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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 8:00 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, written and oral exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 016, 017 – By permission of Comprehensive Studies Program.

Instructor(s): Karen Johnson Primorac

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 103. SPANISH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed SPANISH 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in SPANISH 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect SPANISH 103 if they have completed the equivalent of SPANISH 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing SPANISH 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:

  • Visión y Voz, Galloway-Labarca (Wiley). (Students placed in 231 have the option to buy the customized version for SPANISH 231 that contains only the last two units of the book, workbook and laboratory manual).
  • SPANISH 231. Course pack. Primis custom publishing (McGraw-Hill Co.)
  • Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/232/001.nsf

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course, and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials.

Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

TEXTS:

  1. Required:
    • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Course pack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments
  2. Recommended:
    • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of six cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the three required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
    • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
    • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 003, 004 – Introduction to the Hispanic World through Cinema.

Instructor(s): Andrew Noverr (anoverr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

Using the medium of cinema, the goal of this course will be to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (Hispanic America and Spain). The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience of Hispanic history and society that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time, students will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency:

  1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events;
  3. hypothesize about the future and present.

Some of the movies to be presented and discussed:

  • Todo sobre mi madre
  • La lengua de las mariposas
  • La historia oficial
  • Mi familia | My family

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 011, 012 – Business Spanish.

Instructor(s): Betina Schlossberg (betina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The objective of the course is to able to manage in the business world and to understand the cultural differences between the U.S. and the Hispanic world and among the different Spanish speaking countries.

The course will expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the cultural aims of the course while developing the grammatical functions and notions necessary to perform appropriately in business situations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 017, 024, 025 – Representing Lorca: Introduction to Spanish Culture and Performance of his Works.

Instructor(s): José Luis Fernández (kronox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The aim of this course is to motivate students to learn Spanish using plays, poems and the Spanish culture as background to put materials into context.

Most of the course content studied will reflect the world of Federico García Lorca, a well known Spanish playwright and poet. The course will expand on the significance of feelings, the life and death of the poet, analysis of his works and ultimately attempts to involve students in discussion and examination of the ideas presented.

Throughout the course one of his works, Blood wedding, will be acted out by the students. Therefore willingness to participate in it is a must.

We will as well expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the aims of the course, that is:

  1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events;
  3. hypothesize about the future and present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 024, 025 – Representing Lorca: Introduction to Spanish Culture and Performance of his Works.

Instructor(s): José Luis Fernández (kronox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

See Spanish 232.017.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 028, 029 – Contemporary Spain.

Instructor(s): Joaquín Florido–Berrocal (biligon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The aim of this course will be to expand the cultural understanding of Spain by studying its history, politics, society, customs and language. At the same time you will further acquire the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Spanish culture and to express, in the past, present, and future, your own personal experiences, opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Throughout the course of the term we will be focusing on the following general themes:

  • Chapter 1 – introduction to the course, meeting each other, differences in educational systems and the art of Pablo Picasso
  • Chapter 2 – a comprehensive review of Spanish History
  • Chapter 3 – Civil War, dictatorship in Spain and the democratic process today
  • Chapter 4 – the traditions, customs and life style in Spain

The emphasis of the course is on the development of the four skills (listening, writing, reading, and speaking) and interpersonal communication. The practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary will be integrated into the content of the course. Most of these features will be review as you will have studied them previously; therefore, the goal will be to facilitate their acquisition and application in authentic and meaningful contexts. The course requires regular classroom participation and approximately two hours of outside preparation for every hour of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/275/001.nsf

SPANISH 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/276/001.nsf

SPANISH 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Text: Course pack. Part 1 at Excel (1117 South University); Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – Spanish for Legal Professions.

Instructor(s): Betina Schlossberg (betinas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/305/home.htm

Spanish for Legal Professionals

The course will include language tools, functions and notions necessary to move in the Hispanic Legal World. The goal will be to introduce students to the different areas of the Legal studies from a Hispanic perspective. For that purpose the following will be considered in class: Roman System vs. Common Law System, Business Law, Criminal Law, Family Law, International Law, and other matters related to legal affairs.

Students are expected to participate in discussions, case studies, business and legal writing.

Students will be evaluated through class participation, written assignments, a group project and a mid-term exam and a final exam.

Materials will be handed to students or posted in Coursetools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 002 – Spanish for business.

Instructor(s): Maria De Lourdes Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/305/home.htm

Business Spanish 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the course is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish rammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

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SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 003 – Spanish for medical professions.

