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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 7:58 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Veinott (veinott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/111/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of psychology. As a discipline, Psychology is concerned with questions that make up the very fabric of our existence. From the mundane (e.g., Why can't I remember the names of people I meet?) to the profound (e.g., How do we know what behavior is "normal"?). There are three major goals for the course: (1) Introduce you to the ways that psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior. One of the main themes of the course is that different kinds of psychologists (e.g., biological, cognitive, social, clinical, etc.) approach psychology from different, but complementary, perspectives. (2) Introduce you to the body of knowledge, research findings, and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) Stimulate you to think about how the material we cover in class applies to your daily life. Psychology offers a unique perspective on many of the questions and social issues that confront us. There are no prerequisites for this course and it consists of two lectures and one discussion section a week. Grades are based on scores from three exams, four short written assignments, and performance in weekly discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Shelly Schreier (schreier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/111/030.nsf

This is a broad survey class exploring the various theoretical bases for the understanding of human behavior. The multiple disciplines comprising the psychological literature will be presented throughout the course and students will be expected to identify the strengths and limitations associated with these theories. Students will explore the biological processes of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory as well as the theories of personality, cognitive and social development. The impact of cultural influences on development will also be presented throughout the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 060.

Instructor(s): Ann Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/111/060.nsf

This course is a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover many topics, including perception, the nervous system, learning and memory, psychological development, intelligence, personality, and psychopathology. This particular section of 111 is a lecture only format. This means class will meet twice a week for a two hour lecture each time. This is a very large class without sections and students are encouraged to have an independent learning style since there are no small GSI led sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 112. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 114, 115, or 116. (4). (NS). (BS). PSYCH 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/112/001.nsf

The course provides an overview of the field of psychology from a natural science perspective, with emphasis on the connection between brain mechanism and behavior. The topics covered by the course are: Brain and Nervous System, Neuron and Neurotransmission, Perception, Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Development, Aphasia and Amnesia, Sleep and Hypnosis, EEG, Emotion, Conditioning, Reinforcement, and Motivation, Attachment, Personality, and Defense Mechanisms, Mental Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. It is hoped that the student will become more understanding of the neural basis of belief, desire, and action of individuals in the society. Students are evaluated based on grades on exams, reaction papers, possibly short quizzes, and activities in the discussion session. As the course draws heavily on materials from neuroscience and neuropsychology, student are expected to have some background in(or at least willing to learn) biology and chemistry. Discussion sessions will meet AFTER the first lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marita Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychology covers a tremendous variety of topics and that the approaches to studying these topics are equally numerous. In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics: Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely on a biological level (the brain, evolution and the biological basis of behavior, behavioral genetics), a "basic processes" level (exploring research on perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), on a level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally on a "social" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and intergroup processes.)

In Part 3, we will look at one specific problem, namely the student's transition from high school to college, and how this problem can be approached on a biological level (stress and infectious diseases), on a basic process level, on a level of looking at one person (the personality characteristics that might make an adjustment to a transition easier) and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to transitions in our life?).

Required text: Gleitman H., Fridlund, AJ & Reisberg D. Psychology. W.W. Norton Company. A course pack will also be available from Ulrich's

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Wilbert J McKeachie (billmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Psychology 114 surveys the field of psychology including such topics as biopsychology, cognition, motivation, personality, social psychology, developmental psychology, psychopathology, and research methods used by psychologists to gain a better understanding of human behavior and experience. The course requirements include (in addition to understanding a textbook) participation in class discussion, keeping a weekly journal of reading and observations, and carrying out a research project with other students. There will be occasional quizzes, a midterm, and final examination. After the second class students will be asked to choose a textbook from among two or three chosen by the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Culture and the Self: Do I and We Think, Feel and Understand the World Differently? 3 credits.

Instructor(s): Daphna R Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/001.nsf

This seminar provides an introduction to how social psychologists think about self-concept with particular attention to the consequences of self-concept for motivation, cognition, well-being and behavior and the ways that context and culture influences self-concept. What is "self-concept?" How have social psychologists studied its impact? Its content?
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1


PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 The Psychology of Negotiation & Conflict Management.

Instructor(s): Kim Leary (kimleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/002.nsf

This course will explore the psychology of negotiation, mediation and the dispute resolution in a variety of professional (i.e. business, diplomacy and clinical practice) as well as in personal contexts. Negotiation has traditionally been assumed to be a "zero-sum" game in which the winner takes all. Contemporary accounts stress that conflict is a social process in which the people in dispute shape the nature of the problem by the way that they talk about it as well as by how they interact with each other. Successful negotiations require joint problem solving where, at its best, the interests of all parties may be creatively represented in order to build lasting relationships and fair outcomes. The quality of those relationships depends on our ability to deal with differences and to manage conflict creatively. Over the semester, we build a set of theories about the narrative processes involved in negotiation and other forms of conversations that aim to be persuasive. We will specifically focus on the ways in which issues of self and identity are implicated in our efforts to communicate with one another. Our primary aim will be to look at the ways in which "difficult conversations" come to be transformed into occasions of effective talk. We will cover topics like the following: the role of persuasion in healing (i.e. psychotherapy and collaborative decision-making between physicians and their patients); the management of conflict in families, schools and in the workplace; negotiation in international and ethnic conflict; negotiation in the face of terrorism and the role of truth and reconciliation commissions as instances of reparative dialogues. Students should be prepared to engage in classroom activities that will include role-plays and other conversational simulations. Some of these will be videotaped and be discussed in the seminar. The course will enable students to be more reflective about everyday experiences of conflict and to become familiar with the concepts and skills associated with more formal efforts to resolve disputes in communities, schools and workplaces.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Psychology and Law.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt) as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's "A Time to Kill" ) with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1; If spaces open up for waitlisted students, the Professor will contact them individually to register.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 004 Twins and What they Teach Us.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/004.nsf

This seminar will focus on twinship. Throughout historical time, and across many cultures, twins have been the source of much fascination. In literature, they have served as a metaphor to explore identity, good vs. evil, multiple life options, symmetry, and soul mates, and in science, they have been used to disentangle genetic and environmental influences on health and behavior. In order to gain an understanding of the experience, influences, and impact of twinship, we will examine literature and films that have used twins, interview twins, and parents, siblings, and spouses of twins, and consider theory and research on the biology and psychology of twins, and on changes related to the recent increased incidence of twinning.

