/460/005.nsf

This course will have a double purpose. It will cover some of the key conceptions of political development and explore how such large scale transformations affect other sectors of national life. Moreover, the course will review briefly how national development and the resulting mobilization of resources will affect the structure of international power. The method of instruction will be lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 006 – Politics of the European Union.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we seek to understand the historical development, political institutions, and philosophical underpinnings of the European Union. Topics will include federalism, different notions of sovereignty, studies of contemporary decision-making in the Union, and assessments of democratic institutions in Europe. Prominent points of debate, such as monetary union, trade policies, environmental policies, enlargement policies, and defense policies, will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to the contemporary debates on changes to the decision-making institutions in the Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 006 – Politics of European Union.

Instructor(s): Kollman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/486/001.nsf

This course will cover the history of the American party system, with a special emphasis on the state of Michigan. Beginning with the pre-Civil War period, the readings and lectures will treat the shifts in public opinion that give rise to new popular movements and pressure groups, which then modify or destroy the contemporary party system. The course will be taught with a research emphasis. Several computer-based assignments will introduce students to the historical study of electoral politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of eight credits. POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term with a supervising faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 493. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/493/001.nsf

This is a seminar for seniors who are working on honors theses. Students must be admitted to the honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 – Philosophy of the Law and Legal Reasoning.

Instructor(s): Jennet Kirkpatrick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/495/001.nsf

This course is a philosophical examination of the structure and functions of the law in a democracy. It investigates central issues of political and democratic theory, and builds on an introductory knowledge of theoretical methods and concepts. The course asks three questions:

  1. How should the law and legal institutions function in a democracy?
  2. What balance is to be drawn between law and morality?
  3. How should political actors inside and outside of the government interpret the law and reason within it?

These questions are explored through readings in natural law theory, legal positivism, critical race theory, and feminist jurisprudence. Discussions and assignments focus on elucidating theoretical concepts from assigned texts and on evaluating theoretical frameworks in light of practical controversies within the law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 001 – Are Americans Good Citizens?

Instructor(s): Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/496/001.nsf

How well do Americans live up to expectations for citizens in a democracy? We begin by considering a range of perspectives from political theory on what democracy demands of citizens. Then we review evidence on the actual political behavior of Americans to see how they compare to expectations. We conclude by discussing alternative responses to gaps between reality and ideals - citizenship education, institutional reform, revised standards, or cynicism. Topics covered include political knowledge, participation, deliberation, democratic values, tolerance, and the evaluation of policies and political leaders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 002 – Politics of Higher Education.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/496/002.nsf

The objectives of this seminar are to frame and analyze pressing political issues facing higher education in the United States today, to understand their historical evolution, and to project how these issues may affect universities of the future. The course begins by considering the external political environment of the U.S. research university: public perceptions of and pressures on higher education, sources of revenue and relationships with state and federal governments. Next we consider the internal political environment of universities: the allocation of resources across priorities, definitions of fields of study and service to various constituencies. Then, we focus on several specific domains and the external and internal politics of each: the health center, intercollegiate athletics and affirmative action. The course concludes with a look into the future of higher education.

Requirements for the course include weekly readings, attendance and participation in seminar discussions, one or more short discussion papers, participation in a group briefing on an assigned topic, and a substantial paper on an original research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 003 – The Presidency.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an inquiry into the origins, structure, and operation of the modern American presidency. Its purpose is to familiarize students with the concepts and issues at the center of contemporary political science scholarship on the presidency. Three normative concerns broadly guide the organization of this course. First, generally speaking, do Americans get the kind of president they want? Put differently, what are the qualities we expect our presidents to possess in office and how successfully do our electoral institutions select for such individuals? Second, what are the determinants of effective presidential leadership? That is to say, why are some presidents more successful than others at exerting their influence over the governing process? And third, what is the proper role of the presidency in the contemporary American political system? Are the powers of the presidency adequate to the tasks expected of presidents? Does the growth of presidential power present a challenge to traditional notions of republican government? We will begin with an examination of the constitutional origins of the presidency. What role did the Framers intend the president to play in the American political system, and to what extent did the early presidency conform to these expectations? Subsequent weeks will focus on the nature of the modern presidency. Topics will include presidential selection, the elements of presidential power and authority, the presidency and the party system, and the institutional presidency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 004 – Racial Politics in the US.

Instructor(s): Cara J Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a seminar on racial and ethnic politics in the U.S., focusing primarily on African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Whites. It focuses on how racial and ethnic groups shape and are shaped by the American political system, keeping in mind the changes and continuities over time. Among the topics to be covered include the meaning of race and ethnicity, the history of racial and immigration politics and policies, prejudice, group participation and mobilization, political representation, and public opinion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 001 – Politics of Economic Development.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/497/001.nsf

How does politics influence the pattern of economic development and vice versa? In this course we examine four modalities of political economy: democratic corporatism in Western Europe, neoliberalism in the United States and United Kingdom, developmentalism in much of industrializing East Asia, and what might be called "clientilistic" neoliberalism in Latin America. We will think of these modalities as ensembles or complex mosaics consisting of interlocking legal, social, political, and economic institutions. How, in these political economies, do legal institutions provide stability and legitimacy? What are the relationships between institutions of governance and representation? How are the corporations governed? What are the relationships between the state and big business? What do institutions of labor and social policy look like, and why?

Requirements: Active participation in class, and a twenty to thirty page-long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 002 – Contemporary German Politics.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course in Contemporary German Politics. Please see the Political Science website http://polisci.lsa.umich.edu/ for more information about course and professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 003 – Canadian Politics.

