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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Core


This page was created at 5:18 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 Crime and Violence in America.

Instructor(s): Charles Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is notorious for its crime and violence. It sustains rates of violent crime and criminal incarceration, as well as levels of interpersonal violence, that outstrip all other industrial countries and most developing countries in the world. How and why is this so? Explanations range from macro-statements about the nature of American society to micro-examinations of individual deviance.

In this seminar section, we will focus on historical and sociological explanations of crime and violence, ranging from broad analyses of social inequality and racial/ethnic discrimination to narrower debates over guns, media, and the family. We will explore how patterns of violence have changed over time how violent was the wild west or prohibition-era Chicago? and how rural and urban violence have differed. We will pay particular attention to the legacies of race and criminalization in the American south and its migration to the urban north. And we will examine the relationship between police practices and legal sanctions, on the one end, and the forms of criminal activity and our knowledge of the "crime problem" on the other.

In pursuing these inquiries, we will try to set macro-explanations against, and in interaction with, individualistic lines of explanation that address the biological, genetic, and psychological sources of criminal violence. To do this, we will meet periodically in joint sessions with RCCORE 100.006 (Evans) which is focusing on the problem of crime and violence from the perspective of human behavior and its determinants. In these joint sessions, we will explore the dialectical terrain between social and individual explanations in an effort to deepen complexities and further understanding.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 Daemons, Princes, and Saints: Views of Love Across the Disciplines.

Instructor(s): David Burkam (dtburkam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The notion of love romantic, sacred, or profane has long captured the critical minds and creative talents of authors, artists, psychologists, biologists, and self-help gurus. In this seminar, we will sample from the wide range of personal and academic responses to this essentially-human emotion. Among the views of love we may explore are:

  1. the troubadours & courtly love,
  2. the theme of the demon lover,
  3. love in myth and fairy tales,
  4. sacred love and union with the Divine,
  5. eastern views of love,
  6. gay & lesbian love from myth and contemporary sources, and
  7. the psychological and biological foundations of love.

Course readings will be selected from a wide variety of sources in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We will read parts of Denis de Rougemont's now-classic historical book, Love in the Western World, and John Haule's updated perspective in Pilgrimage of the Heart. We will read short stories by Olive Schreiner, Shirley Jackson, Simeon Solomon, and O. Henry, and the poetry of Rumi and Omar Khyam. We'll read love letters and novels (May Sarton's The Small Room and C.S. Lewis' Till We Have Faces). We'll look at two "advice books" from the 1940s: How to Get Along with Girls, and How to Get Along with Boys. Selections from Diane Ackerman's A Natural History of Love and Arthur Janov's The Biology of Love will introduce us to the "science of love." Finally, we will glimpse at how psychologists and sociologists monitor our love-behavior with such social science research articles as: Love on the Internet: Involvement and Misrepresentation in Cyberspace vs. Realspace; Choosing a Mate in Television Dating Games: The Influence of Setting, Culture, and Gender; and Dating Experiences of Bullies in Early Adolescence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003, 004 Philosophy.

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to explore a wide range of challenging intellectual materials, extending from the classical works of Kant and Marx to current controversies, and from philosophical autobiography and drama to social science and law. We will read a different book each week, write about it, and discuss it thoroughly. Many short papers will be written by each student; these papers will serve as the focal points of our seminar meetings. The reading and writing demands on each student will be very substantial. A two-fold purpose will guide our study of each work: first, to clarify and grasp the theoretical issues it presents, and second, to search for the pleasure - intellectual and aesthetic - it may provide.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 005 Russian Film/Russian Life.

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will consider different aspects of Russian history, culture, and life by watching films and by reading various accompanying texts (historical accounts, short stories, analytical articles). There will sometimes be dramatic differences between the films and the written texts. This is to be expected since these "sources" will have been created at different times and for different purposes. In the process, we will learn not only about Russia, but also about the way "reality" is represented, whether in a work of art (fiction, film) or in "history." Representations can never be entirely objective - they have their own contexts, creators, sometimes external political constraints, and motivations.