A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with weekly reading and written assignments. In addition, there will be several group projects and a final exam. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 The Psychology and Culture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Motherhood.

Instructor(s): Ann M Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/006.nsf

This course will explore psychological issues surrounding women's transition to motherhood. Cultural attitudes towards pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and related topics will be contrasted. In addition, the impact of technology on fertility and pregnancy will be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 007 Justice for all? Difference and Oppression in U.S. Society. Meets with CAAS 103.001.

Instructor(s): Kelly Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/007.nsf

This introductory seminar course will examine identity development and oppression as we challenge ourselves to think critically about our social identities and worldviews. Social or group identities include for example, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. These identities are predicated upon a social structural system that advantages some groups and disadvantages others. As such, this course will also explore how inequities in our multicultural and multiethnic U.S. society impact identity development and relationships between groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 008 The Future of Work and Your Work Future.

Instructor(s): Richard H Price (ricprice@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to help students explore their future career goals and, at the same time, reflect on the future of work. Our emphasis will be on active learning and exploration. We will read, discuss, conduct small research projects, and work both individually and in teams. In the first part of the course, we learn what writers, psychologists, and experts on work and careers have to say about the psychological meaning of work, how you will cope with challenges, shape your future self, and choose your future work.

Next, we look to the future where emerging technology, rapid globalization, and cultural differences will play a major role in shaping working life. The authors we read ask whether work as we know it will disappear, how it will cross national boundaries, and if we can bridge the gap between dramatically different cultures in the global work of the future.

Then we ask how these global, technological, and cultural forces will actually shape future work. What is likely to happen to jobs and careers, and to the work organizations of the future? How will we experience the work itself, and how will the growing diversity of the workforce influence work and organizations?

Finally, how will the new work influence our values, our sense of family, and our sense of community? In the last part of the course, students will work in teams on small research projects that explore a topic of their own choosing on the future of work. This course will use a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Psychology and Non-ordinary Experience.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions.

However, it is only recently that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. Lastly, we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 011 I, Too, Sing America: Psychology & Cultural Diversity.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/120/011.nsf

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 014 Health and Healing: Mind and Body.

Instructor(s): J Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore conceptions of health and healing within a broad range of traditions, from conventional allopathic medicine to shamanism. We will study the mind/body relation within these traditions as well as consider current scientific studies that elucidate how the mind-body connection impacts on health. This seminar will encourage a broadening of our conception of health to include physical, mental as well as spiritual well-being. Students will examine their personal beliefs and understanding of health as well as study the influence of culture on medical practices. Other topics will include stress, pain, addiction, and depression. Grades will be based on short written assignments, class participation, and a small self-designed project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 The Evolution of Consciousness.

Instructor(s): David Meyer (demeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Interdisciplinary seminar will explore the nature of conscious and unconscious mental processes in various types of human cognition and action, including perception, memory, thinking, and behavior broadly construed. We will take an eclectic approach in our exploration, encompassing points of view found in disciplines such as psychology, neurophysiology, artificial intelligence, philosophy, and medical practice. Both normal and altered states of consciousness (e.g., sleep, dreaming, meditation, hypnosis, and hallucination) will be considered from these perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 002 Psychology of Intelligence.

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The study of intelligence has a long history which has been filled with excitement, debate, and controversy. In this seminar, we will closely examine some of the major issues and controversies in the study of intelligence. We will discuss questions such as: How do we define intelligence? How can it be measured? Why are there individual differences of intelligence? What are the roles of genes, culture, and environment? What can we learn about intelligence by studying extreme cases such as "geniuses" or "savants"? Can intelligence be increased? How does the "intelligence" of other animals compare to our own? Grades in this course will be based on writing assignments, tests and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Mich. Union.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological, and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS COURSE MUST FILL OUT A PLACEMENT FORM AT WWW.UMICH.EDU/~IGRC (IN ADDITION TO REGULAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURES). DUE TO HIGH DEMAND, STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE MASS MEETING ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS WILL BE WITHDRAWN FROM THE COURSE.

Required text: Adams, Blumenfeld, Castaneda, Hackman, Peters, Zuniga. (Eds.). (2000). Readings for Diversity and Social Justice. New York: Routledge. A course pack will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 010 Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Mich. Union.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS COURSE MUST FILL OUT A PLACEMENT FORM AT WWW.UMICH.EDU/~IGRC (IN ADDITION TO REGULAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURES). DUE TO HIGH DEMAND, STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE MASS MEETING ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS WILL BE WITHDRAWN FROM THE COURSE.

Required text: Adams, Blumenfeld, Castaneda, Hackman, Peters, Zuniga. (Eds.). (2000). Readings for Diversity and Social Justice. New York: Routledge. A coursepack will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Project Outreach.

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected though PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions. The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion. Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Psychology Undergraduate office in 1343 East Hall to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Fall 2002 Term. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 - Working with Preschool Children: Students will work at a placement with infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children. The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. This course will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture.

Section 002 - Big Sibs: Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood.

Section 003 - Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice: Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.

http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/211/003.nsf

Section 005 - Health, Illness, and Society: Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 006 - Exploring Careers: Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/211/006.nsf

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 230(330). Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent C Berridge (berridge@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/230/001.nsf

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology. It introduces the kinds of questions traditionally addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is the study of how psychological processes relate to the brain and to evolution. A major focus is on how brain processes cause psychological events and behavior, and how psychological events are encoded in the brain (physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience). Another focus is on how psychological processes (e.g., perception, cognition) differ across different species, and on how psychological processes have been shaped by evolutionary pressures (comparative or evolutionary psychology). Topics will include: principles of behavioral evolution that have shaped current behavior and physiological processes; the anatomy and operation of brain systems relevant to mind and behavior, and their relation to psychoactive drugs; neural mechanisms of normal action, perception, motivation, learning, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and for one discussion/practicum section. NOTE: This course is intended primarily for sophomores and second-term first-year students who have ALREADY taken a course in introductory psychology. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 231 / UC 261. Brain, Learning, and Memory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Maren (maren@umich.edu), John Jonides (jjonides@umich.edu), Hylan Moises (moises@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students. (4). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology (as a social science), but may be included in a concentration plan in Biopsychology and Cognitive Science.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/230/001.nsf

See University Courses 261.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 240(340). Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001 Evening exams from 6:00-8:00 pm on Tue., Oct. 8 and Tue., Nov 12.

