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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 6:52 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


Anthropology Waitlist/Override Procedures

For courses that are closed and do not maintain waitlists on wolverine access:

      If the course has discussions sections, attend the first class meeting and ask for an override
    • If the course does not have discussion sections, contact the instructor.


      ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

      Introductory Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/101/001.nsf

      This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts and methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and a short paper.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

      Introductory Courses

      Section 026.

      Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/101/026.nsf

      This introductory course surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically.

      Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the arts; and medicine. Required readings come from one introductory text, a case studies book and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Three multiple choice exams each cover one-third of the course. The third exam is given on the last day of class. There will be several quizzes and short writing assignments due in section.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

      Introductory Courses

      Section 001 — Anthropology of the Bible.

      Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

      First-Year Seminar

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course explores the Bible and biblically inspired religions from the comparative perspective of anthropology. We will examine case studies of archaeological, historical, and contemporary societies in which biblical books were and are read, exploring how key themes are expressed, translated, reinterpreted and relived in new social, cultural, and material circumstances. In the process, students will become acquainted with anthropological methods of documentation and analysis used in cross-cultural research.

      Assignments will include: weekly discussion papers (~ 1 page in length) on the reading; two short research papers (5-7pp) due in the 5th and 8th weeks; and one longer research paper (10-15pp), due in the last week of class. Students (probably in groups of 2-3) will also be responsible for making oral presentations and leading one or two discussions of the reading during the academic term. Grades will be based on the assignments and on class participation. Readings: The required books will be available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 State Street) and on reserve in the Shapiro Undergraduate Library. Required articles will be on electronic reserve at Shapiro and available as a course pack.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

      Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

      Section 001 — Culture and Medicine. (Honors).

      Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      In this seminar, we will examine the ways in which health and illness are both constructed out of, and interpreted within, cultural settings. Focusing on Western biomedicine, we will discuss a broad range of illness experiences — from schizophrenia to cancer, post-traumatic stress disorder to asthma, Tourette's to Alzheimer's, among others — to address a number of questions currently central to medical anthropology. Topics may include (but will not be limited to) the meaning and alteration of self and personhood in illness; the ways in which medical knowledge is produced and imagined, the culture of science and technology, immunity and risk, illness narrative, and social and historical views of the body. Classes will be discussion based, with students expected to prepare for active participation and leadership in discussion. Requirements include written reading critiques and a final group project. This course is not open to first-year students.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

      Introductory Courses

      Section 001 — Folk Heroes and Historical Martyrs. Meets with History 195.005.

      Instructor(s): Jennifer Gaynor (jgaynor@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be elected for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See History 195.005.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 309. Anthropology of Europe.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing; introductory anthropology recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The course will examine studies, issues, and debates in the vast field of European ethnology. Key concerns will be:

      • what are the boundaries of European anthropology and a concept called "Europe"?
      • How have anthropologists made intellectual decisions in the midst of global and local transformations, and given the explosion of cross-cultural interactions in and around the continent?
      • Can we talk about a tradition of European anthropology and any kind of common identity among its practitioners? [Witness the active existence of such organizations as the European Association of Social Anthropologists].
      • Are European anthropologists necessarily European?
      • Does the region studied have to be formally designated as Europe?
      • What kinds of regional hierarchies exist within the discipline of anthropology?
      • Finally, how do recent shifting identities, outbreaks of hate-mongering in parts of Europe, and so-called postmodern and postcolonial problems affect anthropological practices in the region?

      These and many other problems of European identity and culture will be discussed in this seminar. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, successful completion of readings, a term paper, and two take-home exams.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 314 / AMCULT 313. Cuba and its Diaspora.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001 — Meets with Institute for the Humanities 311.001.

      Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/314/001.nsf

      This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for thirty-five years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 315 / AMCULT 316. Native American Peoples of North America.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/315/001.nsf

      Native American communities, often deeply rooted in traditional places and voices — despite relocations and losses of native languages — all involve strong family ties and histories of local and regional power struggles. In this course, we look at cross cultural dynamics and tribal identities in political encounters between Native American peoples and various others: developers, environmentalists, educators, other governmental authorities, poets, and social scientists, to name a few. Key issues include land rights, family relations, alcoholism, and freedom of religion. We also look at contemporary Native American fiction, non-fiction, and film documentaries as cultural forces which challenge others' constructions of who Native American peoples are. A recurrent question: what are the limits and possibilities of self-definition for Native American peoples, in what circumstances?