Instructor(s): Ann M Hilberry

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/305/home.htm

This course's objective is to prepare students who will be working in medical fields to interact with the Spanish-speaking population. Students will build up their Spanish vocabulary and will hone their linguistic skills to prepare them to communicate effectively in Spanish in situations relating to the medical professions. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will require active daily participation on the part of the students as great emphasis will be placed on pair work and small group work. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a written midterm exam, and an oral final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 308(401/306). Workshop in Academic Writing.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275, 276. SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students who are currently registered in at least one other upper-level Spanish course, and who wish to refine their writing skills. Students will use class time to review points of grammar, principles of composition, and techniques of literary analysis, using writing assignments for their other Spanish courses as the material. Students will bring essays to class for peer-editing and assistance from the instructor. The emphasis will be on improving grammar and vocabulary for written expression.

The class will meet once a week, and students are required to meet with the instructor for peer-editing and consultation at least one additional hour per week.

Students who are not concurrently enrolled in other upper-level Spanish courses are not eligible for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 315. Discussion of Current Issues in the Caribbean and South America.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001, 002 – (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Checa

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on improving oral performance while researching and discussing current issues in a Hispanic country or region. Students will read and gather material from the Internet (newspapers, web magazines, web-sites in Spanish). They will conduct this research in pairs or groups and report back to class through presentations, student-led discussions, role-playing, etc. Students also will become familiar with the historical background of the region through additional brief readings in history.

Evaluation will be based on active class participation, oral presentation of research conducted on the Internet, and results of two exams. The class will meet twice a week for discussion and require one hour of additional work outside of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Felipe Gomez

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/320/001.nsf

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read – including narrative, drama, poetry, and film – are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Monika Szumilak (mszumila@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/320/002.nsf

En este curso vamos a leer una variedad de textos de habla espanola de diferentes paises y regiones geograficas. Las metas de nuestra lectura y discusion son profundizar el conocimiento de culturas hispanas a traves de su letras y, de otro lado, aprender como aprevechar mejor la lectura de los textos literarios.

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SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Dennis D Pollard

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/320/003.nsf

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read – including narrative, drama, poetry, and film – are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Dosinda Garcia-Alvite

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read – including narrative, drama, poetry, and film – are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 005.

Instructor(s): John Patrick Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read – including narrative, drama, poetry, and film – are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 337. Poetry Workshop.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The basic purpose of this workshop is to cultivate the taste for reading and writing poetry. In the first few weeks students will acquire a basic set of conceptual and analytical tools. These will help them identify the various components and materials of a poem, and to better articulate their oral and written responses to the poetry that they read, listen to, or write throughout the semester. They will also be exposed to some of the technical and ideological issues dealing with the act of reading and composing poetry. In the second part of the workshop, students will learn how to read and appreciate various specific types of contemporary poetry. We will use Molly Peacock's How to Read a Poem as our guide, but we will examine a different set of poems written in Spanish. The professor will pick some of these poems, but students will also get to make their own selections. We will read a limited number of poems in considerable detail. After reading and discussing individual poems, students will then have the opportunity to try their hand at composing a poem of a similar style and content, in either Spanish or English. Students will also be asked to maintain a journal that records their impressions, thoughts, and ideas as they read and write each of these poems, and where they reflect upon the experience of reading and writing poetry. The grade for this course will be based on the student's class participation and attendance, two exams, and the Journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 340. Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The history of Spain and its people while following the general development of other Western countries, offers some peculiarities that are due to the presence of a highly advanced culture that has left important physical and cultural traces. Its varied history that goes from the Roman times to Arabic domination to its development as the superpower of the Renaissance world has created a complex society that is still seeking to find coherence and unity. This course seeks to give an overview of Spanish history and society by focusing on some of the major points of its history. The course will have unit readings on a variety of topics that go from the Moorish conquest, to the role of the Inquisition, the Conquest of America as well as the more problematic modern period that includes the Civil War, the dictatorship, and the return to democracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 372. Survey of Spanish Literature, II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (camarero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Latin American Realisms from Independence to the Present.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through the medium of the short story this course examines the notion of the real in relation to competing and conflicting notions of modernity in nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America. Historically, Latin America's most influential narrative forms (for example, romanticismo, gauchesca, modernismo, indigenismo, criollismo, negrismo, realismo mágico, lo fantástico, or testimonio) are situated at the problematic intersection between competing histories, languages, and social systems; conflicting visions of reality or of the future; and unequal processes of development between social groupings (ethnicities, genders, etc.). This course examines the ways in which modernity has been construed and questioned from within Latin America's enormously rich tradition in short narrative. The course includes readings by Esteban Echeverría, Clorinda Matto De Turner, Ricardo Palma, Rubén Darío, Leopoldo Lugones, Horacio Quiroga, Roberto Arlt, Jorge Luis Borges, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Felisberto Hernández, Juan José Arreola, Miguel Angel Asturias, José María Arguedas, Juan Rulfo, Rosario Castellanos, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, Virgilio Piñera, Mario Benedetti, Rodolfo Walsh, Elena Poniatowska, Luisa Valenzuela, Cristina Peri Rossi, Alberto Fuguet, Pía Barros.

