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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies


This page was created at 7:04 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



ACABS 100 / AAPTIS 100 / HJCS 100 / HISTORY 132. Peoples of the Middle East.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu) , Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://cgi.www.umich.edu/~nes100/F03/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 200 / AAPTIS 200 / HJCS 200 / RELIGION 201. Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001 — Religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu) , Alexander D Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu) , Yaron Z Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/religion/201/001.nsf

This course serves two main functions: the first of these is to provide an introductory sense of what is involved in the academic study of religion; the second, which will occupy almost the whole term, is to introduce the major religious traditions of the Near East, with emphasis on the development and major structures of Israelite Religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will keep two foci in view: one will have to do with the historical development of these religious traditions, their sacred texts and major personalities; the second will involve a comparative view of these traditions by analyzing their sense of the sacred in space, time, and text, their views on holy people. This is an introductory course: it is not necessary for students to have any previous experience in the study of religion. The course consists of three weekly lectures and a discussion group. Writing for the course typically involves an essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 201. Intermediate Classical Hebrew, I.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001 — MEETS With ACABS 601.001.

Instructor(s): Brian B Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 102. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the literature of the Hebrew Bible. Texts representing different literary genres and dating from different periods will be read in the original. Students will be introduced to the history of the text of the Hebrew Bible and the problems of its translation and interpretation. Special emphasis will be placed on refining the student's knowledge of Biblical Hebrew through the study of Hebrew syntax. Required books are (1) a copy of the Biblical Hebraica, and (2) a dictionary of classical Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

ACABS 291. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 — Magic in the Ancient World and in the Bible.

Instructor(s): Brian B Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What role does magic play in religious life? How has the Bible impacted modern notions about magic and magic's relation to religion? The ancient cultures of the Middle East and those of the eastern Mediterranean provided the context for the production of the Bible and these together have greatly influenced modern, Western notions about the relationship of magic and religion. As a means of exploring these and related topics, the course, Magic in the Ancient World and in the Bible, offers the student the opportunity to engage in a series of studies on magic across several centuries and various ancient cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

ACABS 307 / GREEK 307. The Synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke.

Courses in Greek

Section 001 — Course is taught in Greek.

Instructor(s): Traianos Gagos (traianos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GREEK 102; and permission of instructor. Taught in Greek. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Greek 307.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 323 / RELIGION 350. Christianity after the New Testament: The First Six Centuries.

New Testament

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Megan Williams (mhwillia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the history and literatures of the Christian churches in the Mediterranean and Near Eastern Worlds, from the second through the sixth centuries, from the close of the New Testament through the coming of Islam. We will trace the rise of orthodox theologies and church institutions, while attending to the persistence of multiple Christianities throughout the period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 382 / HISTART 382 / ANTHRARC 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Ancient Egypt: Culture Courses

Section 001 — Meets with ACABS 686.001.

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses specifically on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from ca. 3200 bc–285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes will be explored, and specific sites, some well-known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids), some less well-known (such as the town of Karanis and the city of Kerma), will be investigated as examples of different kinds of interpretive problems in archaeology. The course also will introduce a consideration of theoretical approaches to Nile Valley archaeological data and the ways in which they articulate with other sources of information.

While it is complementary in subject matter to ACABS 281, which concentrates on the history of ancient Egypt of the Dynastic period through texts, this course is designed to stand alone. Course grade is based on midterm, final, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 393 / AAPTIS 393 / RELIGION 393. The Religion of Zoroaster.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 393.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 395. Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings.

General ACABS

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 411. Introduction to Akkadian.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the literary language of the Babylonians and Assyrians. In the first term (this course) the basics of Akkadian grammar will be presented. There will be weekly homework exercises and in-class recitation. Individual tutoring may be organized as needed. There will also be an introduction to cuneiform signs, the script of the ancient texts. The course grade is based on in-class recitations and a number of exams, including a final exam. (The second term of this course progresses to reading of ancient myths from Mesopotamia in the original language and signs.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 413 / ANTHRARC 442 / HISTORY 440. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Culture Course

Section 001 — Meets with ACABS 513.001. Graduate students elect ACABS 513.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/acabs/413/002.nsf

This course will survey Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first written documents (ca. 3100 BC) to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire (539 BC). Special attention will be paid to the following topics of social and political organization: the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian states; economy in Mesopotamia (redistribution and markets); rural and urban relations; Mesopotamian law; Babylonian and Assyrian relations; Mesopotamia and its neighbors (Israel and Persia); the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization. Examination of texts in translation and of archaeological materials will be presented in section in addition to discussion of lectures and readings. One textbook and course pack of readings will be the course's texts.

Course grade is based on one short essay (1500 words), one hour exam, a final exam, and a term paper (5000 words minimum).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 415. Elementary Hittite.

Mesopotamian and Hittite Studies: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will present the basics of Hittite grammar through lectures, student recitation, and reading exercises in transliteration. We will acquaint ourselves with the cuneiform writing system and consider the ramifications of the adoption of this script by the Hittites for the recovery of the linguistic realities of ancient Anatolia. Attention will be given to the role of Hittite within the Indo-European family of languages. Textbook: Theo P.J. van den Hout, Neshili: A Hittite Primer.

Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students whose concentration is in Near Eastern Studies, Linguistics, and Classics.

Attendance at lectures and participation in classroom discussion and recitation. Quizzes, midterm and final exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 421 / RELIGION 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilizations.

New Testament

Section 001 — Christianity, Judaism, and Hellenistic Civilizations and Religions.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected themes in the study of early Christianity against the background of Hellenistic culture: the sources and analogues of the gospels, common themes in early Christian and Greco-Roman thought and the intellectual matrix of Christian doctrine are examined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 429 / GREEK 489. Letters of Paul in Greek.