The films we will watch and discuss cover a variety of periods: medieval Russia, the 19th century, the Russian Revolution, the 1920s period of economic and social reform, the Stalin years, World War II, Khrushchev and "the thaw," Gorbachev's era of openness (glasnost) and the post-Communist period of the 1990s. We will focus on a number of issues: class conflict, the roles of religion and of political ideology, intellectual freedom, ethnic tensions, the status of women, youth culture, and current economic problems. Some of the more well-known films we will study are Mother, Battleship Potemkin, Slave of Love, Bed and Sofa, Burnt By the Sun, Cranes Are Flying, Andrei Rublev, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Little Vera, Taxi Blues, Prisoner of the Mountains, The Thief, and Brother. There should be some lively discussions in which I hope you will all participate actively.

At the same time that we will be doing all of this, you will be working on becoming more effective writers. Each week there will be a film to see and a text to read. You will be expected to do a short paper, a paper revision, or a part of a longer paper almost every week. You will be getting detailed feedback on your writing throughout the term, and by its end you can expect to be a significantly better writer than when you started out. Evaluations for the course will be based not only on your papers, but on your contributions to class discussion as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 006 The Mind, the Brain, and Violence in America.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is notorious for its levels of violence. U.S. rates of interpersonal violence, violence crime, and criminal incarceration outstrip all other industrialized countries and most developing countries in the world. How and why is this so?

In this seminar section we will focus on biological and psychological explanations of violence and violent crime ranging from genetic, hormonal, and brain-based determinants, to the influence of upbringing, family dynamics, and personal experience. Is there a gene for violence? Are criminals made or born? Are violent individuals fundamentally different from the rest of us? Is there a part of the brain that mediates violent emotional behavior? How do biology and the environment interact to produce violent behavior?

In pursuing these inquiries we will try to set our individual explanations against, and in interaction with, historical and sociological explanations. To do this, we will meet periodically in joint sessions with RCCORE 100.001 (Bright) which is focussing on the problem of crime and violence from the perspective of those more macro-explanations. In these joint sessions we will explore the dialectical terrain between individual and social explanations in an effort to further understanding or what is undoubtedly a complex reality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 007 Love and Lovers in the Performing Arts and Literature of the Nineteenth Century.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the theme of love and courtship in selected examples of literature, dance, opera, and painting in the nineteenth century. The nineteenth century was marked not only by revolutionary changes in society but by artistic revolution. By the beginning of the twentieth century the conventions of style and subject matter of virtually every major art form had been radically altered as "romantic" ideas and ideals began to be replaced by a new and supposedly more hard-edged and realistic view of the world. This was especially true of one of the major themes of European art: the relationship between men and women as portrayed in books, the performing arts, and the visual arts. These changes have had a radical impact on our understanding of the "love" relationship even in our own time. Specific works to be considered this term may include the ballets Giselle, La Sylphide, Swan Lake, and others; the opera Carmen; novels by Emily Brontë, Gustave Flaubert, Emile Zola, and Edith Wharton; and paintings by Eduard Manet, Berthe Morisot, and other Impressionist artists. Our course for the most part will concentrate on works produced in France, but there will be a brief incursion into English and American arts. There will be a number of short papers and a seminar report at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 008 Inside the Dramatic Process: Image of the American Family.

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Theatre is one of the most collaborative art forms. Often playwrights have also been theatre practitioners, and their experience is integral to the plays they write. Many students have been trained to read plays as they would novels or stories, without the awareness of performance that makes the plays spring to life as they would on stage. The goal of this seminar is to make better readers and interpreters of dramatic literature and better audiences for the theater. It is also geared to those students who would have a real interest in theatre as performers and directors. During the term we will act as a repertory company approaching every dramatic text as a potential production. Students will have the opportunity to act, direct, and design. This production emphasis will be accompanied by a thorough interpretive study of the text as well. In this way, your analytical skills will be enhanced by your experience "inside the dramatic process."

This year we will be exploring American plays which deal with the important theme of family. We will be reading classics of the American stage by Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, and Sam Shepard as well as examining the changing image of the American family through the work of contemporary African-American, Asian-American, and Latino writers and playwrights from the Gay and Lesbian community.

Writing assignments will include short essays of an analytic nature, and several creative assignments, including an original play. You will have the opportunity to write as an actor and director and do research as a dramaturge. You will also do at least one performance critique. Written work will average five pages per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 009 Visual Media, Emergent Culture, and Individual Inquiry.

