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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies


This page was created at 7:36 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



ASIAN 154 / HISTORY 144. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Em

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/154/001.nsf

This course in an introduction to the study of Korean civilization. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will begin in pre-historic times and end in 1945. But our main focus will be social and cultural transformations during Koryo and Choson periods (936-1910). No knowledge of Korean is required. Requirements and class format consist of lectures and discussion, student presentations, two short papers, quizzes, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 204(121) / HISTORY 204. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 204.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 206(111) / HISTORY 206. Indian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 206.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 207(112) / HISTORY 207. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/207/001.nsf

See History 207.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 224. Traditions of Poetry in India.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/ssea250.html

Throughout readings and discussion this course introduces the student to six traditions of poetry in India:

  1. Vedic-Upanishadic mystic poetry
  2. Tamil Sangam love poetry
  3. Classical Sanskrit and Prakrit court poetry
  4. Medieval devotional poetry
  5. Urdu metaphysical poetry
  6. Modern secular poetry.

We will read translations of selections from each of these six traditions, appraise them as sources of aesthetic enjoyment from our own points of view, and, where possible, evaluate them in the context of their own place and time. In coming to terms with traditions far removed in space and time, the student will come to know something of Indian aesthetic theories and the continually renegotiated role of the poet in forming and transforming the ways in which people interpret their own life experience. The course will include an hour exam and five out of seven short (3-4 pp) papers, at least one of which will be a close reading and explication of an individual poem, and at least one other will compare notions of what makes poetry poetry in India and the West. Translation and/or transcreation is an option for one of these assignments. Additionally each student will be responsible for setting out the biographical and historical context of a listed poet in a class presentation. The list includes Baba Farid, Basavanna, Bihari, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Ghalib, Iqbal, Kabir, Kalidasa, Mir, Mira Bai, Nammalavar, Tagore, and Tukaram. Other names may be added depending on the specific interests of students. I will attempt to create an environment that encourages the free and active participation of everyone in the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 225 / RELIGION 225. Hinduism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madhav Deshpande (mmdesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This course will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of "modernity." We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 230 / PHIL 230 / RELIGION 230. Introduction to Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/230/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the study of Buddhism as a religious tradition. The course is arranged both thematically and historically, but does not pretend to cover the full range of Buddhist beliefs and practices. Among the themes linked to historical questions are: the Buddha in legend and history; Buddhist monks, nuns, and monasteries; lay practices; contemporary Buddhism, and Buddhism in the history of Southeast Asia and Japan. Themes discussed cross-culturally and across historical periods include: meditation, rituals and festivals, philosophy, and Buddhist images and ritual objects. The latter themes will include topics in Chinese and Tibetan Buddhism as well. Readings consist of five short books and a course pack that includes selected chapters from a textbook and primary texts in translation.

The course combines lectures (3/wk) with discussion (once/wk). Student evaluation will be based on participation in discussion sections (attendance required), five unannounced quizzes, two short (3 page) papers, and a comprehensive final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 001 — Haiku as Poetry & Philosophy.

Instructor(s): E Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee may be required.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will examine the world's briefest known poem, the haiku. How does this 17-syllable, 3-line poem signify? What assumptions about the nature of language and meaning lie behind its composition and interpretation? What social milieu produced it? What is its link to Zen practice and other Zen arts? Readings will be from the poetry and critical commentaries of the master Bashô and his disciples, with later poets such as Buson and Issa, as well as haiga (haiku paintings), providing opportunities for comparative study. The Western understanding of haiku in the Imagist movement, Ezra Pound, the beat generation, and Barthe's Empire of Signs will also be examined. Secondary sources are available in English, but given the brevity of the poems, analysis of some Japanese texts and their various English renditions will often be possible. Requirements: 4 short papers, a 36-verse haikai linked sequence by the class, and individual English haiku compositions through the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 002 — Food, Identity and Community in Japanese Culture.

Instructor(s): Ken K. Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee may be required.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the place of food in a community's understanding of itself and of others. Using modern Japanese fiction and film as our main texts, we will examine how the discourse of food defines regional and national identities, and how communities are represented through patterns of consumption or deprivation. We will probe the tension between the role of certain foods as markers of cultural authenticity and the reality of cuisine as a historically dynamic, hybrid enterprise. We will investigate the connections of gender and class to food and its preparation, and study how the sharing of food affects human alliances. In short, we will be asking what it means to eat sushi.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 254. Undergraduate Seminar in Korean Culture.

Section 001 — Buddhist Nuns in Korea.