Course work will evaluated on the basis of three in-class essays, one final essay, and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 387. Social Forces and Literary Expression in Golden Age Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Early modern Spain was a landscape of conflicting impulses. On the one hand, the imperial expansion triggered creativity, spontaneity, and cultural freedom; on the other hand, wars, economic crisis, and religious dissent gave way to a tendency towards order and restraint. This course will address these issues through literary works (Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes, Santa Teresa, San Juan, Lope de Vega, Quevedo), paintings (El Greco, Velázquez, Murillo), music, and political writings. Class lectures and discussion will be held in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent Study. Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the analysis of the major morphological and syntactic structures of Spanish. The course begins with a consideration of morphology, with topics such as the function of inflexional suffixes, the role of derivational suffixes, word order rules, verb morphology, etc. and then moves to the description and analysis of the simple and complex sentence, their syntax and their use. The course will be complemented by practical exercises, and the identification, segmentation and analysis of the various types of sentences studied. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a required research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 413 / ROMLING 413 / EDCURINS 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberly S Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 428. Internship in Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and two 300-level SPANISH courses. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows up to 3 credits for internships that involve the extensive use of Spanish, either abroad or within the US. Some of the internships may be offered in established study-abroad programs, others will be offered by companies or non-profit organizations. We highly recommend the non-profit organization, Amigos de las Americas [www.amigoslink.org], a well-established volunteer program that places students in public health projects throughout Latin America.

Our department offers a community service course (Spanish 448), but we do not have the means to organize individual internships, so students will have to take the initiative to locate, arrange, and propose the internships.

Requirements and Procedures: Before the internship, you must arrange the following:

  1. Find a sponsoring faculty member who will advise you, suggest readings, and evaluate the written work that you will submit during and/or after you complete the internship.
  2. Submit a letter from the director or supervisor of the internship program. This letter must:
    1. describe the service work you will perform,
    2. confirm that you will primarily use Spanish in that service work,
    3. specify how many working hours are involved (a minimum of 100 contact hours is required for a three-credit course, or 33 hours per credit if enrolled for less than 3 credits).
  3. Submit a proposal that includes a reading list and written assignments. In the proposal include:
    1. an introductory paragraph that describes the work-site and the services you will perform. Also indicate how the work relates to your academic interests and specialization (majors/minor) and to your future career plans.
    2. a brief list of readings related to your service work-for example, 2-3 books, or 5-10 articles, or an appropriate mix of books and articles. You may choose readings yourself or ask your faculty sponsor for suggestions. We recognize that in an internship, most of your time is taken up by service work, but we require a minimum amount of related readings, as they will help you to reflect critically and thoughtfully on your experiences.
    3. a description of your writing assignments, which may consist either of several short papers or a final project, but must total 10-20 pages. You may write, for example, a narrative summary of your experiences, including critical reflections that also draw from the readings. Or you may write a research paper based on your experiences and the readings.

After completing the internship, you will submit to your faculty sponsor the remaining written assignments along with a second letter from your supervisor in the internship program. This letter should describe the work you performed and reconfirm that it met the requirements of 100 contact hours of primary Spanish usage (or 33 hours per credit).

Enrollment: You may enroll in this course, Spanish 428, either during the term in which you are working as an intern-in which case you would submit the written work at the end of that term; or you may enroll in the term after you return from the internship and submit your work then (which may typically be the case for students who have worked abroad as an intern). In either case, however, you must make arrangements in our department before you begin the internship, by finding a faculty sponsor and submitting a proposal for his/her approval. If you are already abroad when you find an opportunity for an internship, you may through email seek a faculty sponsor and send a proposal to him/her before you begin work. In such a case, first contact professors with whom you have had class. If none is available to serve as a sponsor, contact Amy Roust, our Advising Coordinator [aroust@umich.edu], and she will give you names of faculty to contact. When you are ready to enroll for the credits, your faculty sponsor will notify Sonia Schmerl, our Student Services Representative, and she will send in an override, allowing you to enroll in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 432. Gender, Writing, and Culture.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/432/001.nsf