Instructor(s): Thad A Polk (tpolk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/340/001.nsf

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation.

Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises. The textbook for this course is Sternberg, R.J. (2003); Cognitive Psychology (3rd Edition), Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 241 / CDB 264 / UC 264 / PHYSICS 264. Introduction to Sensory Systems: Sound, Hearing, and Deafness.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kate Barald (kfbarald@umich.edu), John Middlebrooks (jmidd@umich.edu), Karl Grosh (grosh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/engr/195/056.nsf

See University Courses 264.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 250(350). Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): L Monique Ward (ward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/250/001.nsf

This course provides an overview of the milestones of human development from conception to death. We examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of children, adolescents, and adults, and the various factors (e.g. genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development. Our goal is to give you an initial introduction to the main issues, central theories, and dominant research methods in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. We will also discuss the implications of course content for child-rearing, education, and social policy so that you can apply your knowledge to meaningful problems. Requirements include three multiple-choice exams, two papers, and section attendance and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 260(360). Introduction to Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret J Shih (mjshih@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/260/001.nsf

Organizational psychology is the subfield of psychology devoted to the human behavior in organizations. This course offers a broad-ranging introduction to the field focusing particularly on the problems of understanding behavior that is in some respects governed by psychological principles and laws and in some respects by sociological principles and laws. Topics in the course include individuation and socialization, motivation in organizations, group psychology, sociology, role relations, organizational dynamics, and problems of management. The course will consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, and group work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 270(370). Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward C Chang (changec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Abnormal psychology entails the scientific study of aberrant behaviors, broadly defined. However, there is no universal consensus on the definition, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. As we shall quickly see, what is deemed abnormal and how it develops or is treated will partly depend on the particular perspective taken. Hence, a key goal of this course is to guide students toward a broad and critical understanding of "abnormal behavior" from a number of different perspectives. We will accomplish this by exploring, evaluating, and discussing various strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives for understanding psychology based on the theoretical and empirical literature. Films may be used to illustrate some of the important concepts mentioned in the lectures and in the readings.

Your final grade will be based on the total number of points you obtain from regular quizzes and exams. Note, it is the student's responsibility to be in attendance for all lecture classes. Quizzes, which are given at the start of class, cannot be made up for any reason, and will be given starting the second lecture class. (Therefore, students who interested in taking this course should make sure to attend all lecture classes, including the first day of class.) Students who are late or who do not attend lectures risk missing quizzes and exams. Missing lectures, quizzes, and exams will have a direct impact on your final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3; Once the course fills, contact the Professor for an override.

PSYCH 270(370). Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): James H Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/270/010.nsf

This is an introductory overview of abnormal Psychology. There will be a two hour lecture and two hour discussion section per week. Grades will be based on in class exams and section assignments. Comer's Abnormal Psychology (fourth edition) will be the primary text, supplemented by a course pack available at Ulrich's. Further information about the course can be found through Coursetools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 280(380). Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001 Evening exams from 6:00-8:00 on Wed., Oct. 2, Mon., Nov. 4, and Wed., Dec. 11.

Instructor(s): Barbara L Fredrickson (blf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/280/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such topics as: social inference, schemas, attribution, conformity and obedience, altruism, emotions, stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, and attitudes and persuasion. Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through short papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 290(390). Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Veronica Benet-Martinez (veronica@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/290/001.nsf

This course is intended to be a general overview of the contemporary study of personality and its theoretical background. Great emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with current research and theory on specific personality topics. Examples of some of the topics covered in this course are: personality research methods and assessment; biological and environmental determinants of personality; psychoanalytic theory; learning theory; units of personality (traits, motives, and cognitions); personality development, emotion and coping; and culture and personality.

Examinations: Three equally-weighted one-hour exams will be given. Each exam will cover lectures AND readings (textbook and article assignments) for the period prior to the exam. Format for the exams will be a combination of short-answer and multiple-choice questions. The exams will be given during class time

Other requirements: In addition to the three exams, three writing assignments will be given. These assignments, which will involve applying what you have learned in class to a real case of personality assessment/description (assignments will be given in section or class and will always be due one week after they are assigned). Furthermore, each week, you will be expected to attend your corresponding discussion session and participate in it actively(see your section syllabus for info about requirements such as weekly submission of questions/comments based on the material, quizzes, presentations, etc.). Finally, if you want to boost your grade, you will have the option of writing a short extra-credit paper (max. 10 pages; 8% weight). The topic of the paper needs to be pre-approved by the GSI and has to be on some hot current issue related to personality that you find interesting (e.g., to what extent are school-shootings rooted in environmental causes like media exposure versus the perpetrator's own personality? Is the multiple-personality disorder for real? What is emotional intelligence? etc.).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 302. Special Problems Lab in Psychology/Natural Science.

Section 001 Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230 or 240. (3-4). (Excl). (BS). May be used as a lab in the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration with advisor approval. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/302/001.nsf

This computer-based laboratory course focuses on several research paradigms in biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience. With the help of computer-based simulations, students will be introduced to neuronal electrophysiology, neural network modeling, simple learning paradigms and behavioral psychology. Through hands-on experience with these topics, students will gain practical knowledge about research design and methodology, data analysis, and the written preparation of research findings. Grading will be based upon in-class laboratory exercises as well as written lab reports, research papers, and examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 303. Special Problems in Psychology: Advanced Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel Sommers (ssommers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (2-4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/303/001.nsf

This course, offered for the first time in the Fall 2002 term, satisfies a methods lab requirement. A previous statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended. In this course you will learn how research is conducted across the different areas of psychology (e.g., social, developmental, clinical, etc.), and will also have the opportunity to conduct your own research on topics that you find interesting. This course is a pilot section for a new department-wide methods requirement currently under development, so your participation and input in PSYCH 303 will help shape the future of the methods lab requirement in psychology. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ellen J Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Monique A Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Wilbert J McKeachie (billmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Patricia Y Gurin (gurin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 Michigan Mentorship Program. (3-4 credits). Interested students must attend a general informational meeting in order to apply to the program. Contact Dr. Quart at equart@umich.edu for dates & times of the meetings.