Instructor(s): Eunsu Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Korean language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 263 / PHIL 263. Introduction to Chinese Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eric Hutton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/phil/263/001.nsf

See Philosophy 263.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 300(400). Love and Death in Japanese Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using the central existential questions of love, death, and beauty as thematic foci, this course examines the premodern history of the human being in Japan with the aim of exploring a different past and an other site for the study of the humanities than the one in which technology and profit maximization have now led to the virtual demise of the human as a viable measure of civil life. In the course of reading literature, both canonical and popular, which portray the thematics of love and death, we will analyze key concepts in Japanese cultural history that address issues of good and evil, truth, and "the beautiful." Attention will be paid to questions of interpretation that arise in reading the works of a culture different from the West in its philosophies and religions; in the non-logocentrism of its linguistic usages and artistic expressions; its emphasis on form and ritual as a crucial component of the moral human being. We will also note the existence of various separate cultures — courtly, merchant, craftsman, samurai and priest, actor and geisha, each with its own hierarchy and code of ethics and aesthetics. Class materials will include, apart from the literary works, secondary sources from criticism, history, philosophy and religion, sociology, as well as visual media like painting and film.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 312. Traditional Korean Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eunsu Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Knowledge of Korean language is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of Korean thought in comparative context. Main topics include Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Sirhak (Practical Learning). Basic doctrines of each tradition (and the distinctive and yet interrelated development or each of these tradition) are examined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 320. Sikh History I (16th-18th Centuries).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to study Sikh religious beliefs, practices, and institutions. The emphasis will be on the teachings of the founder, Guru Nanak, and the major doctrinal developments under subsequent Gurus. Particular attention will be paid to the scripture, the Adi Granth, and other Sikh texts as means to understanding the evolution of the Sikh community. The course begins with the examination of the formation of early Sikh tradition in the socioreligious context of North India and ends with the analysis of the historical and social processes through which the Khalsa Panth was consolidated. An essay of 3,000 words will carry 30% of the course marks. There will be two tests: a midterm worth 20% and a final worth 30%. The remaining 20% of marks will be allotted to the presentation and participation in tutorial discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 361. The Pursuit of Happiness in the Chinese Tradition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/361/001.nsf

The thematic focus of this course is what the philosopher-psychologist William James observed a century ago:

"How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure."

Although the idea of the "pursuit of happiness" has a privileged place in American thinking, reflections on the happiness question can readily be found in many other cultures through the ages as well. In this course, we will study texts from Chinese civilization as their creative and thinking authors pondered this age-old question and the meaning of life. We will discuss such issues as the generally life-affirming world views of the Chinese; the debates on how to construct a perfect society; what constitutes a good life; the fulfillments of spiritual cultivation, love and marriage, having a family and friends, work and play, and public service and/or private artistic and scholarly pursuit; and attitudes towards fate, suffering, evil, war, and death. Texts selected will be works of literature in the broad sense of the word, including philosophical, historical, and religious texts as well as belles-lettres. The course covers mainly the period from early times to the 12th century, but several works from later eras will also be included. Sample readings are: texts in Confucianism, Taoism, Legalism, and Buddhism; the historical account of the First Emperor of Qin who created the Chinese empire in 221 BCE; the works of China's greatest recluse-poet Tao Qian (365 - 427); the song lyrics of the woman poet Li Qingzhao (1084 - ca. 1151); The Plum in the Golden Vase, an anonymous 16th-century novel that passionately depicts the dying of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) through the main characters' relentless indulgence in the four vices of "wine, lust, greed, and anger"; and Six Chapters of a Floating Life by Shen Fu (1763 - after 1809), a true story about an ordinary artistic couple who were ostensibly failures in life, but happy in their failures.

The format of the course consists of three lectures and one recitation session per week. A few brief reaction papers, three short papers (four or five pages each), and a final examination are required. A distinctive feature of the course is the inclusion, along with printed texts, of material from visual culture such as film, painting, and illustration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 001 — Partition: Stories of Violence and Identity in Twentieth-century South Asia.

Instructor(s): Christi Merrill (merrillc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1947, India achieved independence from British colonial rule, but freedom brought a devastating partition into two separate nations: India and Pakistan. 15 million fled across the newly-formed borders, and a million were killed. The violence and dislocation have shaped post-colonial identities in both nations, and continue to inform border disputes and communal conflicts a half-century later. This course brings together a literary scholar and a historian to discuss what it means for the survivors of partition and the succeeding generations to remember details of these traumatic experiences in fiction, film, and personal testimony, and how these memories continue to form ideas about history, nation, community, family, self. Students will be expected to write an informal one-page reading response for each class, to participate actively in discussion, and to take a midterm and a final open book examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 381. Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Miranda D Brown (mdbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/381/001.nsf

We will examine the ways in which Asia has been and continues to be represented as an academic subject. We will read works by leading scholars on Asia (South, Southeast, and East Asia) such as Benedict Anderson, Partha Chatterjee, Nancy Florida, Dorothy Ko, Lydia Liu, and Edward Said about the culture, literature, and history of the region. Some questions that we will address include: How have scholars represented the pre-modern history and traditions (such as foot binding and caste) of former colonial states? What narratives of modernization and nationalism revolution have they spun, and how do those narratives reflect legacies of colonial domination?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 395. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors candidate in Asian Studies and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of ASIAN 395, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ASIAN 428 / POLSCI 339 / SOC 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 339.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 002 — History of Hinduism.

