Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Communication Studies


This page was created at 7:19 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



COMM 101. The Mass Media.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan J Douglas (sdoug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First- and second-year students only; others with permission of instructor. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/101/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide an introductory overview of contemporary mass media systems and an examination of the various factors — historical, economic, political, and cultural — that have shaped their development. The course begins with a description of present print and electronic media and examines their evolution. Attention is given throughout to the legal and ethical implications of mass communication systems and to comparisons between American media systems and those elsewhere in the world. Finally, it considers the probable future course of the media and examines possible alternatives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of department required.

COMM 102. Media Processes and Effects.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brad Bushman (bbushman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First- and second-year students only; others with permission of instructor. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/102/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the contemporary research on mass communication processes and effects. Basic processes involved in the production, dissemination, reception, and impact of media messages are examined. The course investigates a variety of effects on individuals' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as influences on the functioning of larger social systems. It proceeds in general from investigations of individual-level to societal-level impact. Critical reading and evaluation of research on media processes and effects, and of its application to social policy debates, is encouraged and developed.

Text: Harris, R.J. (1999). A Cognitive Psychology of Mass Communication Third Edition. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah: NJ. Available from the Michigan Union Bookstore, Michigan Book and Supply, and Ulrich's Bookstore. Also on reserve on the second floor of the Shapiro Undergraduate Library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 111. Workshop on Managing the Information Environment.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: First- and second-year students only; others with permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/111/001.nsf

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, online search and retrieval, web authoring, data management, image manipulation, the critical evaluation of information resources, and the formal presentation of research findings. The course introduces students to a range of campus information resources, including the university computing environment, the university library system, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Group-oriented assignments are designed to teach strategies needed to discover, evaluate, and communicate research findings within a university environment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 211. Evaluating Information.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael W Traugott (mtrau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-. Prerequisites enforced at registration. Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/211/001.nsf

This course teaches the fundamental thinking skills necessary for critical evaluation of research-based arguments, especially those based on quantitative information. Such skills are required for one to be a competent mass communicator of information, a critical consumer of information relayed by the mass media, or an intelligent scholar of media processes and effects.

The course introduces generic logical and statistical concepts through analysis and discussion of specific cases drawn from research reported in the mass media (e.g., health and business news, public opinion polls), research on the media, (e.g., the impact of media violence), and research for the media (e.g., audience research). Students' logical and quantitative reasoning skills are improved through a variety of "hands-on" exercises and projects (many involving computerized spreadsheet programs). The course is introductory in nature, and no prior statistical expertise is required.

Two textbooks have been ordered for the course:

  • Katzer, J, Cook, K. H., & Crouch, W. (1997). Evaluating Information: A Guide for Users of Social Science Research, 4th edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Lavrakas, P. and M. W. Traugott. (1999). The Voter's Guide to Election Polls, 2nd edition. Chatham NJ: Chatham House.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 321. Undergraduate Internship.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, concentration in communication studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Communication Studies concentrators who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Student assessment will be based on the academic merit of the work and evaluation of the final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 351. Structure and Function of Media Systems.

Section 002 ONLY satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~zyan/com351.html

This course examines research and scholarship focused on existing media institutions, their genesis and current lines of development, institutional arrangements, organization and operation, economic structure, and characteristic communications "output." Course topics may include: the history of media systems; media and government, including legal, regulatory, and free-expression issues; media economics; international media systems; technologies; media organizational routines; and the values and behavior of media professionals. The course investigates the ways in which institutional, economic, and organizational arrangements affect professional behavior and media content, with attention to media system changes over time and in comparative contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 361. Processes of Mediated Communication.

Section 002 ONLY satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/361/001.nsf

This course examines general phenomena involved with the creation, dissemination, and reception of mediated information. Course topics may include: information processing, including message encoding and decoding; media priming and framing of evaluations and decisions; influences of message structure and communication modalities on processing; media use and reception, including interpretive processes; information flow and control, focusing on influences of communication networks, message diffusion, and information gatekeeping; and communicative processes of learning, persuasion, and social influence. The emphasis is on the development and testing of general theories explaining how mediated communication works, even though research examined will center on particular cases (e.g., studies of priming in political communication).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 371. Media, Culture, and Society.

Section 002 ONLY satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dvail/371.html

This course explores the rise of the mass media and social and cultural issues surrounding the history of the mass media in the U.S. Course topics studied may include: communication and social identity, including race, ethnicity, and gender; media's role in defining and representing culture; issues of pluralism and post-colonialism, media audiences as interpretive and "imagined" communities; media and social movements; and the role of media in altering and maintaining political and social order. Research on mass communication is examined in connection with broader questions about the relations between cultural systems and social formations, and about the dynamics of social and cultural change and contestation.