Instructor(s): Ellen J Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor; overrides will be issued after the application process

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 003 Child Care Practicum at Pound House. (2-4 credits). Contact Carolyn Tyson (998-8399) for application information.

Instructor(s): Brenda L Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper. Students will meet in seminar, weekly (Tuesday or Wednesday evening) to discuss relevant issues. Students must have Junior standing. Admission is by application only; contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House, 998-8399 or cwtyson@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 005 Tutoring Reading in Schools. (2-4 credits).

Instructor(s): Scott G Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools. We pair college students with elementary school students in order to help students develop appropriate academic skills strategies. The course will help children become more successful and motivated in school. University students will gain knowledge about children and elementary schools. College students are expected to participate in mentoring for 3 hours per credit hour received per week. This means about 6 hours of tutoring for 2 credits. Students will read some background information and write a 5 page paper. Students will meet Wednesdays from 4:00-5:00 pm to discuss relevant issues. Students must have Junior standing, a car, open time blocks between 9:00-3:00 on several days of the week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In the Community Setting, II. (3 credits). Contact Dr. Heather Flynn (hflynn@umich.edu or 615-6060) for registration information.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu), Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Division of Substance Abuse (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/umarc/splash.html) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide a continuing opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c)a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, PSYCH 211, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

A coursepack will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Section 001 Classroom placements are arranged in four-hour blocks from 8:00-12noon or 12:30-4:30pm Mon, Wed, AND Fri or Tue AND Thur. For registration information call 647-6886 or email Karey at karey@umich.edu.

Instructor(s): Karey L Leach (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (3-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of seven credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.childrenscenters.umich.edu/

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with children ages 18 months through kindergarten in the UM Children's Centers laboratory preschool programs on campus. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations). This practicum meets laboratory requirements. A lecture relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held bi-weekly. A course pack (under $30) accompanies the lectures, along with several brief written assignments. There is a meeting between the Head Teacher and student at midterm and final designed to guide and reflect the classroom experience and the students growth and development in their interactions with children.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor; Contact Jamilaj@umich.edu for further information.

PSYCH 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 Applications are due to the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall, by Wednesday, April 3, 2002.

Instructor(s): Maria L Slowiaczek (mls@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/ugo/page.asp?id=32

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising. Students are selected through an application and interview process. Applications are available in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall.

Students are required to work 3-4 hours as peer advisors in the Undergraduate Office, as well as to attend a weekly, two hour class on Wednesdays from 4:00-6:00. A required training in peer facilitation and the psychology concentration is scheduled on the first two sundays after classes begin.

Other requirements include weekly readings, reaction papers, accountability logs of peer advising work and a final project. In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The course is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor; Override by application and interview.

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Kelly Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/310/001.nsf

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 311 / SOC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

This practicum follows Psychology 310/Soc 320 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.umich.edu/~igrc for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

PSYCH 315 / CAAS 327. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Section 001 Social Psychology of the African Family.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 327.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 319 / AMCULT 319. Empowering Families and Communities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 320. (3). (Excl). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to teach students the process of family and community empowerment with didactic and experiential coursework as well as practical community fieldwork. Students will meet as a class, one day a week. Students will choose a Detroit area field placement. The class is structured as follows: the first half of the class period will be devoted to class discussion of specific topics augmented by readings, experiential exercises, guest speakers and videos; the second half of the class period will be devoted to discussions related to fieldwork. Students will be expected to discuss issues specific to their placement and to incorporate ideas from didactic materials with their field experiences. The 3-credit grade for this course is based on three components; the midterm paper, the final project and class attendance and participation. The one-credit grade for the Community Intervention Lab (Psych 320) is based on three components; field placement attendance, transportation responsibility, and the field placement journals.

Required text: Reaching Out to Children and Families: Students Model Effective Community Service. Author: Michelle R. Dunlap / Publisher: Rowan & Littlefield. A coursepack is also required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 320 / AMCULT 320. Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 319. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to teach students the process of family and community empowerment with didactic and experiential coursework as well as practical community fieldwork. Students will meet as a class, one day a week. Students will choose a Detroit area field placement. The class is structured as follows: the first half of the class period will be devoted to class discussion of specific topics augmented by readings, experiential exercises, guest speakers and videos; the second half of the class period will be devoted to discussions related to fieldwork. Students will be expected to discuss issues specific to their placement and to incorporate ideas from didactic materials with their field experiences. The one-credit grade for this course is based on three components; field placement attendance, transportation responsibility, and the field placement journals. The 3-credit grade for Psych 319 is based on three components; the midterm paper, the final project and class attendance and participation.

Required text: Reaching Out to Children and Families: Students Model Effective Community Service. Author: Michelle R. Dunlap / Publisher: Rowan & Littlefield. A coursepack is also required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 322(408). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits do not count toward the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322 and 323. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 323(409). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be used toward the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 328. Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 322 or 422). (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 329. Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 323 or 423). (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary Ten Eyck (teneyck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/331/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) It provides students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the biopsychology program with his/her on-going research. (2) It introduces students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior). (3) It provides practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists in laboratory research. Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall). Students concentrating in 'Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences' will receive priority.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 338(437) / ANTHRBIO 368. Primate Social Behavior I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrbio/368/001.nsf

See Biological Anthropology 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001, 002, 003.

Instructor(s): Shane Mueller (smueller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/341/001.nsf

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research.

The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 345. Introduction to Human Neuropsychology.

Section 001 Evening exam from 7:00-9:00 on Wed., Oct. 16.

