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Fall Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 5:19 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


RCHUMS 214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Growing Up Near the Great Lakes.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth N Goodenough (lizgoode@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How have human beings from the Great Lakes chosen to present themselves and the stories of their lives? What motivates a person to write about "the third coast"? This course examines a variety of short narratives and novels from classic works of the great outdoors and the motor city to historical sagas of frontier life and such popular forms as mysteries, romances, folktales, and children's fables. Looking at storytelling as a reflection of social values and as a mode of seeing, we will examine the particular images and patterns of thinking and becoming which populate fictional works set in Michigan and its environs. What stage of development or type of experience is formative and which provide the most useful lens from which to view diversity in the peninsula state? What is the impact of gender, nationality, and race on this region's constructions of selfhood? How do writers from the Great Lakes invent the impossible and make up stories about stories within stories? How do we decide what these stories mean? Authors include Harriet Arnow, Charles Baxter, Joan Blos, Christopher Paul Curtis, Marguerite De Angeli, Sharon Dilworth, Jeffery Eugenides, Hannah Green, Judith Guest, Jim Harrison, Ernest Hemingway, Phillip Levine, Alice Munro, Zibby Oneal, and Robert Traver.

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RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

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RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

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RCHUMS 222. Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individualized instruction, group discussion, and readings aim at the development of original story ideas and the perfection of narrative techniques relevant to the authorship of children's books. Preliminary assignments picture book, folklore-narrative, and media prepare each student for a self-directed final project.

No prerequisites necessary. However, a thorough reading background in children's books or the willingness to compensate for its lack is presumed. Please do not take this course expecting "lectures" about children's books or child development. This is a writing course emphasizing story-writing skills and aesthetics.

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RCHUMS 236 / FILMVID 236. The Art of the Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 236.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for section 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

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RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Pursuit of a Legacy: Landmarks in Russo-Soviet Music and Ballet.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Schwartz-Bishir (raschwar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rchums/251/001.nsf

Russia was far behind her neighbors at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Compared to Germany, France, and Italy, there was little if any concert music or ballet of Russian origin. Connoisseurship focused largely on Western European music and theatrical dance, and these foreign artistic traits were passed from one generation of servant-performers to the next. How, then, by the middle of the twentieth century did this country's status change from artistic spectator to influential player? Who were its pioneers, what were their achievements, and what is the canon that has become the Russo-Soviet legacy? What is it about the combination of dance and music that is significant to the artistic validity of the Russians?

To answer these questions, this course will examine concert music and ballet of the Russian and Soviet orbit form the Romantic era to the middle of the twentieth century. Stylistic features that mark pieces as distinctly Russian, or Soviet, will be examined. In addition to a broad survey of the pieces of this period, selected complete works of the canon will receive in-depth focus. Artists will be considered for their individual merits as well as for their historical, cultural, theoretical, and philosophical significance. Achievements of Russo-Soviet composers, and those numerous individuals who have contributed to ballet, will be contextualized in light of developments in Western European music and theatrical dance. The importance of music and ballet to the Russian people will be discussed. Ultimately, the accomplishments of the Russo-Soviet schools of music and ballet will be considered for their long-term impact at home and in the West.

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RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Residential College Singers.

Instructor(s): Brandon Jeremy Brack

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RCHUMS 254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument.

Music

Section 001 BASIC TECHNIQUE FOR SINGERS AND ACTORS AND THE ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE.

Instructor(s): Jane R Heirich (jheirich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to students who want to develop their voices for speaking and singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed towards singers (with or without previous vocal training), speech and acting students, and those who want to find out if they can sing. Most voices are undeveloped or under-developed; and we can learn how to develop our vocal equipment for whatever our own purpose. Because our voices are housed within us, we must consider the whole voice-body-mind as the subject of our study.

Ms. Heirich is a STAT and AmSAT certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, and this work will inform all that we do in the course. The class meets together on Mondays and Fridays from 1-3 P.M. Your schedules should TEMPORARILY remain flexible between 12-6 on Wednesdays for scheduling of small group sessions. This scheduling will be completed by the end of the first class meeting.