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics, readings, and discussion in this seminar originate from the intensely stimulating, often startling, technology-rich environment that we are now inhabiting. In this course, we primarily investigate meanings and messages to be derived from photography, television, and film. In the academic world, to be sure, we remain primarily concerned with words, so you are expected to write (and often revise) numerous papers designed to sharpen and extend your expressive, analytic, and research abilities. Papers and presentations to the class are intended to encourage you to articulate your individual impressions and ideas eloquently, precisely, and effectively in written language. Nonetheless, surrounding us are many differing forms of discourse, other than writing, competing for our attention. Our purpose here is to become increasingly alert to and knowledgeable about sources meanings and interpretations of those messages. We extend our analytic awareness and judgment by closely deciphering and reconsidering multiple, often intersecting, forms and styles of communication that influence our ways of knowing, all the while exploring our own belief systems, personal preferences and values, and cultural perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 010 Nietzsche: Philosopher of Nihilism and Psychologist of the Fascist Personality.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the history of Western thought and culture, Nietzsche remains one of the most original, courageous, and discomforting thinkers. As the father of 19th-century nihilism and 20th-century existentialism, he proclaimed: "God is dead. We have murdered him," and then proceeded to uncover a vision of existence as purposeless, empty, and incomprehensible. With his corrosive skepticism, he undermined all traditional and unquestioned absolutes and values: bourgeois morality, science and reason, Christianity, democracy, etc. all viewed as fraudulent attempts to mask a void, a nothingness yawning beneath man's daily life. But Nietzsche not only diagnosed the pathology and decadence of modern civilization, his philosophy also contained a visionary and prophetic impulse designed to lead man beyond the despair, triviality, and meaninglessness of contemporary life. A new form of purely secular redemption would be achieved by the self-affirming "individual" driven by the "Will to Power" to create a personal meaning in a meaningless world. Readings: Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy, Thus Spake Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, The Anti-Christ, Hitler, My Struggle (Mein Kampf, selections); texts of other Nazi intellectuals; and the Constitution of the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 011 Student Life at the University of Michigan, 1841-2001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Steneck (msten@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar provides students with an opportunity to place their own UM student experience in historical perspective. We will examine and discuss student life in past years through the writings of former UM students. These will include: the 1844-45 diary of George Pray, a member of the first class at UM; the humorous autobiographical novel Class of '57 by Jerry Harju, an engineering student from northern MI in the 1950s; selections from the novel Braided Lives by feminist author Marge Piercy, a student from Detroit in the 1950s; selections from Reunion: A Memoir by California politician Tom Hayden, student activist and Michigan Daily editor-in-chief in the late 1950s-early 1960s; and the 1988 commencement address (video and text) of Carole Simpson, ABC News weekend anchor and an African-American student at UM in the early 1960s. Through these very different writings we will examine what seems to change and what remains eternal in the world of the college student and how gender, race, economics and other background factors helped to shape these students' college experiences. Through their writings we will consider the relationship of students to their peers and university and to the town of Ann Arbor; the issues and doubts that concerned them; and how national and world events impacted and often profoundly affected them.

Reading and discussing texts critically and writing about those texts in 3-5 page papers will be our main concern throughout the course. Students will learn to use the UM data-retrieval system (MIRLYN) and will self-select background reading on the alumni writings to share with the class. A more extensive final project with a presentation to the class at the end of term will focus on either the historical or contemporary experience of students and provide a vehicle for discussion of student life today. Students will choose a topic and format according to their interests and the particular skills they want to develop more fully archival or library research, interviews, creative writing, multi-media presentation, etc. Projects over the last couple years have focused on: drug/alcohol/marijuana use, language curriculum, the bi-racial experience, hazing, legal drinking age, Black fraternities, automobiles and mobility in the 1950s, McCarthyism and UM, interviews with alumni from the 1950s and 1960s, changes in gender roles, a script for a play across historical time, a study of music from the alumni works read, etc.

Copies of Jerry Harju, Class of '57 (Marquette, MI: Lake Superior Press, 1997) will be available in the book stores this summer or from the publisher. Other works will be included in a course pack available in September. A good dictionary and style manual containing sample MLA and Chicago citations may be brought from home or purchased locally.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 012 Writing and Performing Indonesian Gender.