New Testament: Courses in Greek

Section 001 — Letter to the Romans.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One to two years Greek; and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the philological and theological analysis of the Letter to the Romans, read in the original Greek text. The course aims to overcome any simplistic contraposition between Hellenism and Judaism and instead to read the theology of Paul within the diverse world of Second Temple Judaism. At the time of Paul, the Jesus movement was still a messianic Jewish sect emerging from Enochic Judaism and competing with other Jewish sects, namely, Hellenistic Judaism and Pharisaic Judaism. The seminar format will require oral presentations and a final paper. Only students who have an advanced knowledge of NT Greek will be admitted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ACABS 483. Aramaic, I.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Hawley

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Aramaic language is one of the most important for the study of the Ancient Near East, not only because of its long history, but also because of its official status during certain periods in the administration, politics, and religions of the region.

This course prepares students to read and analyze Aramaic texts. The initial emphasis will be placed on "Biblical Aramaic" (portions of the books of Daniel and Ezra), which contains not only the ancient consonantal text (ancient Aramaic writing uses comparatively few vowel signs) but also a reliable medieval vocalization. This will prepare the way for reading "unvocalized" texts from a variety of genres and periods: early monumental inscriptions on stone and legal documents written on clay tablets from the northern Levant, abundant papyri of the Persian period from Egypt, and ostraca (pottery shards that carry inscriptions) and parchment scrolls of the Hellenistic and Roman periods from the Judean Desert (including " the Dead Sea Scrolls").

The textbook will be F. Rosenthal, A Grammar of Biblical Aramaic, 6th revised edition, Porta Linguarum Orientalium 5 (Harrassowitz, 1995). Other periods of the language will be covered by handouts distributed in class. Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class, and performance on occasional quizzes and final exam. Prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew is helpful, but not required. Dates, times, and place of meeting to be announced. Feel free to ask any questions-email them to rchawley@uchicago.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 491. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 — Divine Kingship in Ancient Egypt.

Instructor(s): Ellen Morris (morrisel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/acabs/491/001.nsf

  • How does a mortal become elevated to the status of god on earth?
  • How are inevitable human failings reconciled with the ideal of divine perfection?
  • What do you do, for example, with a god who is all too obviously a tempestuous human child? A god who cannot seem to end a drought or cure a plague?
  • What happens when a god dies or, even worse, is murdered?

Sacred kingship must by nature grapple with such difficult and perplexing questions. In this seminar, we will explore these problems utilizing pharaonic Egypt as an in-depth case study. In addition, throughout the academic term we will look outside of Egypt for comparative purposes at divine kingships in Africa, the Andes, Mesoamerica, and Europe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 491. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 002 — Sacred Space in Graeco-Roman Palestine: The Case of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Meets with JUDAIC 591.001 and HJCS 491.001.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Religion has always been inseparable from holy sites. One of the most famous among the sacred spaces is the flat, trapezoidal, walled compound located on the eastern edge of Jerusalem's Old City, commonly known as the Temple Mount. For centuries this site has been revered by Near Eastern monotheistic religions, most notably by Judaism and Islam, but also Christianity. The history of the Temple Mount is intrinsically fascinating. Inherent in the numerous ancient documents and artifacts is a story of a physical space that achieved greatness, a cluster of images that inspired generations and a concept of the sacred. The current seminar will investigate this phenomenon through a multi-disciplinary approach; we will analyze literary material as well as archaeological and artistic artifacts in an attempt to better understand the political, cultural, and religious dynamics that shaped the figure of the Temple Mount. No previous knowledge is necessary; all material will be provided in English translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of ACABS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ACABS 581. Ugaritic, I.

Ancient Israel/Hebrew Bible: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Hawley

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Ugaritic texts from Ras Shamra on the Mediterranean coast of Syria provide the earliest well attested example of the institutionalized and widespread use of alphabetic writing. Over 2000 Ugaritic texts are known, written in a "cuneiform" (wedge-shaped) script, and new discoveries continue on an almost yearly basis. This course will prepare students to read and analyze texts written in Ugaritic, seeking also to foster a basic appreciation of the nature and diversity of Ugaritic literature: myths, rituals, incantations, "scientific" manuals, letters, and administrative documents, and several other genres.

The "textbook" will consist of handouts distributed in class. Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class, and performance on occasional quizzes and the final exam. Prior knowledge of Arabic, Hebrew, or Akkadian is helpful, but not required. Dates, times, and place of meeting to be announced. Feel free to ask any questions, email them to rchawley@uchicago.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 585. Advanced Middle Egyptian.

Ancient Egypt: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Martin Fisher (djoser@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 486. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course continues the study of Middle Egyptian beyond the first year by exposing students to the historical texts of the Middle and New Kingdom (1040-1050 BCE). Students will read a selection of modern editions and facsimiles from the originals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 592. Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 003 — Archives, Libraries, and Literacy in Ancient Mesopotamia.

Instructor(s): Piotr A Michalowski (piotrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~piotrm/syllabi.html

In this seminar, we will investigate the organization of writing in the world's first truly literate culture: ancient Mesopotamia (roughly from 3200 BCE to the first century of the common era). The work will focus on the remains of archives from private houses, larger organizations and the state as well as on private, temple, and royal literary libraries. The discussion will focus on the role of literacy and archives in society utilizing both textual and archaeological evidence and attempt to incorporate this data into the broader cross-cultural debate on literacy. Readings will include theoretical papers as well as a broad array of studies from other times and other places. Students will be asked to read and report on such studies, present class presentations, and write a final research paper. Because of the cross-cultural and interdisciplinary nature of the course, students who work on other cultures will be very much welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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