There will be one required text, some optional readings, daily preparation, and an individual or team project required. LS&A guidelines for 4-credit courses expect 3 hours of work per credit hour, hence, you should be prepared accordingly. With more than 4 hours in "class" (a weekly average of 6.25 hours, which includes the small group and individual lessons), there will be proportionally less expected of you outside of class. The required reading will be Miracles Usually Can't Be Learned, a basic vocal text by Jane Heirich, available as a course pack.

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RCHUMS 260 / DANCE 220. The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history, criticism and aesthetics. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth- and twentieth-century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film.

Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris.

Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet and we will also read some dance critics including Gautier, Levinson, Martin, and Croce. No prerequisites.

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RCHUMS 275. The Western Mind in Revolution: Six Interpretations of the Human Condition.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will treat six major reinterpretations of the human condition from the 16th to the 20th centuries generated by intellectual revolutions in astronomy (Copernicus: the heliocentric theory) theology (Luther: the Reformation), biology (Darwin: evolution of the species), sociology (Marx: Communism), psychology (Freud: psychoanalysis), and physics (Einstein: the theory of relativity).

All six reinterpretations initiated a profound revaluation of Western concept of the self as well as a reassessment of the nature and function of his/her political and social institutions. Since each of these revolutions arose in direct opposition to some of the most central and firmly accepted doctrines of their respective ages, we will study:

  1. how each thinker perceived the particular "truth" he sought to communicate;
  2. the problems entailed in expressing and communicating these truths; and
  3. the traumatic nature of the psychological upheaval caused by these cataclysmic transitions from the past to the future both on the personal and cultural level.

If the function of humanistic education is to enable the individual to see where he/she stands in today's maelstrom of conflicting intellectual and cultural currents, it is first necessary to see where others have stood and what positions were abandoned. The emphasis of this course will not be upon truths finally revealed or upon problems forever abandoned, but rather upon certain quite definite perspectives that, arising out of specific historical contexts, at once solved a few often technical problems within a specialized discipline while unexpectedly creating many new ones for Western culture as a whole.

Texts:

  • Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Bodies (1543);
  • Luther, Appeal to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation (1520), Of the Liberty of a Christian Man (1520);
  • Darwin, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859);
  • Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts (1844), Das Kapital (1867, 1885, 1894);
  • Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905); and
  • Einstein, Relativity, the Special and the General Theory: A Popular Exposition (1921).
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RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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RCHUMS 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 Image of the American Family.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This text based performance course will focus on one of the central themes in American Drama - the relationship of the family. In doing so we will not only look at some of the major plays of the century by writers like Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Eugene O'Neill, but we will also go on to look at more contemporary playwrights and more current issues in American playwriting - the perspectives of women writers, African American, Asian, and Hispanic writers, and writers from the Gay and Lesbian community. The emphasis will be on the exploration of these texts through extensive scene study. No prerequisite is required but previous active experience is recommended.

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RCHUMS 290. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Twentieth Century.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Nicholas Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the twentieth century, many artists, writers, and filmmakers have attempted to defamiliarize everyday reality make it strange or "uncanny." Often, their justification for this defamiliarization practice was that it was a means to get audiences to think about the changeable nature of both the audience's world and themselves.

After examining the concept of defamiliarization in the formalist criticism of Victor Shklovsky and the idea of the uncanny in the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud, this seminar will explore the development of an aesthetics of the uncanny in European art, literature, and film between 1916 and 1939. In its second half, this seminar will explore the reception of uncanny aesthetics in European and American culture since the 1980s.

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RCHUMS 313 / SLAVIC 313. Russian Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 002 ONLY satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 313.001.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rchums/325/004.nsf

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Arts & Ideas of South & Southeast Asia.