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to investigate gender roles in modern Indonesian society as seen in selected literary and musical traditions. My focus will be on how the two sexes interact in marriages, family, and society in two ethnic groups: the Javanese, and Angkola Batak. We will examine who has more power men or women and how power is defined through social status, prestige, wealth, or spirituality. Have gender relations changed in the 20th century and are they different in the various classes of Indonesian society? How are western ideals of female sexuality transforming the ways traditional Javanese singers perform, dress, and behave? Does the religion of a group influence gender relations? The literary works under examination will include This Earth of Mankind, a novel about early twentieth-century Java by Pramoedya Ananta Toer, said to be "Indonesia's greatest novelist;" Sitti Djaoerah, a novel about a young couple growing up in Sumatra in the early twentieth century, and a modern experimental play. We will examine the role of the two sexes in the following musical traditions: the Central Javanese gamelan orchestra, the sacred court bedhaya dance, a tradition of street singers (tayuban), and Sumatran vocal music.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 013 Perspectives on Affirmative Action.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Weisskopf (tomw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rccore/100/013.nsf

In this seminar we will address affirmative action (AA) in a variety of contexts and from a variety of perspectives. We will consider AA not only in the United States but also in several other countries, notably India, where various forms of AA have been practiced for almost a century. We will draw on readings from many different fields, for example, history, philosophy, law, politics, and economics and we will also read some personal narratives and view some films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 105. Logic and Language.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (MSA).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Argument is the focus of this course, both in symbols and in language. We deal with the forms of arguments, the application of them, what makes them valid or invalid, weak or strong. We do this in two concurrent ways, microcosmically and macro-cosmically.

Microcosmically, we examine the structure of arguments, what makes them tick. In the deductive sphere we deal with the relations of truth and validity to develop the logic of propositions, and enter the logic of quantification. In the inductive sphere, we deal with argument by analogy, and causal analysis, and with elementary probability theory.

Macro-cosmically, we do the analysis of real arguments in controversial contexts, as they are presented in classical and contemporary philosophical writing: ethical arguments (in Plato); political arguments (in J.S. Mill); and legal arguments as they appear in Supreme Court decisions. In all cases, both substance and form are grist for our mill.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCCORE 190. Intensive French I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Anderson-Burack (caburack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 191. Intensive German I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu), Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/grmindex.html

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 193 / RUSSIAN 103. Intensive First-Year Russian.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/services.html

See Russian 103.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 194. Intensive Spanish I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Maria López-Cotín (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rclang/194/001.nsf

The goal of these courses is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 195 / LATIN 195. Intensive Latin I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gina Marie Soter (soter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (Excl).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course meets for two hours per day and covers in one term the equivalent of two terms at the level of a non-intensive first-year collegiate course. During this term, students will learn the essential morphological, grammatical, and syntactical structures of Latin, and will build a basic vocabulary of the language. Through readings and discussion, students will become acquainted with significant aspects of Roman history and culture.

Lectures from the instructor will preview new material and flesh out the cultural context, but the primary format will be that of a workshop in which students come to class ready to test out and develop what they have been studying. Students will enhance skills through writing, listening, and speaking.

The immediate goal for this course is to provide students with the necessary morphological, grammatical, and syntactical structures to read intelligently (linguistically and culturally) texts from Classical and Medieval Latin.

Please contact the RC Academic Services Office (647-4364) for registration information.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 205. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 209. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 251. Intermediate German.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 290. Intensive French II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 291. Intensive German II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu), Erica Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.rc.lsa.umich.edu/programs/german/index.html

Intensive German II covers second-year German in one term. The goals of the course include review and expansion of the grammar and vocabulary presented in Core 191 and further development of student's reading, writing, and speaking skills. As in the other RC German courses, all instruction is conducted in German. Classroom instruction includes discussions, impromptu speaking exercises, performance of skits, numerous writing assignments, and listening and reading exercises. Reading materials include short prose, fairy tales, poetry, and magazine and newspaper articles. A primary objective which RCCORE 291 students strive to meet is "passing proficiency". Achieving this goal gives students a sense of pride and accomplishment. The proficiency exam serves as a qualifying exam for the next required course in the sequence, RCCORE 321 (German Readings).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 305. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 305. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 141 Hospital Volunteers' Service Learning Seminar. (1 CREDIT) (Drop/Add deadline=September 23).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is for RC students who are volunteering on the Adult Inpatient Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (6A), University of Michigan Hospital. The volunteer experience involves assisting hospital staff in their work with patients recovering from a variety of illnesses and injuries, most notably traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other diseases of the central nervous system. The time commitment is one four-hour shift per week during the term. Content of the seminar includes discussion of readings and of the hospital experience, and presentations of rehabilitation professionals (e.g. physicians, psychologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, nurses, social workers, biomedical engineers, etc.).