Required Texts: (available for purchase at Shaman Drum. The texts are also available on reserve):

  • Douglas, Susan, Where the Girls Are
  • Frank, Thomas, The Conquest of Cool
  • Kasson, John F., Amusing the Million
  • Roeder, George, The Censored War
  • Rosen, Jeffrey, The Unwanted Gaze

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 381. Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior.

Section 002 ONLY satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Nancy Jennings (najenn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/381/001.nsf

This course critically evaluates research and scholarship on the impact of mass communication, especially television, in a variety of substantive domains. Media impact is treated both in theoretical and applied terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: social values; educational development; political behavior; violence and aggressive behavior; consumer behavior; health, emotion, and mood; and children. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 001 — Supreme Court News Coverage. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets withCOMM 439.002.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 439.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 002 — Supreme Court News Coverage. Meets with COMM 439.001.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 003 — Media & Ethno-Religious Conflict. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with Comm 439.004.

Instructor(s): Javed Nazir (jnazir@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 439.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 004 — Media & Ethno-Religious Conflict. Meets with Comm 439.003.

Instructor(s): Javed Nazir (jnazir@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on challenges related to media coverage in societies beset with ethnic and religious conflicts. The focus will primarily be on countries like Afghanistan and Pakistan. These two countries have witnessed a phenomenal upsurge in ethnic and religious violence, impinging on communication and information flow. Journalists seek objectivity and truth, confronting an extremely hostile environment often at considerable risk to their lives. Alongside, the course studies identical problems elsewhere in the world with a focus on Middle East and former ethnicity-convulsed Yugoslavia. How well journalists, both international and local, cope with these challenges is another key dimension of the course. Since linguistic, religious, and cultural diversity impact on the contents of mass communication, the course provides some insight into the structure and operation of the media in these countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 005 — Terrorism, Islam & the News Media. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 439.006 and Asian Studies 492.002.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/005.nsf

See Communication Studies 439.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 006 — Terrorism, Islam & the News Media. Meets with COMM 439.005 and Asian Studies 492.002.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/005.nsf

"You're either with us or against us," President Bush declared when he launched the war on terror. That line in the sand has been reflected in a war of words between the West and much of the Islamic world. To what extent have reporters and commentators been drawn into the confrontation? What unique pressures are at work on those covering this sensitive and dangerous story? How have governments and terror leaders used the media? How has coverage differed in various parts of the world? What has been the impact of the rise of satellite television in the Arab world? How effectively have reporters and editors prepared themselves? What are the ethical and practical issues involved in covering a story where a reporter's decision can cost lives — including his/her own? These and other questions will be explored through discussions, readings and an examination of recent reporting from around the world. The course will begin by providing students with a baseline understanding of Islam, U.S. Middle East policy and the psychology of terrorism, which will provide the foundation for a critical analysis of the broader issues to be tackled.

Texts will include the professor's new book, Seeds of Hate: How America's Lebanon Policy Ignited the Jihad.

Bio:

Lawrence Pintak is a veteran of 25 years in journalism on four continents. He has reported for many of the world's leading news organizations, spent five years as CBS News Middle East correspondent, served as a newspaper editor and editorial director of a major business news Internet site, and has advised various governments and multinational firms on international communications strategies. Pintak received two Emmy nominations and two Overseas Press Club citations for his coverage of the conflicts in Iraq and Lebanon. He reported on the birth of modern Islamic terrorism in Beirut and more recently reported on the rise of political Islam in Southeast Asia. He is the author of a book on U.S. Middle East policy and the roots of terrorism, an updated edition of which will be published in Sept. 2003 as Seeds of Hate: How America's Failed Lebanon Policy Ignited the Jihad.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 007 — Advocacy Journalism in the Face of War. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 439.008.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/007.nsf

See Communication Studies 439.008.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 008 — Advocacy Journalism in the Face of War. Meets with COMM 439.007.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/007.nsf

Some of the greatest examples of reporting emerge from conflict and suffering. Often, the words and images that move nations are the product of the journalist's own anger, pain or despair. This course will examine the impact when reporters take sides — on society, on the coverage and on the reporters themselves. We will explore how journalists use words and pictures to effect change and examine the question of where is the line between reportage, analysis and opinion. Examples will range from Hemingway in Spain to Cronkite in Vietnam to reporters in Iraq today and include some of the great war reporting in newspapers, television, photo-journalism and non-fiction literature.