Instructor(s): Patricia A Reuter-Lorenz (parl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 634. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/345/001.nsf

This course surveys current knowledge of the human brain and its role in mental processes, such as perception, attention, thought, language, emotion, and memory. Case studies will be used to learn about the effects of brain surgery, head injury, stroke, and dementing illnesses. Evaluation is based on four exams and a series of short assignments.

Required text: (1) Fractured Minds; (2) TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 349 / LING 347. Talking Minds.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least one of: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115, or LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/349/001.nsf

See Linguistics 347.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer T Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The course is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement.

Required text: Methods in Behavioral Research (7th edition) by Paul C. Cozby.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 352(451) / LING 352. Development of Language and Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan A Gelman (gelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/352/001.nsf

This course will examine how children acquire their first language, from babbling and first words through complex grammar. Topics include: word meanings, syntactic development, pragmatics, relations between language and thought, influence of parental input, second-language acquisition, critical periods in development, and more. We will discuss major theoretical approaches as well as a variety of current research evidence. The course is a lecture format, but with the small class size discussion will be encouraged. Requirements: three exams and a term project.

Required text: Language Development (2nd. edition) by Erika Hoff. A coursepack with additional readings will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 359(459). Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/359/001.nsf

This undergraduate course is designed to familiarize students with current knowledge about the constancies and changes that occur across adulthood, as well as with conceptual and research issues relevant to understanding the future of aging. Discussions will focus on plasticity of the aging process, and likely causes of age differences and age change. Our goal will be to understand the implications of age patterns for individuals, as well as for societies. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the typical, as well as range of possible, trajectories of adult development and aging. They should gain insights about the changes they can expect as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain understanding of the needs of older persons, as well as an appreciation of the tremendous potential resource they offer.

The course will cover theory, methods, data, and controversies relevant to age in adulthood. We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S. today, including discussions of attitudes about aging, and demographics of it. Then we will consider theories about aging, and methods of studying it. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be covered include changes in: physical capacities, health, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, creativity, wisdom, personality, emotion, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address societal issues, including gender, ethnic, cultural, and historical diversity in aging, services, policies, and careers relevant to the old.

A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with weekly readings and written assignments. In addition, there will be several short reports, group projects, exams, and final. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Sections 001 and 002 satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Brown (stebrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/361/001.nsf

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed:

  1. to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience;
  2. to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g. field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and
  3. to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/371/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on psychopathology. Lectures will cover research design, current studies in clinical psychology, methods of assessing psychiatric symptoms and disorders, and research tools for evaluating psychotherapy outcomes. Lab sessions will encourage students to pursue an area of interest while learning how to design assessments, collect and analyze data, and report findings in a written report that meets APA guidelines. Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended.

The textbook that the class will use is "Research Methods in Clinical and Counselling Psychology."; Barker, C., Pistrang, N., & Elliott, R. (1994).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 Alcoholism & Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, I. Contact Dr. Heather Flynn (hflynn@umich.edu) about an interview and override.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu), Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Division of Substance Abuse and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include: (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involve the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c) a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening.

This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor; Contact Dr. Heather Flynn (hflynn@umich.edu) for interview and override information.

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section is designed for students with a strong interest in developmental disturbances/child psychopathology, actively considering graduate study in clinical child psychology or related disciplines. The exclusive course focus is research methods: various approaches to clinical child research (quantitative and qualitative, experimental, observational, epidemiological, case file, etc.), and key research design elements, (e.g., samples, measures, procedures). These will be studies as related to basic issues in clinical child psychology - diagnostic classification, sensitivity and specificity in screening, etiology, risk factors, efficacy of interventions, and follow-up studies. Course goals center on enhancing stuident capacities to design, conduct, and evaluate clinical child research.

Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended. Grades are determined by written excercises, exams, and a final, formal detailed research project proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 374(471). Marriage and the Family.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon Gold-Steinberg (sharongs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/374/001.nsf

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the psychological study of family systems. The course is divided into five major content areas: Historical and contemporary concepts of family; family developmental life cycles, highlighting stages of marital adjustment and child socialization; marital transitions; processes of family dysfunction, highlighting issues related to family violence; and models of family therapy. Both normative and deviant family processes will be studied, with an emphasis upon assessing and treating distressed families. Films and videos will be used to supplement lecture materials. Readings will include a text book as well as memoirs. Grading will be based on in-class exams which include a take-home essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sam Sommers (ssommers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/381/001.nsf

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. In the first half, students are introduced to different research methods and concepts and learn to analyze survey data they collect. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Wendy Treynor (wtreynor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/381/002.nsf

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. In the first half, students are introduced to different research methods and concepts and learn to analyze survey data they collect. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 290. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/391/001.nsf

This lab course aims at making students familiar with the process of research in personality psychology. Groups of students will read the literature on one of several optional topics in personality research formulate hypotheses, collect data, analyze these data using statistical methods, write an APA style research report, peer-review the research reports written by other students, and present their research in the form of a short talk in class. Students will be introduced to experimental, survey, and archival strategies of data collection and hypothesis testing, diverse instruments for the assessment of personality, and statistical approaches to analyzing data that involves measures of personality. Grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written research reports, and performance on a statistics test.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 290. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/391/001.nsf

This lab course aims at making students familiar with the process of research in personality psychology. Groups of students will read the literature on one of several optional topics in personality research formulate hypotheses, collect data, analyze these data using statistical methods, write an APA style research report, peer-review the research reports written by other students, and present their research in the form of a short talk in class. Students will be introduced to experimental, survey, and archival strategies of data collection and hypothesis testing, diverse instruments for the assessment of personality, and statistical approaches to analyzing data that involves measures of personality. Grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written research reports, and performance on a statistics test.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 393(490). Political Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David G Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/393/001.nsf

This course surveys the ways that psychological factors affect politics, and vice versa. After an initial analysis of psychology, gender, and politics, we consider leadership and war-versus-peace as two important topics involving both psychology and politics. We consider how to measure psychological characteristics of leaders and groups, who must be studied "at a distance" rather than directly. We then consider some psychological-political processes: political socialization and "generations;" political cognition; old and new ideologies; and voting and other links between the personal and the political. We conclude with political breakdowns (rebellion, terrorism, nationalism) and restoration (negotiation and mediation). Evaluation by exams and a paper. Lectures with discussion sections. A prior course or interest in history or political science is useful, though not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Middle School Girls and Research: Theory and Practice. (3 Credits). Meets with Education 547.002 and Women's Studies 483. 003.