In addition to registering for the seminar, students must become official hospital volunteers by calling Volunteer Services [(734) 936-4327] beginning the week of August 12, 2002. Students are encouraged to arrange their shift for early evenings or weekends. A maximum of two students will be assigned per shift. When you call, be sure to specify your interest in 6A Adult Rehabilitation. The class will meet in D4100 Medical Professional Building. Contact Jeff Evans (jeevans@umich.edu) for additional information.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (Independent). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for the student who wishes experience in college teaching. The student-teacher functions as a teaching intern in a course. Regular staff meetings and individual conferences with the person in charge ensures that the intern shares in the overall planning and management of the course. The student may receive credit only once for student-teaching in the same course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 309. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 310. Accelerated Review-French.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of Proficiency, as defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College," in the four linguistic skills. Students who take 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course 290 to do so. "Accelerated Review-310" is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students.

In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style.

In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 311. Accelerated Review-German.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erica K Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students who have not yet passed the German proficiency exam, but who do not require the 8-credit RCCORE 291 to prepare themselves for it. Assignments develop students' mastery of the four skills and improve facility and accuracy of grammar and vocabulary. The goals of this course are to lead student to an advanced intermediate level of proficiency and prepare them for RCCORE 321.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helen W Webb (webbh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four semesters of language, but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this course is the discussion of primary source materials of literary, cultural, and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency in listening and reading comprehension, language structure, and composition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Les Miroirs Du Moi: The Study of the Self Through Diaries and Autobiographies.

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Do you keep a diary? Have you ever? Are you an afficionado of autobiographical works? Have you ever wondered what is meant by the term the self, what it really is and how one may apprehend it and speak about it? In this seminar, we will study the diary and the autobiography, the two literary genres whose object is unequivocally the self, its quest, discovery or affirmation. The reading of Montaigne and Descartes will highlight the birth of individualism and subjectivity which the 16th and 17th centuries witnessed, and will lead us to the 18th century, when formal writings of the self began to flourish, as in, for instance, Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Using works from the 18th to the 20th century, we will initially establish the specificity of the diary and of the autobiography as literary genres. We will then examine the different problematics emerging as one undertakes the project of portraying oneself. As we question the intentions and the results of the writer's project, as well as the reliability of the narrator, we will attempt to define the concept of the self - what it is, how or whether it can be apprehended and fully expressed, and so forth. Our discussion, enriched by conceptions* of the self developed in the philosophical and psychological fields psychological fields will encourage us to formulate our own conception of the self.

*Conceptions presented in class from : Socrates, R. Descartes, Maine de Biran, J.-P. Sartre, S. Freud, E. Erikson, A. Maslow, C. Rogers, B.F. Skinner

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 002 French Theater.

Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Jacques Prévert's opus mirrors the changes and upheavals of the mid-20th century in France. Be it in his poems, film scripts or songs, he helps us to trace and understand the social and artistic developments of his time: the Surrealist movement, the cubists, the advent of the first socialist government in France, the Second World War. His dedication to social justice, to the anti-war movement and (ahead of his time) to the protection of nature, colored by humor and a humanistic approach, permeates his writings, even his celebrated love poems.The course will draw on his multi-faceted literary production as a support to introduce students to the historical background of that period; as a means to become acquainted with other artists of the time who were friends with Prévert (Picasso, Doisneau); and as a vehicle to help students to increase their knowledge of, and ease with, the language. The final project will be a public performance, followed by a performance for high schools, relying on multimedia and the many talents of the participants (researching, performing, singing, illustrating). Students taking this course must be prepared to come to all extra sessions and rehearsals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 003 Existentialism: The Human Condition and the Absurd.