Instructor(s): Donald R. Davis Jr. (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/455/002.nsf

How can Hinduism be both one of the oldest and one of the newest major religious traditions of the world? By examining the work of three periods in the history of Hindu Studies, we will trace the evolution of how we learn about Hinduism today and how our knowledge differs from early studies of the same religious tradition. The course will center on the differing sources available for studying Hinduism (ethnography, literature, epigraphy, colonial records, art, artifacts, etc.) and how these sources have been used or ignored by scholars, colonial officials, and politicians in India. Individualized library projects will play off the representative periods studied in class and will be designed to question the ways in which our knowledge of Hinduism is and has been organized and how that organization has affected both public and academic perceptions of Hinduism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 003 — Jainism: Non-violence, Riches, and Renunciation.

Instructor(s): Donald R. Davis Jr. (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/455/003.nsf

As one of the world's oldest religions, Jainism has often been described as an atheistic soteriology, or method of personal salvation. The intense religious, especially ascetic, discipline required of Jain monks and nuns is the most visible symbol of Jainism. The cardinal virtue in this ascetic regimen is ahimsa, or non-violence, which characterizes every action performed by Jain monks and nuns and is held as an ideal for Jain laypeople as well.

Given the emphasis on ascetic practice in Jainism, one may not expect many lay Jains to be wealthy merchants who own thriving trading businesses in some of India's largest cities. The contrast, and seeming contradiction, between ascetic ideals and prosperous lives within the theological, ritual, and social frameworks of Jainism will be the principal subject of this course. The early focus will be on Jain theology and philosophy, i.e., those concepts and world-views that Jain leaders have expounded and idealized since the founding of the tradition in the 5th century BC. The second part of the course will shift attention away from the conceptual and theological to the practical and ritual aspects of Jain life in India.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 457. Modernism and Modernity in East Asian Fiction.

Section 001 — Meets with RCCORE 334.001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Zwicker (jzwicker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/457/001.nsf

This course is designed as a 400 level seminar for advanced undergraduates as a well as for MA candidates affiliated with the International Institute's Centers for Chinese and Studies. While the course will generally follow a chronological sequence, each meeting will focus on a particular thematic issue ranging from problems such as 'The Novel and Homelessness' at the beginning of the course through problems related to 'Colonialism and its Aftermaths' and 'Lost Identities' in contemporary Asian writing. The course will serve at once to introduce students to the major authors of the modern tradition — from Natsume Soseki, Lu Xun, and Kim Tong-in to Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, and Shen Congwen — as well as to more recent writings by contemporary authors and writers of the Asian diaspora like Eileen Chang and Chang-Rae Lee. The aim of this course is to have undergraduates think critically and also comparatively about issues that have shaped and continue to shape cultural production in China, Korea, and Japan and to think about both the specificities of the literatures of the region as well as shared and interconnected experiences of modernity which broadly connect the cultures of the region during the twentieth century.

Course Requirements In addition to class attendance and participation, students will be expected to complete two papers (5-7 pages) and a take home examination consisting of five short essay questions to be answered in one page each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 — Visualizing Social Life in Edo. Meeting 10 weeks beginning on 10/1,10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 12/3, 12/10. Meets with History 590.002. (Drop/Add deadline=October 14).

Instructor(s): Reinhard Zoellner

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See 590.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 001 — Institutions, Technologies and the Production of South Asian Expertise. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Mary Rader (mrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field of South Asian Studies is enormous and often unwieldy, encompassing multiple disciplines, geographical boundaries, institutional locations, historicities, languages, scripts. Because of this diversity, identifying, finding and evaluating sources can be both a daunting and difficult task. In this course, we will explore the organization and production of knowledge on South Asia, particularly as it pertains to students' specific research needs and concerns. The organization of knowledge will be explored through the use of tools such as bibliographies and indexes. The production of knowledge will be addressed via the examination of influential monographs, series and articles. By the end of the course, students will have gained significant skills to help them overcome the barriers of locating and organizing materials needed for their work as well as a confidence in referring to materials and research outside their own lines of inquiry.

The structure of the class is a basic seminar format organized around particular disciplines of South Asian Studies. Each week, we will analyze and discuss historic and current trends in the discipline as well as consult the relevant bibliographic research tools. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final bibliographical project. Examples of final projects are extensive subject bibliographies, shorter annotated bibliographies and descriptive essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 002 — Terrorism, Islam & the News Media. Meets with COMM 439.006 and 439.005.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/005.nsf

See Communication Studies 439.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 003 — New Islam in Indonesia. [Credit?]

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department required.


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