Bio:

Lawrence Pintak is a veteran of 25 years in journalism on four continents. He has reported for many of the world's leading news organizations, spent five years as CBS News Middle East correspondent, served as a newspaper editor and editorial director of a major business news Internet site, and has advised various governments and multinational firms on international communications strategies. Pintak received two Emmy nominations and two Overseas Press Club citations for his coverage of the conflicts in Iraq and Lebanon. He reported on the birth of modern Islamic terrorism in Beirut and more recently reported on the rise of political Islam in Southeast Asia. He is the author of a book on U.S. Middle East policy and the roots of terrorism, an updated edition of which will be published in Sept. 2003 as Seeds of Hate: How America's Failed Lebanon Policy Ignited the Jihad.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of three credits of COMM 441 and 442 may be included in a communications studies concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of three credits of COMM 441 and 442 may be included in a communications studies concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for original, individualized student research under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with the faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

COMM 454. Media Economics.

Section 001 — Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with 454.002.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/454/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 454.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 454. Media Economics.

Section 002 — Meets with COMM 454.001.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to a range of economic principles and concepts used in explaining the market structure, behavior, and performance of mass media industries.

The course is organized around a selective list of media industries — newspaper, film and home video, broadcast television, cable television, and the Internet. Within each industry, we study relevant economic models and examine how consumer demand, technology, and government policies interact to affect market structure and industry behavior. Finally, we will discuss the economic, technological, and political forces changing the industry.

After completing this course, students will become acquainted with the various economic models applicable to the media industries. In addition, students will be able to apply basic economic concepts and analytical tools to explain media industry behaviors, evaluate business strategies of media firms, and assess the merits of public policies toward the media industries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 001 — Ethics Issues in Journalism. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 Credits]. Meets with COMM 458.002.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 458.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 002 — Ethics Issues in Journalism. [3 Credits]. Meets with COMM 458.001.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on problems in journalistic ethics at a time of growing concern over standards of news coverage, as exemplified most recently in the Lewinsky case. The course provides an historic overview of traditional journalistic ethics. Coupled with that is a detailed study of changing values in news coverage as media decision makers adapt to social, economic and technological changes. The course highlights such problems as sensationalism, infotainment, anonymous sources, hidden cameras, punditry, the lowering of the wall of separation between the business and editorial sides of news organizations, invasions of privacy, and the personal behavior of journalists. The course studies journalists' responsibilities to their profession and to the public, and examines proposed solutions to the problems of ethics violations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 003 — Black Media I. [3 Credits]. Meets with CAAS 486.

Instructor(s): Catherine Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course gives students in-depth knowledge of the history of the African American press from the antebellum era to the present. Through readings, discussions, and short papers, students will investigate relationships between the Black press, Black political ideas and social movements, and mainstream news coverage of African Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 004 — Information Policy. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 Credits]. Meets with 458.005.

Instructor(s): Brian Kahin (kahin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/458/004.nsf

See Communication Studies 458.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 005 — Information Policy. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 458.004.

Instructor(s): Brian Kahin (kahin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/458/004.nsf

This course examines policy challenges posed by the Information Revolution, especially the growth of the global Internet and the digital economy. It will consider how values associated with information reflect changing technologies, market conditions, and social context. It also examines the roles played by stakeholders and institutions in policy development processes. Designed to complement Communication Studies 454, the course emphasizes tensions and changes in intellectual property, competition policy, and electronic commerce.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 459. Seminar in Media Systems.

Section 001 — Foreign News Coverage. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 459.002.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 459.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 459. Seminar in Media Systems.

Section 002 — Foreign News Coverage. Meets with COMM 459.001.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates coverage of foreign news as a reflection of the structure and function of media systems. What factors influence media decisions on covering events overseas? What criteria do the media use for deciding which events to report and at what length, and how valid are these criteria? What value systems do they reflect? How successfully do the media make foreign news relevant to American readers, listeners, and viewers? What special problems do foreign correspondents face?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 001 — Persuasion Theory. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 Credits]. Meets with COMM 468.002.

Instructor(s): Bill Jennings (wpjennin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/468/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 468.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 002 — Persuasion Theory. [3 Credits]. Meets with Communication 468.001.