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Far from being a doctrine, Existentialism is fundamentally a philosophical tendency. Born of a reaction against Hegelian rationalism, the different existentialist tendencies come together in the rehabilitation of freedom, subjectivity, and individual existence. In this course, we will attempt, through our readings, to discern the characteristics of various existentialist concepts. After a brief survey of the precursors and the "founders" of existentialism, we will focus on two members of what has been called the Philosophical School of Paris, namely Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. The study of Albert Camus' conception of the human condition and the absurd will lead us to the "Théâtre de l'Absurde" which we will approach through plays by Eugène Ionesco. Concepts such as, among others, suicide, "engagement", and the Other will be emphasized according to student interests.

Students will be asked to write short essays on the readings and to participate actively in class discussions.

Assigned works:

  • Jean-Paul Sartre: L'Existentialisme est un humanisme, La Nausée (excerpts), Les Mouches, Le Mur.
  • Albert Camus:Le Myth de Sisyphe (excerpts), Caligula, L'Étranger.
  • Simone de Beauvoir: Les Bouches inutiles, excerpts from Le Sang des autres and from Tous les hommes sont mortels.
  • Eugène IonescoLa Cantatrice chauve.
  • Film: Luis Puenzo's La Peste
  • Audio-visual materials: Interviews with Sartre, Camus and de Beauvoir.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Introduction to German Literature.

Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/grmrdgf02.htm

This course will introduce students to different literary genres, movements, and themes in German literature from Romanticism to the present. Readings will encompass select poems, five short stories or prose pieces, excerpts from four plays, and a novel by some of the leading writers in the German language. Throughout the course, we will be developing reading comprehension, critical analysis, verbal communication, and essay writing skills. In some cases, we will examine cinematic adaptations of these works. Students must have passed proficiency (or equivalent) since all readings and discussions will be in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 323. Russian Readings.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Russian Foodways.

Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency in Russian (by RC standards). (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rccore/323/001.nsf

"We are what we eat." Food is fundamental and instrumental in our lives. For the traveler, the table is one of the principal arenas for encounters with other cultures (after all, when we travel, we are always curious about menus, local dishes, the domestic table, and so on). But we also are how we eat, and the rituals, habits, economies, folklore, and cultural images of the table, the practices of food selection and preparation, the depiction of the table in high (and popular) culture are all significant elements in the creation of personal, regional, and national identity.

This course will examine the foodways of Russia, from the development of the Russian table to the practices and rituals of food preparation and consumption in Russia today. It will explore the semiotics of the table in Russian literature, folklore, film, and journalism, and will look at contemporary attitudes to food and eating. Students will learn what to expect when they eat and drink in Russia (and why), and will have the opportunity to emulate the habits of the Russian table, to participate in the preparation and enjoyment of an authentic Russian zastol'e, and to see the foodways of Russian Detroit. Students will be expected to participate actively in class, write six one-to-two-page response papers, and to complete a final project combining oral presentation and a six-to-eight-page paper. Readings include historical texts, belles lettres, journalism, culinary writing, tourist materials and travelers' tales, and folklore. There will be a small lab fee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001 De la diaspora al desplazamiento: Gitanos, inmigrantes africanos y latinoamericanos en la Espana contemporanea.

Instructor(s): Olga Maria López-Cotín (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

El hecho de que los gitanos hayan constituído por largo tiempo la "minoría étnica" en España no ha interferido con la prevalente noción de una identidad española homogénea. Sin embargo, como parte de un fenómeno de inmigración común en toda Europa, España ha experimentado un flujo creciente desde África y Latinoamérica en años recientes que desafía esta noción de homogeneidad cultural y confronta al país con su propia resistencia a la diferencia. Este curso se enfocará en el estudio de las fracturas y transformaciones que estos grupos marginales de antiguo y reciente asentamiento están provocando en la sociedad española contemporánea. El curso abordará la conflictiva historia e identidad cultural de los gitanos en España usándolas como paradigma para entender las manifestaciones actuales de xenofobia hacia los inmigrantes, así como las tensiones y violencia que han emergido. Indagaremos también la paradójica apropiación de sus manifestaciones artísticas tales como el uso de la música y el baile flamencos como iconos de la cultura española al tiempo que persisten políticas legales de segregación espacial y de confinamiento urbanos. Paralelamente, a medida que grupos inmigrantes no-blancos llegan a las fronteras legal o ilegalmente, el conflicto social se formula tanto en leyes de inmigración y medidas políticas concretas como en actitudes colectivas más elusivas y contradictorias. ¿Cuáles son los resultados de esos procesos de inmigración y desplazamiento cultural? ¿Cómo se integran o se segregan legal, cultural y espacialmente? ¿Qué culturas de ghetto se promueven y se subvierten? ¿Son permeables las fronteras?