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

South and Southeast Asia historically have produced some of the world's most highly evolved, diverse, and richly complex civilizations. In the twentieth century the countries of this region have been greatly influenced by the ideas, technology, and political power of the West. How have these countries re-conceptualized their cultures, accommodating to or rejecting Western views? This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of twentieth century writers, musicians, and dancers as they come into contact with Western ideas. Some ancient artistic forms that have been transformed in this century will also be investigated. This is an interdisciplinary course with several of the lectures provided by faculty specialists in South and Southeast Asian history, literature, and film. It is not a survey course. The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with significant and representative texts or musical sounds that have been produced by South and Southeast Asia artists as they have struggled to re-evaluate and re-create their cultures. This course will focus primarily on India, Thailand, and Indonesia. Introductory lectures and films on South and Southeast Asian history and culture will be followed by in-depth discussion of The God of Small Things, a Satyajit Ray film, bharata natyam dance, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer's Child of All Nations, among others.

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RCHUMS 347(451) / RUSSIAN 347. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 347.001.

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RCHUMS 387. Renaissance Drama.

Drama

Section 001 Commedia delle'arte.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A theater historical introduction to the commedia dell'arte (the improvised, masked comedy of the Italian Renaissance) leading to a practical workshop in this performance mode. Practical work will begin with the early comedies of Moliére (and period English imitations of commedia dell'arte farces), and proceed to excercises in mask-work, comic movement, and verbal dexterity. Over the course of the term students will develop their own variations of two of the traditional characters Pantalone, Arlecchino, Brighella, Columbina, il Dotore, il Capitano, the Lovers (male and female), etc. and create a repertory of lazzi (comic "business"), burla (verbal jokes), songs, and stories, toward a partial realization of a 16th-century scenario as an end-of-term show.

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RCHUMS 390. Special Period and Place Drama.

Drama

Section 001 Modern Irish Drama, 1898-2000.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of 20th century Irish Drama beginning with the pioneering works of the "Irish Dramatic Movement" (Yeats, Synge, and Lady Gregory) in the first years of the century, through the works of O'Casey in the 20s and beyond to the second flourishing of Irish drama in the 60s onward with such figures as Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, and Tom Murphy to Martin McMonagh and a host of other new playwrights of the 1990s. This course will be equally divided between lecture/discussion (with attention paid to Irish mythology, folklore, history, politics) and practical work on scenes (with workshops in verse-speaking, grotesque comedy, Irish accents, etc.). Requirements include a midterm exam, individual research into playwright not covered in the syllabus, and participation in an End-of-Term show presenting very recent work(s) from such exciting new playwrights as Marina Carr, Conor Mc Pherson, or Mark O'Rowe.

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RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Nietzsche's Last Year: Final Vision and Mental Collapse.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1888, perceiving that his mental life was fast approaching its end, Nietzsche completed his last six works in a frenzy of intellectual creativity: The Wagner Case, Twilight of the Idols, The Anti-Christ, Nietzsche contra Wagner, Dithyrambs of Dionysus, and Ecce Homo. These surprisingly lucid and coherent final works summarize Nietzsche's philosophic mission and represent its culmination. This course examines these final works to reveal the psychological coherence and intellectual virtuosity that informed Nietzsche's philosophic career from his earliest writings to his complete collapse into insanity on January 3, 1889.

Nietzsche regarded himself as a cultural bomb-thrower, whose task was to explode the most deeply cherished and admired ideals and institutions of Western civilization, which, he believed, fed upon and generated intellectual atrophy, emotional exhaustion, and moral degeneration. As the self-appointed physician to a thoroughly decadent culture, Nietzsche set himself the task of diagnosing the nature of the illness, revealing its historical origins, and suggesting a radical cure in the form of the Superman. To this end, he posited the purely "this-worldly" ideal of the autonomous individual who lives beyond all moral strictures and generalizing definitions of the good, the normal, the natural, and the healthy conceptual frameworks imposed by the Christian church, the democratic state, modern science, and bourgeois psychology all designed to reduce and thus control the inner life, which he valued precisely because of its complexity and Dionysian energies.