This course asks, how do we get to be who we think we are? The "who we think we are" in this case is gender – masculine, feminine. Are these genders natural, part of our bodily equipment, are they learned as part of our social intercourse, are they put on as we might put on a tie or makeup? Texts studied will be primarily from the Iberian peninsula, and range from the late medieval period through the twentieth century. They will include the letters of the medieval woman Dhuoda to her son, the 15th-century misogynist treatise called Arcipreste de Talavera, some short novels by María de Zayas, poems by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, the life of a cross-dressing nun, advice books from the 19th and 20th centuries, the play Yerma of Federico García Lorca and his Sonetos de amor obscuro, and a film or two or Pedro Almodóvar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will discuss the answers that certain contemporary critics and authors have given to one or more of the following questions: What is literature? What is theory? What is the function of criticism? How should one study and write about literature? Should the discipline of criticism be transformed into an act of anti-academic indiscipline? Do literature and criticism make a difference in the world? Can/ should it? Also, what is an author? What is the relationship between authorship and authority, and between writing and gender? What is the difference between poetry and criticism? Should poetry and criticism be separate or united endeavors?

The list of texts we will read and discuss throughout the semester include: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan Culler, The Function of Criticis by Terry Eagleton, Psiquemaquinas by Miguel Morey, Loiterature by Ross Chambers, La vuelta al dia en ochenta mundos by Julio Cortazar, El mono gramatico by Octavio Paz, La risa de la Medusa by Helene Cixous, and Tercer Mundo by Mayra Santos.

The course will be conducted in Spanish. The grade will be based on class participation and several short response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Nation/Transnation: Literature of Exile in the Spanish Caribbean.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is the relationship between exile and literature in the Caribbean? Could exile - as a political, economic and cultural reality – be a common link for understanding Caribbean literatures and cultures? The purpose of this course is to analyze representations of exile in various literary texts from the Spanish Caribbean (poetry, novel, crónica, short story) to explore themes such as: the relationship of exiled literature with colonialism, definitions of nationality (nation/transnation/ "post" nationalism) notions of subjectivity, politics of identity (race, gender, sexuality) and writing. The course is a survey of authors and historical periods that addresses the specificities of exile since Nineteenth century to contemporary authors. Some of the authors selected are: José Martí, Eugenio Ma. De Hostos, José L. González, Lydia Cabrera, and Giannina Braschi among others. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Two short essays (5 pages) and a final paper is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jossiana Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students interested in using the Spanish language within a social context and in interacting with local Latino/a communities. It integrates work within a Spanish-speaking community with academic readings and learning about U.S. Latino or Hispanic culture. Students go once a week to the community site and also attend a weekly class seminar where they reflect on the theoretical, cultural, linguistic and practical issues regarding their service experience.

Students can complete this course by working as peer mentors for community-service learning courses in Spanish or by enrolling in a community-service learning course within a Hispanic/Latino community setting.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

This course will meet on MWF for one hour each day for approximately the first two weeks. After that time, the Monday class period will be designated for the weekly seminar. Students will be divided into teams, and on Wednesdays and Fridays, they will go to Detroit for community service work, principally with latino students in public schools. A given team will work in Detroit on either Wednesday or Friday – not on both days – leaving at 1:00 and not returning until 4:30 or 5:00. Therefore, students who wish to take this course must have their afternoons free.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 459. Don Quijote.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Don Quijote es la cumbre de la literatura española y una de las mas importantes de la literatura universal. En ella están presentes tanto los problemas e ideales y problemas de la época de su autor como los de todos los tiempos. La lectura del Quijote es un ejercicio de la mas alta calidad, reconfortante al mismo tiempo que produce una excepcional emocion estetica. El curso tiene como objeto que el estudiante haga una introduccion a la obra que le permita disfrutar tanto de los mundos ideologicos de retórico del Quijote. El estudiante debe leer detenidamente la obra y hacer un trabajo sobre un tema especifico, segun la metodologia que el profesor requiere.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 464. Spanish Romanticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

National consolidation and romantic novels go hand in hand in Latin America. We will begin this course discussing the notions of ideology, national culture, and social formation. We will then go on to compare three novels of the period: the Uruguayan José Marmol's Amalia (1851), the Colombian Jorge Issac's María (1867), and the Mexican Ignacio Altamirano's El Zarco (1888). Through the study of these three romantic novels we will explore the relationship between fiction, the formation of national states, and the organization of nineteenth-century free trade.

Students taking this course should be interested in Latin American politics. Course requirements will include three partial exams (60%) and a final take-home (40%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 466. The Modern Spanish Novel II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Spanish Women Writers.