Instructor(s): Pamela Trotman Reid (pamreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Health Psychology. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Robert M Sellers (rsellers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/401/010.nsf

The main objective of this introductory course is to provide the students with an introduction to the field of Health Psychology. The course covers such material as the biopsychosocial model of health, health maintenance, stress and coping, pain, and health promotion. Also, the course provides an introduction to some of the most interesting health psychology research and interventions that are being conducted at the University of Michigan. This course is taught as an interactive learning experience in which class participation is a major part. The course is divide into two sections. The first section consists of two hours of lecture each week in which students are introduced to the topics and issues related to the field of Health Psychology. A second section of the course consists of 1 hour each week of smaller group discussion of the weekly topics. Students will also participate in group projects designed to provide students with practical experience working as health psychologists. Students are expected to be prepared for every class meeting and are required to participate fully in all class activities. Student's grades will be based on two hourly examinations, a final exam, two group projects, as well as extra-credit quizzes in lecture. The course is designed for students who have taken at least one introductory course in psychology. Course readings are comprised of an introductory textbook and a small course pack of supplemental readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 015 Strategies for Effective Learning. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): John Hagen (jwhagen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to learn to apply well-documented principles of learning and study skills to their academic courses as well as other areas in their lives. The first step is a "dynamic assessment" in which the student is an active participant. The student decides on the areas in which the work will be focused for the term and how the areas will be applied to courses or academic concerns the student has. The student will choose a particular content area of special interest. A major part of the course is individualized, taking into account areas of skill development as well as exploration of new areas of special interest. Assignments include weekly reports, a series of brief written assignments, and a final paper. Students will meet in small groups as well as individually with instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 017 Native Amer Mental Health. (3 credits). Meets with American Culture 496.001.

Instructor(s): Joseph Gone (jgone@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This undergraduate seminar will examine the "mental health" issues of American Indian and Alaska Native communities in the twenty-first century United States. Foci of the course will include attention to the postcolonial tensions surrounding mental health research, policy, and practice; the cross-cultural challenges confronting mental health professionals and researchers in Native communities; and the political and institutional realities that characterize mental health service delivery for Indian people. A central dilemma considered throughout the course will be whether and how to properly enculturate "mental health" research, policy and practice in the context of postcolonial Native America. The seminar is designed for advanced undergraduates from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and pre-health professions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 018 Topic? Credits?

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 019 Transitions During Adolescence. (2 credits). Meets with Psych 458.001.

Instructor(s): Cortina

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 458.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 404. Field Practicum.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-5). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of five credits.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 361 Gender & Mentoring Technology. (3 Credits) Meets with WS 483.007.

Instructor(s): Abigail J Stewart (abbystew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-5). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of five credits.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.smartgirl.org/

This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender and technology and adolescent girls' development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the smartgirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the smartgirl.org project. This course will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender). The class will meet Mondays, 3:00-5:00 p.m., in Lane Hall G275, with 6 additional online hours to be arranged. This course is taught on a credit/no credit basis. Students can register for either Psychology 405-2 or Women's Studies 483-7 (this section will meet the WS practice requirement, but not the WS special topics requirement).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melissa Rae Peet (ijb@umich.edu), Orli Klier Avi-Yonah (oaviyona@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor; e-mail Prof. Mann (rdmann@umich.edu) for registration information.

PSYCH 420(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a natural science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 421(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a social science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor Required

PSYCH 422(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 423(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 424(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the development of a natural science research plan of a student's own design with the Honors Advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 425(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the development of a social science research plan of a student's own design with the Honors Advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 426(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 424 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 427(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 425 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 433. Biopsychology of Motivation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oliver C Schultheiss (oschult@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/433/001.nsf

This course will make students familiar with the biopsychological substrates of motivational processes in animals and humans. We will examine general motivational processes such as approach and avoidance, but also look at specific motivational systems such as hunger, sex, aggression, or attachment and their underlying brain circuitry. In addition, we will explore to what extent motivation and learning influence each other and whether motivation and goal-directed behavior can be conscious or nonconscious in humans. Students are expected to have a solid background knowledge in biopsychology (e.g., through Psychology 230). Their course grade will be determined on the basis of their attendance and participation, weekly short essay papers, and a final exam. The course will be taught as a mixture of student-moderated topic presentations, lecture, and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 439 / ANTHRBIO 468 / WOMENSTD 468. Behavioral Biology of Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: ANTHRBIO 161, 361, 368, PSYCH 335, EEB 494. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/439/001.nsf

What does it mean to be a woman? This interdisciplinary seminar approaches this question by beginning with an even more fundamental one: What does it mean to be female? The course will introduce students to recent and innovative research on women in the fields of psychology, biology, and anthropology. The course integrates three approaches to understanding modern women. One approach compares human females with females in other animals, especially primates, within the framework of evolutionary theory (natural selection). Such comparisons help to illuminate the evolutionary origins of universal aspects of human female behavioral biology, including, for example, female sexuality and mate choice, child-bearing and child-rearing, and competition and cooperation among women. A second approach examines the physiology underlying critical events in women's lives, including menstruation, fertility, conception, pregnancy, birth, lactation, motherhood, and menopause and aging. A third approach compares women's lives in different societies, to examine the effects of ecology and culture on many aspects of female behavior and physiology. By synthesizing concepts and evidence from these three approaches, we will be in better position to address critical modern issues like: Why do men tend to hold more political and economic power than women? What is the relationship between male economic and political power and male control of female sexuality and reproduction? What factors influence birth rate in different human populations? How do sexuality and social relations change as women age? Under what conditions do women tend to form close, cooperative bonds with other women? What strategies are most likely to empower women in their struggle for self-determination? Students will be encouraged to consider the relevance of course information for their own lives (e.g., in relation to birth control, eating disorders and body imagery, male violence against women, female sexuality, mate choice, women's friendships, women's rights). Course requirements include a substantial amount of reading, including scientific journal articles available online and three books (Natalie Angier, Woman: an Intimate Geography, Sarah Hardy, Mother Nature: a History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection, and Peter Ellison, On Fertile Ground: A Natural History of Human Reproduction). Grades will be based on participation in class discussion, quizzes on readings, several short essays, weekly journal entries on topics chosen by students, and a write-up of a life-history interview with an older woman of your choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 - Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/442/

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 40% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 60% of the grade). Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Readings

  • Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.
  • Hastorf, A. H. and Cantril, H."They saw a game: A case study." Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1954, 129-134. (CP)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5; Students who are waitlisted will be contacted by the Professor individually if a space opens up.