Documentales y una serie de films recientes de Saura, Armendáriz y Gutiérrez Aragón entre otros complementarán otros materiales visuales y de lectura.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Taller de teatro latinoamericano.

Instructor(s): Beatriz E Ramirez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

En este curso se estudiarán las teorías teatrales más importantes del teatro latinoamericano en el siglo XX. El propósito de este curso es estudiar al teatro desde dos puntos de vista, como un agente de transformación social y como una propuesta estética. Com agente de tranformación social veremos cómo se ha utilizado para denunciar opresión y presentar soluciones a problemas sociales. Como propuesta estética veremos como el teatro se concibe no como un producto fijo y hecho proveniente de un autor sino como un proceso siempre cambiante de representación. Dentro de la idea del teatro como proceso está la premisa de que el teatro no se lee, se experimenta, ya sea como público o como participante. Por esta razón esta clase, además de discutir textos y teorías teatrales latinoamericanas, será un taller donde al final del curso se hará una representación teatral de uno de las obras discutidas. Los estudiantes que se matriculen en este curso deben estar dispuestos a participar en la producción de una obra de teatro. A diferencia de las producciones de teatro comerciales, ésta estará basada en la idea de Grotowsky en Hacia un teatro pobre, por lo tanto los únicos requisitos del curso serán la presencia del estudiante, las ganas de hacer teatro y el dominio del español a nivel de seminario subgraduado. Los textos que se utilizarán no serán muchos, para poder concentrarnos y estudiarlos bien. Nos centraremos en el libro de Rosa Luisa Márquez Brincos y saltos, y además leeremos parte (un capítulo o dos) de los siguientes libros:

Boal, Augusto. Técnicas latinoamericanas de teatro popular
Dragún, Osvaldo. Caminos del teatro latinoamericano.
Freire, Paolo. El teatro en la comunidad: instrumento de descolonización cultural.
Grotowsky, Jerzy. Hacia un teatro pobre.

Las obras para la clase serán:
Dragún, Osvaldo. Historias para ser contadas.
Sánchez, Luis Rafael. Antígona Pérez.
Triana, José. La noche de los asesinos.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 003 La mujer, modernidad y poder en Bolivia en el siglo XX.

Instructor(s): Zoya Khan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso explora la historia de Bolivia del siglo XX desde la perspectiva de la posición cambiante de la mujer. A partir de la trayectoria socio histórica, económica y cultural de la mujer boliviana examinaremos asuntos de etnia, de clase y finalmente cuestiones de poder que se han dado en Bolivia entre los años 1900y 1990, o sea el periodo que va desde la entrada de la modernidad hasta la época del neoliberalismo. La pregunta principal que investiga este curso es, ¿ Se puede entender los procesos de modernización y de modernidad en Bolivia enfocándose en la evolución de la posición mujer boliviana? Con este fin, estudiaremos la mujer boliviana desde dos ópticas principales: como objeto de representación y como sujeto de cambio. Las preguntas que guían nuestra lectura de la mujer boliviana como objeto de representación son, ¿ Cómo se ha usado la figura de la mujer tanto para indicar las jerarquías raciales como para anunciar su subversión en la sociedad boliviana? ¿Cómo se construyen las barreras entre el espacio publico y el espacio privado a partir del símbolo de la mujer? Para enfocarnos en la mujer boliviana como sujeto de cambio nos haremos dos preguntas globales: ¿Que aspectos de la realidad boliviana, tanto social como política resaltan y critican los textos de las escritoras bolivianas del siglo XX? ¿ De que manera ilumina, adapta y transforma los procesos de modernidad y de modernización en Bolivia, la participación de la mujer en los procesos socio-políticos allí, procesos que incluyen la protesta minera, la rebelión contra el racismo subyacente en la sociedad boliviana y la protesta colectiva contra la dictadura militar? A través de textos literarios, sociológicos, históricos, testimonios, películas y también análisis de pinturas, veremos cómo la actitud cambiante hacia la mujer tanto como su propia postura hacia los cambios sociales a la vez reflejan la historia de la nación boliviana y son elementos claves en la evolución misma de la modernidad ahí. Requisitos del curso incluyen participación en las discusiones de clase, una presentación de clase, tres ensayos cortos, y un trabajo final de investigación.

