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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Civilization


This page was created at 7:26 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CLCIV 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CLCIV 101 is offered in the Fall and CLCIV 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies — literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (CLARCH 221 — offered in the Fall) and Rome (CLARCH 222 — offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (CLARCH 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


CLCIV 101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Forsdyke (forsdyke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/programs/class/cc/101/

Do you know the answers to these puzzling questions?

  • Why were the Homeric characters Achilles and Odysseus so important to Greek culture and identity?
  • How did the Greeks come to invent the first democracy?
  • Why did the Greeks, who valued freedom so greatly, condone slavery?
  • Why did the ancient comedian Aristophanes fantasize about the possibility of a women's rebellion in the form of a sex strike?
  • Why did the ancient Athenians put the famous philosopher Socrates to death?
  • How are we to explain the harsh and indeed bizarre penalties for adultery in ancient Athens?

If these sayings and questions make you curious, then consider signing up for CLCIV 101: The Ancient Greek World. This course serves as an introduction to the history and culture of this fascinating but paradoxical civilization. We will laugh with the ancient comedians and think with the ancient philosophers. We will also confront the contradictions of this complex society. There will be approximately 50 pages of reading per week, two short projects (for example, a presentation and a short paper), a midterm, and a final examination. No previous knowledge is required. Students who enroll in this course may choose to take the companion course, CLCIV 102: The Ancient Roman World (offered in the Winter Term). Students who complete the CLCIV 101-102 sequence are encouraged to consider a concentration in Classical Studies: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/undergrad/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 — Plato's Republic: Utopian Constructions in Political Philosophy.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clciv/120/001.nsf

This seminar will be devoted to reading Plato's Republic. The great themes of Plato's philosophy, including his ethics, aesthetics, and metaphysics, are sketched here in their most complete form. But more than what the Republic tells us about Plato's philosophy, we'll also glance at the reception of the Republic in the modern world. What influence did it have in fascist ideologies? Who were some of the important political figures who invoked Plato's Republic ? Perhaps no other book of the Greeks has been so polemical and provoked so many both to rage and to admiration.

Methods: In addition to reading the entire Republic with great care, the class will also feature book reports on modern interpretations of the Republic. Students will be responsible for five out of ten short position papers, two oral reports, and a written book review.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 215. Ovid.

Section 001 — Mini course beginning Oct. 21 (Drop/Add deadline=November 3).

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign LitMini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ovid has been among the most influential writers in the European literary tradition, and he is one of the most enjoyable authors in the canon. This mini-seminar will examine both the original contexts of his works and what he has meant for later readers, with emphasis on the love poetry and the "Metamorphoses." Themes will include his treatment of women and sexuality, his narrative technique and wit, his relationships with Augustus and with Roman power, his presentation of self, and whatever aspects the group finds most interesting. We will look at both recent adaptations, including Ted Hughes' "Tales from Ovid" and the collection "After Ovid," and Elizabethan translations, including Golding's "Metamorphoses" (which Shakespeare used) and Christopher Marlowe's "Amores." We will also look (briefly) at paintings based on Ovidian themes from the Renaissance to the present. There will be two short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 365 / CLARCH 365. Alexander the Great: The Making of a Legend.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clarch/365/001.nsf

Alexander's world-conquering exploits and early death in 323 B.C. made him a legend not only in his own time, but for posterity. This course employs historical, literary, archaeological, artistic, and other forms of evidence to focus critically on the 'reality' and 'image' of Alexander in antiquity. But its main emphasis and scope extend far beyond Alexander's own world, to examine his legacy and how knowledge about him has been transmitted and distorted, used and abused: what the Romans made of him, the Medieval Alexander tradition, even his relevance in contemporary politics and his current attraction for Hollywood movie-makers. There are illustrated lectures, supplemented by the occasional use of excerpts from documentary films and movies. Students will read about Alexander in selections from two ancient lives, a medieval romance-legend, modern scholarly studies, and a novel about Alexander. Grades will be assigned on the basis of quizzes and a midterm exam, a final exam, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 372. Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David S Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clciv/372/001.nsf

The amphitheater full of gladiators, the circus full of chariots (with or without Charleton Heston) are among the most abiding images of Roman, and perhaps, any western culture. The Olympic games were as much a Roman institution as they were Greek — indeed the Roman empire was the first great age of public entertainment. But what did it all mean? How is entertainment related to the interests of society as a whole? These are two of the questions that we will explore through a discussion of the place of Roman entertainment in Roman society. We will start by looking at the broad structures of Roman life, and then move through the diverse entertainments of the Romans from athletic events to the theater, from chariot racing to public execution, beast hunts, and gladiators. Readings include selections from ancient authors and from recent scholarship.

Textbooks are available at Shaman Drum, the course packs (one of sources, one of modern readings) from Accu-Copy. The final grade will be the two hour exams, quizzes in section, homework assignments, and section participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 388 / PHIL 388. History of Philosophy: Ancient.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One Philosophy Introduction. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rkamteka/Philosophy388.html

See Philosophy 388.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

CLCIV 476 / HISTORY 405 / RELIGION 476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clciv/476/001.nsf

This course will survey the rise of Christianity to the position of the dominant religion in the Roman Empire between the late first century and the end of the fifth century. Emphasis will be placed on the changing place of the Christian Church in the classical world, persecution and conversion, and the different responses to Christian doctrine among various social classes. We will also consider the formation of a scriptural canon, the variety of competing heresies, and the establishment of orthodoxy. Finally, we will consider pagan-Christian intellectual roots and look closely at the pagan philosophical traditions that remained viable until the fifth century. We will consider not only Christian texts such as the Apostolic fathers, Clement, Origen, and Eusebius, but also pagan writers such as Plotinus, Porphyry, and others. This is a lecture course, with a midterm, final exam, and a ten page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 483 / ACABS 421 / RELIGION 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 421.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of CLCIV 499, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.


Graduate Course Listings for CLCIV.


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This page was created at 7:26 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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