PSYCH 445 / LING 447. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/445/001.nsf

This course is designed to familiarize students with experimental research on the cognitive processes that underlie language comprehension and production in normal adults. The focus of the course is on word recognition, syntactic and semantic analysis, and discourse-level processing; language acquisition and speech perception will not be covered. Topics will include lexical and structural ambiguity resolution, models of parsing and sentence understanding, the role of discourse-level information, the planning and production of sentences, and the role of prosody/intonation. This course will be taught at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying linguistics, psychology or cognitive science. It is primarily a lecture course, with two exams. A textbook will be supplemented with relevant journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 449(542). Decision Processes.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 722.001

Instructor(s): J Frank Yates (jfyates@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in statistics is recommended but not required. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/449/001.nsf

Consider the following:

  • Should I take Psychology 449 or Art History 477?
  • I'm not really good at chemistry and things like that. My grades in those courses stink. So should I give up my dream of becoming a doctor?
  • Other companies are making tons of money selling sport utility vehicles. But they seem to have the market locked up. Besides, I have bad feelings about the pollution those things cause. Should we enter the SUV market anyway?
  • My client, Mr. Thomas, thinks that Consolidated is responsible for his injuries and thus he wants to sue them. Should I advise that he go through with that plan?
  • Floyd and I have been going together for several years, and now he wants to get married. Should I give in and marry him, despite my misgivings?
  • As alderman for the fifth ward, should I vote for this legislation that would change the zoning rules for the city?

Questions like these illustrate the kinds of decision problems people confront all the time, in their personal and professional lives. They provide the ultimate focus of Psychology 449, "Decision Processes." Specifically, my primary aims in this course are to help the student do two things: (a) achieve an understanding of how people individually and collectively actually solve decision problems; and (b) develop an understanding of how people including the student him- or herself could decide better than they would be inclined to decide naturally.

Should you elect Psychology 449? One consideration you should take into account is whether the aims described above fit with your interests. That is, do the aims excite you? Another consideration pertains to your future plans. Psychology 449 would be good preparation if your plans include either:

scholarship (e.g., in graduate school and thereafter) on basic processes in cognitive psychology, social psychology, organizational psychology, or related areas, e.g., political science, economics, marketing

or

professional practice (either immediately after college or after professional school) in areas where decision making is critical, e.g., business, law, health care, counseling, operations engineering.

How is Psychology 449 organized? The entire class meets twice a week, in 1-* hour "lecture" sessions. And on Fridays, each student attends either of two 1-hour discussion sessions. Psychology 449 is built around what I call the "cardinal decision issue perspective." This is a way of thinking about decision problems which focuses on things like what decisions are, what it ought to mean to say that a decision is "good" or "bad," and the kinds of questions that must be answered for virtually any decision problem that arises. The specific topics we will address are organized according to the categories distinguished in the cardinal issue perspective. One of my major goals is to have you develop a deep appreciation for that perspective since it can help you think through the problems you will face as a student of decision making and as a decision maker.

Our treatment of a given topic typically proceeds as follows: First, students do the reading for the given topic. Then, in the "lectures," the key questions surrounding the topic are illustrated through demonstrations or exercises in which all students participate actively. As the instructor, I offer a class-interactive presentation in which I introduce essential ideas not covered in the readings and integrate all we have seen on the topic, seeking to provide an integrated picture that makes sense to the student. The Friday discussion sessions are devoted primarily to active discussions of question lists provided for the readings and to tasks related to students' team projects.

The requirements of the course include:

  • attendance and active participation in class
  • exercises
  • a midterm and a final examination
  • a term project

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 457. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001 Moral Development.

Instructor(s): Joan Miller (jgmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/457/001.nsf

This course will be devoted to understanding the development of moral reasoning and moral behavior. We will consider different accounts of how morality develops, giving attention not only to psychological theory and research but also to relevant philosophical and anthropological work. Topics covered include such issues as age trends in moral judgment, sex differences, morality and emotion, socialization processes, cultural influences, moral exemplars, the prediction of moral action, and immoral behavior. The course will be conducted, on the whole, in a seminar rather than lecture format and class size is limited for that reason. I will generally introduce each topic with a brief lecture, but much of what you learn will be from the readings and class discussion. Assignments include a midterm, a final, an 8-10 page course paper and weekly questions submitted on the readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 458(558). Psychology of Adolescence.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 401.019.

Instructor(s): Cortina

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/458/001.nsf

This course will provide an overview of current theory and research regarding adolescent development. We will cover many aspects of adolescence and emerging adulthood, including biological, cognitive, and social changes; family, peer, and school influences; and both normative and problematic psychosocial development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Monique A Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/464/001.nsf

The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, discussion) with skill development through participation in group exercises. The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on class participation, group projects, and peer ratings. The course pack that you will be using is from Accu-Copy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1 and 4, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 473(573). Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250 or 290, and PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 478(414/574). Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rosario E Ceballo (rosarioc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 or 114. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/478/001.nsf

The goal of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of the spectrum of academic and clinical activities in the field of clinical psychology. Topics that will be addressed include the history of clinical psychology as a profession, issues in diagnosis and the classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, theoretical approaches to therapeutic interventions, and issues relating to ethics, training, research, and professionalism in clinical psychology. In addition, the roles of culture and gender within each of these areas will be explored, and specialty areas within the field, like child clinical work, community-based psychology, and health psychology will also be examined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 499 / WOMENSTD 499. Psychology of Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lilia Cortina (lilia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or women's studies, and sophomore standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/499/001.nsf

This course introduces students to a variety of perspectives on the psychology of women, with a focus on empirical research findings. Examples of some of the topics covered are: women's development across the lifespan (women's mental health, sexuality); women at home and in families (motherhood, domestic violence); women in the workplace (women's careers, sexual harassment); and women in the non-work public sphere (media representations of women, women and social systems).