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 319. Latin American Society and Culture.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course examines the cultures and societies of contemporary Latin America, a vast and varied region with more than twenty countries spread over one and a half continents that have developed over more than 500 years of history. We will cultivate an awareness of the particularities of local ways of life while searching for shared themes and histories that in some ways unite the many societies of this vast region. Topics covered include: race, ethnicity, and national identity; indigenous rights and citizenship; religion and religious change; gender issues; class and economic development; and immigrant communities within Latin America. As a student, you will be expected to keep up with reading and writing assignments and to participate actively in lectures and discussion sections. By the end of this course you should have a grasp of the various countries and regions that make up Latin America; the most important social divisions within those regions; and the nature of current developments in Latin American societies. This is an introductory course on the region, with no prerequisites other than a desire to learn new things. Grades will be based on participation, essays, and exams.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 325 / WOMENSTD 324. Childbirth & Culture.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/325/001.nsf

      This course examines childbirth from an anthropological perspective, focusing on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth not only provides the basis for an understanding of the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs, but also expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and on the medicalisation of childbirth. The course considers a range of childbirth-related topics including conception, the birthing process, childbirth rituals, postpartum care of mothers and newborns, fathers' participation, miscarriage and infant mortality, changing childbirth practices, and the politics of childbirth relating to hospitalization and reproductive technologies. The course — using reading and videos from studies of childbirth in African, Asian, European, Latin American, and North American societies — will be evaluated through one short paper, class participation, and a midterm and a final exam (with the option of a research paper).

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 329 / PSYCH 415. The Anthropology of Childhood: Growing Up in Culture.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/329/001.nsf

      Children don't speak, think, and behave like adults. Nor do people everywhere share the same ideas about what childhood is or should be. Anthropology is largely the enterprise of documenting and interpreting what differences in speech, thought, and behavior mean. How has childhood been conceived in different cultures and historical epochs? What implications do different notions of childhood have for the developmental pathways of children themselves? To what extent do children resemble each other across cultural and historical divides? How do children acquire knowledge of the cultures in which they live? This lecture/discussion course draws on anthropological research, from Mead's work in the South Pacific to contemporary studies in both complex and small-scale societies, and permits us to formulate answers to these and related questions. Course requirements: weekly journal of notes and queries, active classroom participation, two exams (short answer/essay).

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 330. Culture, Thought, and Meaning.

      Ethnology-Theory/Method

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is an intensive, upper-division introduction to Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Studies. Concentrators and non-concentrators are welcome; the course is closed to Freshmen. The course introduces students to the closely interrelated concepts of "culture," "thought" and "meaning" as they are used in anthropology. Despite its centrality to the discipline of anthropology, "culture" has proved to be a highly inconsistent concept over time. This course traces the consequences of different concepts of culture from the early nineteenth century through the present and their relation to thought and meaning. It is organized around debates in anthropology about structure, interpretation, cognition, metaphor, practice, personhood, gender, the body, and place. Students have the opportunity to explore cultural difference by reading widely about other cultures, from the Trobriand Islands to the Caribbean, and to apply what they learn to their own cultural circumstances.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 333. Non-Western Legal Systems, I.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The nature, function, and development of law. Law and society. Problems of social control: why is law obeyed in societies without courts and in societies with courts. Dispute settlement procedures and the judicial process; civil and criminal law; principles of liability for legal wrongs; women, class and community; the impact of Western law on customary, tribal, or aboriginal law. Case studies from Africa, Middle East, Asia, Europe, the Americas. A good introduction to comparative law from an anthropological perspective. Requirements: four 3-5 page papers, or three 6-8 page student papers. Lecture/discussion format.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 346(416) / HISTORY 347. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001 — Meets with History 478.001.

      Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/347/001.nsf

      See History 347.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 374(472) / LING 374. Language and Culture.

      Ethnology-Theory/Method

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course explores the wide variety of ways in which language and culture are related to one another. Since language reflects cultural patterns and values, it offers powerful insights into the meaningful worlds in which people live, think, and act. Being a medium for communication, expressiveness, and interaction, language also plays a crucial role in cultural and social change.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

      Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

      Honors Ethnology.

      Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ANTHRCUL 399), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/398/001.nsf

      This honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      ANTHRCUL 402. Chinese Society and Cultures.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001 — The Anthropology of Twentieth-Century China.

      Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The twentieth century was a time of enormous change in mainland China: two revolutions, civil war, famine, cultural upheaval, and many episodes of massive economic, social, and political restructuring. What was life like in the twentieth century for farmers, urban people, men and women, and ethnic and cultural minorities? What are their lives like today? What were experiences of sex, food, work, religion, and family life, and how have these experiences been transformed? In the last five years, a new anthropological literature on China has begun to probe these questions in rich detail. We explore this literature in this seminar to build an understanding of daily life for China's diverse populations through the twentieth century and today. We also examine questions of method: how best can we study and understand the historical transformations of daily life? Students will participate actively in class, lead a class discussion, and write one short review paper and one research paper.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 414 / CAAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 415. Andean Civilization.

      Ethnology-Regional Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in Anthropology. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/415/001.nsf

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This medical anthropology course explores the field of global health, particularly the serious health problems facing Third World populations. The course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in international health over the past three decades, as well as in-depth case studies of four nations (Nepal, Haiti, Mali, Egypt). Five major areas of focus include:

      1. the history of international health development and bureaucracies;
      2. the political ecology of infectious disease;
      3. child survival;
      4. women's reproductive health; and
      5. men's health under "modernization."

      The underlying purpose of the course is to develop students' awareness of the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems in so-called "developing" nations and the consequent difficulties of developing effective long-term solutions.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

      Ethnology-Theory/Method

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

      ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 001 — The Colonial Order of Things in SE Asia. Meets with HISTORY 472.001.

      Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This seminar on the cultures of colonialism in Southeast Asia is not a regional course. We'll focus on the colonial perceptions, practices, and imperial contexts in which colonial ventures were pursued, and look at select colonial encounters in parts of Southeast Asia, particularly the Dutch East Indies/Indonesia, to address some of the major issues in the study of colonialism, and to familiarize students with the political and analytic dilemmas that arise in studying and identifying "the colonial" in postcolonial politics and in anthropology, history, and cultural studies today. We will examine the historical processes by which the categories of "colonizer" and "colonized" have been created by looking at gender politics, racial thinking, and class vision, with attention given to changes in colonial historiography, the interface of colonial power and the production of colonial knowledge. Undergraduates have the option of doing one book review and two essays, or one book review and a final exam. Graduate students are required to do the book review and a research paper. All students do short weekly commentaries on the readings. Readings are available in a course pack and at Shaman Drum.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

      ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

      Ethnology-Topical Courses

      Section 002 — Language and Socialization. Meets with Linguistics 792.004, Psychology 457.002, and Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

      Instructor(s): Marilyn Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu), Barbra Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See Linguistics 492.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

      ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

      Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

      Credits: (1-3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

      Linguistic Anthropology

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See Linguistics 517.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

      Linguistic Anthropology

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 514 or graduate standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/542/001.nsf

      See Linguistics 542.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      ANTHRCUL 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

      Linguistic Anthropology

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology or biology. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/576/001.nsf

      This course is an intensive introduction to theoretical issues in linguistics of special relevance to anthropologists, most of whose primary interests are outside of language. Think of language as a special kind of semiotic or cultural system. Our subject matter, then, consists of ways of approaching its formal description and the general issues (for the most part, about the nature of culture) that are raised by those approaches. Several such issues will continually crop up:

      1. The nature of cultural patterning and the means we use to describe it;
        is it possible to understand cultural patterning from the outside?
        How does our point of view change in the course of analysis?
      2. The possibility of cross-cultural comparison and typology using culturally-meaningful (or "emic") patterns as a basis;
        can general "laws of structure" of cultural form be constructed from descriptions of particular cultural systems?
      3. Are there true universals of culture?
        If universals do exist, what is their basis?
        Are they biologically determined, determined by the nature of the cultural code, or some combination of the two?
        What evidence is required to make sense of the question?
      4. What does it mean for individuals to share a culture?
        Does "sharing a culture" require collective representations?
        Are there any?

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


      Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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