Instructor(s): Stephen Brooks (sabrooks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

There are three important reasons for Americans to study Canadian politics. Seymour Martin Lipset, much of whose career has been devoted to understanding the variations between Canada and the United States, argues that the study of Canada – the other country produced by the American Revolution – provides crucial insights into the nature of American politics. North America is, he has long argued, the ideal laboratory for students of comparative politics, allowing one to compare two societies that resemble each other enormously in terms of language, economics, culture, and shared history, but whose politics are different in significant ways. The study of Canadian politics helps Americans to better understand their own political system, providing a perspective that is not available to those whose knowledge and understanding of America have never been challenged by comparison to the society most like their own, but which has remained stubbornly different for well over two centuries since their common history as British colonies.

The second reason is the huge and undeniable importance of Canada to the United States. Canada – not Mexico, China, or Japan – is America's largest trading partner. Total U.S. trade with Canada is almost as great as that between the U.S. and Mexico and Japan combined. Trade with Canada is about four times as great as U.S. trade with China. Beyond the economic intimacy between Canada and the U.S., whose economies have been formally integrated in many ways since the Free Trade Agreement of 1989, there is also a personal intimacy. How many people know that Canada is the sixth largest country of origin for immigrants to the U.S. since the early 1800s; the third ranking country for foreign-born Americans; the second most important source of temporary workers in the U.S.; and the fourth largest source of illegal aliens?

The third reason is the sheer glamour and pizzaz of Canada. Stereotypes aside, can a country that has given America and the world Mike Myers, Jim Carrey, Pamela Anderson, Neil Young, and Peter Jennings really be such a dull place?

This course will examine the politics and government of America's largest trading partner. It will cover all of the essential elements of the Canadian political system, including political culture, the constitution, parties and elections, interest groups, and the media, from a perspective that constantly asks how and why these features of the Canadian political scene are similar to or different from what one finds in the United States.

The format for classes will be centered around discussion of assigned readings (about 30-40 pages per week) and several videos that will be shown from time to time. I will invite Canada's longest-serving member of Parliament and current cabinet minister, Herb Gray from Windsor, to visit the class sometime during the term. Andrew Malcolm, member of the editiorial board of the Los Angeles Times and author of The Canadians, has agreed to participate in a conference call with the class at some point in the term.

This course should provide good preparation for those students who subsequently register in the Ottawa internship course offered by the Department of Political Science. Intent to apply for the internship is not, of course, a necessary condition for registering in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 001 – Terrorism and Proliferation.

Instructor(s): Raymond Tanter (rtanter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rtanter/ps498,%20fall%202002,%202%20sep%2002.htm

The seminar draws on social science literature to explain why international terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) abound in the post-Cold War era. On the theoretical side, the course uses "bounded" rational choice and prospect theory to shed light on why "rogue leaders" engage in terrorism and proliferation in the face of deterrent and coercive threats intended to induce them from taking such actions.

At issue is the extent to which rogue leaders are more or less rational actors that seek to maximize expected gains and minimize expected losses (rational choice theory), or whether avoidance of loss is more important than obtaining gains (prospect theory).

Unable to match the conventional firepower of strong states, weak actors have an incentive to acquire and proliferate WMD and missile means of delivery. As a tool of weak states, WMD and missiles offer weak nations a way to threaten and hold hostage in crises involving third countries those powerful states that lack missile defense. In a crisis between Iraq and Israel, Washington might be constrained from intervention on the side of Israel if Baghdad had nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of reaching the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 002 – Intelligence & Forecasting Foreign Politics.

Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When a country experiences any sort of set back in the foreign policy sector, the explanation is often "intelligence failure". This is not to suggest that those who constitute the foreign policy establishment are mentally challenged, but rather that they had made some incorrect predictions or perhaps none at all. While estimating the capabilities and the intentions of other states - and non-state actors - in the global system is a central function of the intelligence community, we need to address other purposes as well. Among these are counter-intelligence, espionage, and counter-espionage, meaning the need to identify and nullify efforts of foreign actors to access the host nation's military, diplomatic, and industrial secrets. The course will, after this general overview, shift its focus to the foreign policy prediction role. We will examine the range of strategies used by the intelligence agencies to predict the behaviors and capabilities of other actors in the system, largely from the U.S. perspective. Central will be the successes and failures of the U.S. establishment compared to what was, or might have been, the performance of other agencies using alternative methods of prediction. In other words, why are our intelligence failures so frequent?

Students must submit two writing samples, unofficial transcript, and resume in hardcopy form to Professor Singer for permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 003 – International Human Rights Law

Instructor(s): Eleni Eleftheriou

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/498/003.nsf

The central focus of this course will be the relationship between international human rights law and state sovereignty. We will explore the dynamics of this relationship and how international human rights law has developed since the Nuremburg trials. Significant attention will be given to the controversy over the newly established international criminal court, and how the scope of this court differs from the ad hoc criminal tribunals. Students will be required to write 20-25 page research paper on a topic relevant to the course. Prior course in World Politics required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 499. Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark A Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the logic and method of quantitative data-based research in political science. It is concerned with the construction of empirical representations of political theories and the rigorous testing of these theories. More specifically, emphasis is placed on the formulation of hypotheses that seek to account for variance in politically relevant phenomena and on the use of quantitative data to test the accuracy, completeness, and locus of applicability of these hypotheses. Sections of the course will deal with aspects of data collection, measurement, causal inference, and introductory statistics. The course will also introduce students to software programs used in data analysis. This course is restricted to juniors and seniors. No background in statistics is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 585.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available at 611 Church Street, Suite 334.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available at 611 Church Street, Suite 334.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


Page


This page was created at 7:56 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2002 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.