Students will be expected to complete a moderate amount of reading and writing, take several in-class exams (multiple choice and short answer format), and participate actively in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 322 Hormones and Behavior.

Instructor(s): Jill Becker (jbbecker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/531/322.nsf

Do hormones influence behavior? Yes. Hormones can have a profound effect on the brain and this can produce changes in behavior. Hormone-brain-behavior relations in humans, dogs, rats, frogs, moths, and other animals will be the topics of discussion. Behaviors to be discussed include sex differences in the brain, as well as hormonal influences on mating behavior, courtship behavior, parental behavior, aggression, thirst, feeding, cognitive functions, and stress responses. Grades will be based on the results of three exams.

Required text: Behavioral Endocrinology, 2nd edition Becker et al (2002).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 546 Sleep Neurobiology, Medicine, and Society. Meets with NeurSci 520.001.

Instructor(s): Ralph Lydic (rlydic@umich.edu), Helen A. Baghdoyan

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/neurosci/520/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to give students the most up-to-the-date information on the biological, personal, and societal relevance of sleep. Personal relevance is emphasized by the fact that the single best predictor of daytime performance is the quality of the previous night's sleep. The brain actively generates sleep, and the first third of the course will overview the neurobiological basis of sleep cycle control.

Sleep will be used as a vehicle for teaching basic neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological principles. This information will provide a cellular-level understanding of how sleep deprivation, jet lag, and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine alter sleep and wakefulness. It is now clear that sleep significantly alters physiology.

The second third of the course will cover sleep-dependent changes in physiology and sleep disorders medicine. Particular emphasis will be placed on disorders of excessive sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep-dependent changes in autonomic control. Chronic sleep deprivation impairs immune function and promotes obesity. Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4:00 and 6:00 A.M., and the second portion of the class will highlight the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine.

The societal relevance of sleep will be considered in the final portion of the class. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented society, operator-error by one individual can have a disastrous negative impact on public health and safety. Fatigue-related performance errors contributed to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant failures and to the Exxon Valdez Alaskan oil spill. The personal relevance of fatigue-related performance errors will be considered by reviewing recent data showing that in the U.S. more people die from medical mistakes each year than from highway accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS.

Fulfillment of course objectives will be quantified by pre- versus post-class informational self-evaluation. In-class arousal levels will be facilitated by seminar participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 551. Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology.

Section 002 Teaching Outside the Box. (3 credits). Meets with Education 547.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Paris (sparis@umich.edu), Melissa Jo Mercer

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/educ/547/001.nsf

This course will be innovative in both method and substance. Students will learn how to promote inquiry about objects and places through teaching strategies such as question-posing, self-guided discovery, and collaborative problem solving. Multiple perspectives on objects and deep analyses of free-choice environments will be the focus of our experiences in these settings. Aesthetic as well as cognitive analyses will be elicited. Visual literacy for "reading objects" will be examined as critical thinking skills. Web-based discussion groups, virtual tours, and examination of digitized virtual objects will be examined as ways of extending first order encounters with objects. Non-cognitive outcomes, such as environmental attitudes and ecological stewardship, will be studied in indoor and outdoor settings. Aesthetic appreciation will be analyzed developmentally in art museums and gardens. Discipline-based reasoning strategies will be explored in history museums. Autobiographical memories and personal meaning making will be examined with objects in all settings. These dynamic processes will expand students' views of learning as well as their appreciation for the power of objects and places to provoke new understanding.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 434 Media and Violence. Meets with COMM 481.005

Instructor(s): L Rowell Huesmann (huesmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the theoretical and empirical connections between violence in society and portrayals of violence in the mass media. Because one cannot fully understand the relation between media violence and violence in society without first understanding the causes of aggressive and violent behavior, we will begin by examining the nature of aggressive and violent behavior and how it develops. We will consider both situational factors that promote aggression across individuals and personal factors that account for individual differences. We will examine the physiological, psychological, cognitive, social, and environmental factors implicated in the development of habitual aggressive and violent behavior. Then, we will discuss the role of the mass media as socializing agents and delve into the research and theory on media violence and aggression. After critically examining the empirical research relating exposure to violence to short term and long term increases in aggressive behavior, we will elaborate the psychological processes that explain these relations. We will also consider what theoretical extensions are necessary to account for the effects of new media such a electronic games and specific types of media violence such as pornography. Finally, we will discuss societal and individual approaches to controlling violence and to mitigating the effects of media violence.

Required text: Berkowitz, L. (1993). Aggression: Its Causes, Consequences and Control. New York: McGraw-Hill. A coursepack will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 462 The Self.

Instructor(s): Jennifer K Crocker (jcrocker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/581/462.nsf

The pursuit of self-esteem is pervasive in US culture. This course will provide an overview of the social psychology of the self, with a special emphasis on self-esteem, and its consequences for learning and mastery, relationships, self-regulation, and mental and physical health. Students will learn about the self through a combination of reading and discussion of original journal articles, and exploring the role of self-esteem in their own lives, using techniques such as daily diaries of self-esteem, questionnaire measures, and experiential exercises to explore the nature of each student's self-esteem. Introduction to psychology (111) and social or personality psychology are required. Grades will be based on participation in discussion, two papers and completion of weekly exercises. Readings will be original journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 511 Experimental Methods in Attitudes and Social Cognition Research.

Instructor(s): Monique A Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this hands-on seminar, students will learn about conducting experimental research on attitudes and social cognition by working with the instructor on a number of research projects. Students will help design and conduct an experiment, and analyze data. A reading list will be provided. All students will submit an APA style report on their experiment. Grades will be based on the research report as well as performance working on the experiment. Enrollment by permission of the instructor only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for PSYCH.


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