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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Russian


This page was created at 7:59 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


RUSSIAN 101. First-Year Russian.

Language

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 111. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/russian/101/001.nsf

In this course, the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The course is supplemented by video shows. Textbook: Nachalo I. There is a required grammar/culture section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 102. First-Year Russian, Continued.

Language

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103, 111, or 112. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, the sequel to RUSSIAN 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Nachalo II.

There is a required grammar/culture section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 102.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 103 / RCCORE 193. Intensive First-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/services.html

This course covers in one term what is ordinarily covered in two terms of RUSSIAN 101 and 102 and carries eight credits. Students are expected to complete approximately 16-20 hours of homework per week and attend four hours of co-curricular activities (Russian Table/Russian Tea).

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Both vocabulary and grammatical structures are presented in a situational context. Abundant cultural material is introduced throughout the course. Upon the completion of this course, the student can understand simple written texts or short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! (Volume 1) by Davidson, Gor, and Lekic, Kendall/Hunt, 1996. PAK: textbook, workbook, video- and audio-tapes.
  2. Russian Stage One: Live from Moscow! (Volume 2) by Davidson, Gor, Lekic, Kendall/Hunt, 1996. PAK: textbook, workbook, video- and audio-tapes.
  3. Course pack at Dollar Bill.

Recommended, but not required:

  1. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! Volume I CD-ROM, 1998. Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-4520-8.
  2. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! Volume II CD-ROM, 1998. Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-4678-6.
  3. The Russian Reference Grammar: Core Grammar in Functional Context by J. Watzke, J. Sweigert, Jr., Kendall/Hunt 1997, ISBN 0-7872-4467-8.
  4. Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 201. Second-Year Russian.

Language

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (RUSSIAN 101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 222. Russia Today.

Literature

Section 001 Contemporary Russia as a "Multi-National" Country.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/russian/222/001.nsf

This course is intended to introduce aspects of Russia today to a general student audience, with special emphasis on contemporary Russia as a "multi-national" country. No background in the subject is required. Among the many issues which this course intends to raise are: the complexities and contradictions of the multiple national identities characteristic of Russia's extraordinary ethnic mix; the attempt to recover the past in Russian culture today; the ways we look at the Russians through our own media; the economic and political transformations of Russia, as reflected in culture and everyday life. Particular attention will be paid this year to the Chechen conflict, its meaning for Russia, and its representation in Russian culture. There are three informal lectures per week, and a discussion section. Assignments will include readings, film viewings, and regular surveys of English-language media for news about Russia today. Written assignments for the course are: two short papers and a weekly journal. There also will be three in-class examinations of one hour each, as indicated in the syllabus. Each one-hour examination is worth 10% of the final grade; each paper is worth 20% of the final grade; the journals in total are worth 10% of the final grade. Work in sections (participation in discussions) is worth 20% of the final grade. There is no final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 231. Russian Culture and Society: An Introduction.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to Russian culture and seeks to acquaint students with the major achievements of Russian art, music, literature, architecture and cinema. Students will be introduced to the most interesting aspects of Russian history, religious mind, social consciousness and daily life. Examining the evolution of Russian culture from the 10th century to the present day we study major masterpieces of Russian fiction and Russian primary chronicles (in excerpts), Russian icons and architecture, the so called "Russian style" in fine arts, the basic writings of the Slavophiles and the Westernizers, as well as classics of Russian cinema. We will trace how the most important social, intellectual, and religious issues of Russian culture have been changing throughout Russian history. The course is taught with the aid of multimedia visual and audio presentations. Topics include reform and stagnation, violence and repentance, utopia and modernity. The course is designed to appeal to students with no background in Russian studies, and to those thinking about becoming Russian concentrators. No knowledge of Russian is required. Participation in class discussions, four quizzes, and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 301. Third-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 202 or 203, and satisfactory scores on a proficiency test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Third-Year Russian starts with the assumption that the basic aspects of the language have been assimilated, and therefore emphasizes practical skills reading, writing, and speaking. Difficult grammatical points are reviewed and vocabulary is greatly enlarged. Upon the completion of this course the student can understand prolonged written and spoken passages on familiar topics, carry out a prolonged conversation, and write two- to three-page essays on assigned topics. The course studies social and political reforms, works on the acquisition of core active and passive vocabularies in the areas of history and politics, introduces students to more complex vocabulary and syntactic structures typical of historical and political texts.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. Russian Reforms: Revolutions from Above by S. Maksudov, Natalia Pokrovsky, FC-IZDAT Publishers, 1998. ISBN 0-9637035-6-0.
  2. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar by T. Wade, Blackwell, 1997. ISBN 0-63117502-4.
  3. A Grammar Workbook by T. Wade, Blackwell, 1996. ISBN 0-63119381-2.
  4. Course pack at Dollar Bill.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials: Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

Cost: $100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 347(451) / RCHUMS 347. Survey of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 Russian Fiction, 1820-1870.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 351. Introduction to Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001 TAUGHT IN RUSSIAN.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Miller

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 202 or 203. Taught in Russian. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/russian/351/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to Russian poetry and prose (folktales, short stories, and excerpts of longer works) and basic literary terminology and concepts. Readings and discussions will be in Russian. Emphasis in the course will be placed on developing reading, writing, and speaking skills. Grades will be based on weekly response papers in Russian, participation in class discussion and activities, an oral presentation on an individual author, and announced quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credits elected, but must correspond to writing expectations of upper-level department courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 401. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 302 or 303. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Russian 401 is offered during the Fall Term and Russian 402 is offered during the Winter Term of every academic year. Prerequisites: three years of Russian (minimum). Classwork, homework, and labwork include: grammar and word formation; reading and listening (films and TV news included); discussions; oral reports and compositions. Bi-weekly grammar tests and final oral presentation. Textbook: Let's Talk About Life! by Emily Tall and Valentina Vlasikova; cost is $42.00 and covers two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 463. Chekhov.

Literature

Section 001 Meets with Russian 855.001

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/russian/463/001.nsf

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 478. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years.

Literature

Section 001 Meets with English 482.004.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Knowledge of Russian not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a first part of a historical as well as theoretical introduction to Nabokov's intellectually challenging literary art as a unique phenomenon of Russo-American cultural synthesis. Readings during fall term include Russian short stories and novels (King-Queen-Knave, Glory, The Eye, Despair, The Gift, Invitation to a Beheading, and the unfinished Solus Rex), plays (The Grand-dad and The Waltz Invention), selected poetry, and Nabokov's first English novel The Real Life of Sebastian Knight. The students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov.

There will be a midterm paper (consisting of a critical report on selected items of secondary reading) and a final take-home exam: a selection of essay topics, and some specific questions and i.d.'s. Independent research papers of high quality (the best were last year published in "The Nabokovian") instead of a final take-home are encouraged, as are lively contributions to class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 485. Poetics & Rhetoric.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, to be taught in English, introduces the fundamental concepts of poetics and rhetoric relevant to Slavic verbal art, including metrics, phonosemantics, poetry of grammar, theory of tropes and figures, composition, problems of literary genre and kind, thematics and plot theory, and classification and history of styles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The first half of the two-term Honors course. Honors students, working in consultation with the Honors advisor and a thesis supervisor conduct research on an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of RUSSIAN 491 the students should have a detailed bibliography and a prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the advisor are expected. Studies continue with RUSSIAN 492.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for RUSSIAN.


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This page was created at 7:59 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.


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