No previous knowledge of Nietzsche is required. The seminar will begin by investigating his posthumously edited and published work The Will to Power, in order to define and summarize Nietzsche's earlier philosophic investigations - the advent of nihilism, the death of God and metaphysics, and the rise of moral relativity. This seminar offers participants the opportunity to test the viability of Nietzsche's new and experimental design for living: can a radical form of purely secular redemption be achieved by the self-affirming individual driven by the "Will to Power" to create a personal meaning in a meaningless world?

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RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 002 The Hero as Outsider, Outcast or Outlaw.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we try to define the human need for heroes and the (changing) character of heroism by examining the eccentric hero that mainstream society attempts to suppress, dismiss, ignore, or condemn because it regards him or her as perverse, subversive, vicious, or beyond the pale of tolerance: the saint, criminal, psychotic, visionary, egoist, pervert, or monster. Some of the works we may read or see are Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses; St. Exupery's Night Flight; E. Baine's A Lesson Before Dying; J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness; Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night; F. Dostoyevsky's Notes from the Underground; Bertolt Brecht's Galileo; Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood; Martin Ritt's The Front (with Woody Allen); Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 482. Drama Interpretation II: Performance Workshop.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280 and either RCHUMS 282 or playwriting. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Introduction to Performance Studies: Performance and the Politics of Identity. Meets with Theatre and Drama 399.001 and Art 454.002.

Instructor(s): Holly Hughes

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, RCHUMS 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/artdes/454/002.nsf

"Identity." "Diversity." "Multiculturalism:" Though controversial buzzwords in 2002, each of these seemingly contemporary categories have a long and tangled history in American cultural life, marking the treacherous fault-line where art and politics collide into a central question of what it means to be American. Even as recent scholarship has challenged our basic assumptions about identity, suggesting that race, gender and sexuality are culturally constructed fictions in other words, kinds of performances these categories have remained hotly contested. Using the lens of Performance Studies to examine the aesthetic and political dimensions of identity, we'll look at the work of artists like Anna Deavere Smith, Split Britches, and Carmelita Tropicana, as well as theorists such as Jose Munoz and Stuart Hall. We'll also compare the performances of identity in Mexico and Europe by artists such as Jesusa Rodriguez and Orlan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Pontius Pilate in Medieval Drama. (2 Credits)

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When faced with a crowd's demand that he order Christ's crucifixion, Pontius Pilate washed his hands and proclaimed his own innocence in the matter. His character in history devolves from the ambiguities of this action, and those ambiguities provide rich fodder for early dramatic representations of the scene. In the medieval mystery plays about Christ's Passion, for instance, he can appear as a cunning and treacherous representative of the devil, or as a man struggling to reconcile his conscience with his official duties. One play focuses on his loving, amorous relationship with his wife. He is, then, available for a tremendous range of dramatic statements about proper and improper uses of power, about religious identity, and about the perplexities of moral consciousness.

In this course, we will read the mystery plays in which he appears, including selections in Middle English from the York and Chester cycles, Wakefield plays (a pseudo-cycle), and the N-Town Passion. We will also workshop performances of scenes from these plays, investigating the practical theatrical issues they raise. This course is a collaboration between Martin Walsh, who will lead the theatrical side of the course, and Theresa Tinkle, who will structure the literature study. Our exploration of Pilate will be further informed by the residency of Michael Boyd of the Royal Shakespeare Company, who will, in the course of the term, be creating a script about Pontius Pilate for the stage. Some students from this and several other courses will have the opportunity to work with Boyd on that project, and what they learn with him will enrich our examination of medieval drama.

Required work for the course will include such activities as discussion of the literature; performance in selected scenes (both in Middle English and modernizations); development of a production design "sketch" based on period art works, visual images of the Passion, and staging conditions; some informal writing activities; and a short essay. Students will be able to choose among these theatrical and literary projects, according to their backgrounds and inclinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 Topic? (credits?)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated four times, for a total of four credits. Can be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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