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the novelistic and autobiographical literary production of women from the 1930s through to the 1970s in Spain. Special emphasis will be placed on the literary strategies enabling women to articulate 'feminine subjectivity' from within a society founded on 'franquista' patriarchy. We will analyze the ways in which women elaborate discourses that include sexual (Moix), political (Chacel), and social practices (Rododera) that were censored by the regime and to which women were offically denied access. The purpose of the class, then, is to examine the extent to which women's writing incorporates gender specific strategies of articulation, analyze what those strategies might be, and reflect upon how they are received by a female and a male readership. In this sense, special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between writing and reading in the establishment of a discourse designed to talk of 'feminine desire' from within 'Franquismo'. Readings will be placed in their social context and will be read in the light of dominant literary trends (the 'social', 'existential', and 'psychological' novels for example) in order to examine the way in which women's writing under Franco constitutes itself as a counter-discourse, almost always writing against the presence of a dominant, and censoring, 'other'. The course will include supplementary readings on women's writing, psychoanalitic, and feminist theory. Among the writers we'll be reading are: Laforet, Martín Gaite, Moix, Matute, Chacel, Rododera, and Ortiz.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Shadows of a Dictatorship: Literature and Memory in Post-Franco Spain.

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines Spanish cultural production after the death of Franco in 1975. Special emphasis will be placed on discourses generated as a result of the political and social transformations of the post-Franco period. The purpose of the course is to analyze the new modes of representation, the contemporary constructions of sexual, political, and regional identities in literature, and the complexities of post-dictatorial social practices that surfaced in the late 1970s and 1980s as an attempt to redefine a culture that had been subject, for decades, to monolithic and homogenizing state ideologies. Through readings of contemporary autobiography, fiction, essays, and poetry, we will analyze one of the most problematic areas of contemporary life in Spain: namely, the systematic erasure of a past upon which nobody wants to dwell, and the spectral presence of an authoritarian history which refuses to be cancelled out. The tensions that arise between these two forces will allow us to examine Spanish post modernity and the 'society of the spectacle' as two dominant discourses in contemporary Spain. With this intention in mind, the class will study contemporary Spanish literature in its historical and socio-cultural context, and students will accompany literary readings with secondary readings dealing with historical and cultural themes. Among the authors to be read are: Montero, Goytisolo, Rossetti, Grandes, Vázquez Montalbán, Mendicutti, Atxaga, Rivas, and Gopegui.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – FIRST IMAGES OF AMERICA: THE EARLY CHRONICLERS.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/spanish/470/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to study some of the stages of the long process best defined as the intellectual (and/or ideological) creation of America by the European subject. The course will focus on the culture specific ways in which European subjects confronted the new as well as on the ways they produced knowledge about the unknown. In order to do so, we will read the first text written by a European explorer, the Diary of Columbus (a paradigmatic narrative that served as a model for other texts), where the author gives an account of the new lands and their inhabitants. Next, we will read E. O'Gorman, who advances a theory about America as an entity or concept created by the European imagination (with the help of Columbus' Diary as a point of departure). After O'Gorman, we will study the Letters of Vespucci, the man after whom America was named and from whom a good number of myths about the New World started to gain currency. Another text to be analyzed is Pigafetta's account of Magellan's voyage of circumnavigation. The last author to be studied, Ulric Schmidel, produced a little known narrative that shows the other side of the Conquest: a failed enterprise (the first foundation of Buenos Aires).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Popular Literary Consciousness in the Andean Region.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study two Latin American novels written between 1920 and 1950. These novels (Jorge Icaza Huasipungo and Ciro Alegría's El mundo es ancho y ajeno) appear in a historical period when Latin America moves from the expansion of its export free-trade economies (1900-1930) into the period of import-substituting industrialization (1930-1950s). By shifting from the literary into the socio-historical development of Latin America throughout the first half of the twentieth century, this course will focus on how literature registers the creation of multiclass "populist" alliances. The course will also relate narrative with José Carlos Mariátegui's Siete ensayos de interpretacion de la realidad peruana, a key socio-political essay written in 1928.

Students taking this course should be motivated to study literature from economic and socio-political points of view. Students are expected to participate very actively in class discussions. The grade will be based on three take-home exams and a final oral interview.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 – Introduction to Medieval Spanish.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to offer students of Spanish literature (1) a non-technical introduction to the structure of Medieval Spanish, as compared with the modern language and (2) the opportunity to read Old Spanish literary texts in the original, with discussion of relevant linguistic and philological problems relevant to their interpretation. We will analyze excerpts from a wide variety of texts reflecting the linguistic diversity of Spain from ca. 1100 –1500. This course requires no previous background in linguistics. There will be a series of graded assignments throughout the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level SPANISH literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent Study. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of literary studies as a discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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