Textos:
Barrios de Chingara, Domitila. Si me permiten hablar.
Condori, Ana Maria. Mi despertar.
Costa du Rels, Adolfo. La miski simi.
Lara, Jesús. Yanakuna
Medinaceli, Carlos. La Chaskañawi
Rivera, Silvia & Zulema Lehm. Los artesanos libertarios y la ética del trabajo.
Scmukler, Alicia. La ciudad imaginaria: un análisis sociológico de la pintura contemporánea en Bolivia.
Películas
Cuestión de fe
Coraje del pueblo

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 Representing The Holocaust: From History to Story, Memory to Post Memory

Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Nazis intended to destroy all memory and physical trace of the genocide perpetrated against European Jewry and others deemed racially, genetically, socially, or politically undesirable. In its wake, however, the Holocaust has left a vast body of literature that bears witness to their crime against humanity. This literature demands an active moral, intellectual, and emotional engagement on the part of the reader who, in the process of reading, becomes a co-witness of sorts. In this course, we will be exploring the various forms this witnessing has taken over the last 50 years from personal testimonies, diaries, memoirs, and documentary films, to novels, poems, movies, musical compositions, paintings, and cartoons. How do recollections in the form of a memoir differ from those in a novel and what are the particular merits of each genre? We will discuss each of these representations in conjunction with historical texts, observing how autobiographical and imaginary accounts may enhance, transform, or complicate the historical document. Each text will be read closely with an attention to narrative voice, mood, and style. We will also draw on larger discussion in the fields of historiography, psychology, film, and literary criticism about the disruptive effect of trauma on memory and representation.

Textbooks:
Aharon Appelfeld; For Every Sin
Jurek Becker; Jacob the Liar
Charlotte Delbo; Auschwitz and After
Primo Levi; Survival in Auschwitz
Sara Nomberg-Przytyk; Auschwitz: True Tales from a Grotesque Land
Art Spiegelman; Maus I and II
Elie Wiesel; Night
Binjamin Wilkomirski; Fragments

Course Packet:
Includes poems by Celan, Pagis, Sachs, Kolmar; short stories by Fink, Borowski; essays by Amery, Adorno, Steiner, Lifton, Lang, Langer, Howe, Young, White, Friedlander, Laub, Fresco, Hartman, Appelfeld, Becker, Levi Cantor, Felman, Lanzmann.

All readings and discussions are in English. Students who read German, French, or Italian are encouraged to read some of the texts in the original.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 The Pleasure of the Text.

Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why Literature?

Why do we continue to read, write, and relish literary texts?

What are the profit margins of this enterprise?

This is what we will ask ourselves as we sample, enjoy, and scrutinize a select number of texts, which are distinctive of genre and recognized for their excellence. We will try to define the role of the poet-prophet and the storyteller in our midst. Together we will take the measure of the text by careful reading followed by open discussion. In the process we will develop our own understanding of genre, study the cohesion of message and form, discover the cunning narrative strategies, and savor the flavor of style. From this we will go on to examine texts which expand the boundaries of language, straddle two or more traditional literary forms, or initiate a new genre.

The term is divided into four workshops. During each workshop students are asked to bring in their own favorite poem, drama, or prose work for presentation to the group. In the case of drama, we will do some group presentations in the form of dramatic readings. We will also concern ourselves with the art of adaptation and see a film or two. In the course of our fourth workshop, we will address our initial question: "Why Pleasure?" in the light of our forgone experiences from the literature we will have studied. You will also be asked to do a limited amount of critical reading, spend additional time viewing film adaptations, attend dramatic performances, and prepare group workshops for in-class presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 405. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 409. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 410. Senior Project.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An individual project in the field of concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 489. Honors Independent Research.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study under the supervision of an honors thesis advising committee to do preliminary research for a potential honors thesis. A primary purpose of this course is to determine if, in fact, the proposed thesis is feasible.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 490. Honors Thesis.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An individual honors project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for RCCORE.


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