Instructor(s): Bill Jennings (wpjennin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/468/001.nsf

This course examines the theory and practice of human influence. Although it is not a class that deliberately seeks to teach you a specific set of skills, you will undoubtedly become more aware of how persuasion operates and what makes it effective or ineffective. This course orients you as a user and consumer of persuasion. In this sense, it promotes the notion of "persuasive awareness" because (1) there is a great amount of persuasion all around us that is rarely noticed and (2) there are procedures you can take to make good choices when others solicit you. During class, we will look at a variety of persuasive messages. We will examine public persuasion — the kind you see on television, and on the radio, but we will also consider how persuasion operates powerfully in our private lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 003 — Designing Persuasive Communication. Senior Communication Studies Concentrators Only. [Credits?] [3 credits]. Meets with Art 407 & Mktg 407.

Instructor(s): Douglas H Hesseltine

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Part of a sponsored project on persuasive communication, this interdisciplinary seminar investigates the changes in business, technology, and design that are reshaping the words and images, the form and content of persuasive mass communication. Its aim is to provide students with skills critical to an understanding of both the business and techniques of persuasion. This seminar examines how media content producers design and pitch messages. It challenges participants to use critical methods to evaluate media products and to examine current cultural and economic transformations. It investigates emerging strategies for reaching global and regional audiences, discusses the impact of new technologies and media convergence, and examines the social and ethical issues that underlie persuasive strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 004 — Mass Media & Psychological Processes. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 468.005.

Instructor(s): Silvia Knobloch (sknobloc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/468/004.nsf

See Communication Studies 468.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 005 — Mass Media & Psychological Processes. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 468.004.

Instructor(s): Silvia Knobloch (sknobloc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/468/004.nsf

The audience is the component of the mass communication system that is less visible than the messages itself or the communicators. Nonetheless, mass communication would be obsolete without the audience. This course discusses basic approaches to audience research. Media-psychological theories are, then, examined in greater detail. Besides broader audience research paradigms, such as the uses-and-gratifications approach, more refined models on information and entertainment use will be explored. Moreover, social effects and social constellations of media use will be investigated in media-psychological terms. More concrete questions addressed in this course are, for example, 'Why do we watch suspense movies?' and 'Do lovelorn people listen to more sad love music?' General skills trained in this course are presentation techniques, as well as arguing and writing on complex issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 471. Gender Issues in the Media.

Section 001 — Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 471.002.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Battles (kbattles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/471/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 471.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 471. Gender Issues in the Media.

Section 002 — Meets with COMM 471.001.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Battles (kbattles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/471/001.nsf

This course examines a variety of important connections between gender and mass communication, including the role of the media in shaping notions of gender in society. The course explores the representation of women in the mass media, and critically analyzes the historical roles of women as media images, producers, and audiences. Feminist theories and their applications to the study of media are examined in detail. The male and female "image" in popular media is studied in its social and historical context along with broader explorations of the social construction of masculinity and femininity and their relationships to class, race, and status in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 478. Special Topics in Media and Culture.

Section 001 — Visual Communication. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 478.002.

Instructor(s): Bradley Taylor (bltaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/478/001.nsf

This course serves as a gateway to the compelling world of visual communication, i.e., how individuals respond to the image-based messages that permeate modern mass communications. An intensive introduction to various forms of visual documentation — e.g., works of fine art, material artifacts, pop culture items, photographs, film and video — is followed by study of how the mind processes visual stimuli and how people respond affectively to images. Students will thus emerge with a basic vocabulary for reading and discussing visual materials and an understanding of how and why people respond to them. The second half of the class concentrates on media uses of visual imagery, examining specific applications in the realm of corporate advertising, the use of images in news reporting, the political and social uses of images, and how images are used to portray issues relating to race, class, and gender.

Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to interact directly with primary source materials in local museums and archives, learn from outside experts who regularly work with image-based materials, and develop expertise in using current technologies to capture, manipulate, and publish images for class assignments. The course uses multiple teaching styles toward facilitating an understanding of this broad field and ensuring that students incorporate learning on both cognitive and affective levels.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 478. Special Topics in Media and Culture.

Section 002 — Visual Communication. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 478.001.

Instructor(s): Bradley Taylor (bltaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/478/001.nsf

This course serves as a gateway to the compelling world of visual communication, i.e., how individuals respond to the image-based messages that permeate modern mass communications. An intensive introduction to various forms of visual documentation — e.g., works of fine art, material artifacts, pop culture items, photographs, film and video — is followed by study of how the mind processes visual stimuli and how people respond affectively to images. Students will thus emerge with a basic vocabulary for reading and discussing visual materials and an understanding of how and why people respond to them. The second half of the class concentrates on media uses of visual imagery, examining specific applications in the realm of corporate advertising, the use of images in news reporting, the political and social uses of images, and how images are used to portray issues relating to race, class, and gender.

Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to interact directly with primary source materials in local museums and archives, learn from outside experts who regularly work with image-based materials, and develop expertise in using current technologies to capture, manipulate, and publish images for class assignments. The course uses multiple teaching styles toward facilitating an understanding of this broad field and ensuring that students incorporate learning on both cognitive and affective levels.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 478. Special Topics in Media and Culture.

Section 003 — Cultural History of Radio. Communication Studies concentrators only. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 478.004.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Battles (kbattles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/478/003.nsf

See Communication Studies 478.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 478. Special Topics in Media and Culture.

Section 004 — Cultural History of Radio. [3 credits]. Meets with COMM 478.003.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Battles (kbattles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/478/003.nsf

It is the goal of this course to develop a critical cultural perspective on the history of radio, examining radio programming and its connections to the broader culture. The course begins with an exploration of the beginnings of popular radio in the 1920s and ends with a discussion of its current state. Considerable time is spent considering radio's "golden age" during the 1930s and 40s when it was the dominant popular culture medium. Course readings focus on secondary, scholarly books and articles, but will occasionally include primary texts. In addition, students will be required to complete weekly reading responses, a short analysis essay, and a final research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 479. Seminar in Media and Culture.

Section 001 — Historicity and Theory. Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 479.002.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/479/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 479.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 479. Seminar in Media and Culture.

Section 002 — Historicity and Theory. Meets with COMM 479.001.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines the dynamic interplay of media and culture drawing extensively on historical methodology and allied social and cultural theory as analytic tools. We will explore theories of culture, power, and history as a basis for examining the rise and social and cultural consequences of the modern media from the late 19th century to the present. The course will include specific historical and ethnographic case studies of media, culture, and society in the United States and elsewhere with an emphasis on race, ethnicity, and gender. We will consider, for example, the implications of social and cultural diasporas, and the role of media in shaping transnational consumption communities, multiple publics, and imagined communities. Prerequisites: COMM 371 is strongly recommended or an equivalent background in American culture and history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 481. Media and Violence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): L Rowell Huesmann (huesmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/481/001.nsf

This course examines the theoretical and empirical connections between violence in society and portrayals of violence in the mass media. The course explores the reasons for the prevalence of violent themes in television, film, and other popular media, and investigates the psychological and social mechanisms through which media portrayals might influence attitudes and behavior. Because one cannot fully understand the relation between violence in the media and violence in society without first understanding the causes of aggressive and violent behavior, we will begin by examining the nature of aggressive and violent behavior and how it develops, and we will discuss the role of the media as socializing agents in general. Then we will delve into the research and theory on the link between media violence and aggression. Finally, we will discuss societal and psychological approaches to controlling violence and the effects of media violence as well as issues of media policy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 482. Children and the Media.

Section 001 — Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 482.002.

Instructor(s): Nancy A Jennings (najenn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/482/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 482.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 482. Children and the Media.

Section 002 — Meets with COMM 482.001.

Instructor(s): Nancy A Jennings (najenn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/482/001.nsf

This course is designed to examine the impact of media on children and their families. We will explore how children use different media, in what context and what effect different media messages and platforms have on children. We will also examine the creation, development, and growth of Sesame Street over the past 30 years.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 484 / POLSCI 325. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bill Jennings (wpjennin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/484/001.nsf

This course focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. The interaction between the press, politicians, and the public during political campaigns receives detailed attention. Topics include: how news is made; campaign strategies; political advertising effects; relations between Congress, the President, and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 488. Special Topics in Media Effects.

Section 001 — Princ of Strategic Comm & Res. [4 credits].

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 381 strongly recommended. (3-4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/488/001.nsf

This course will introduce core concepts in strategic communication, which have been developed in various persuasive communication settings, including advertising, pubic relations, political campaigns, and health communication. Furthermore, it is designed to help students understand key research methods and interpretation of research data utilized in these settings. Students will be exposed to various processes of strategic communication research throughout the semester, which includes participation in a survey project. In summary, the course provides students with a basic understanding of the following areas:

  • The strategic industry, including advertising and public relations.
  • The ethics, regulations, and controversies of strategic communication
  • The role of strategic communication in the marketing of products, ideas, and people.
  • Various components of strategic communication campaigns and survey research

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

COMM 491. Senior Honors Seminar, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Traugott (mtrau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 311 and admission to Honors. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits of COMM 491-492 may be included in a Communication concentration plan. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (COMM 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Graduate Course Listings for COMM.


Page


This page was created at 7:19 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Advising Technology (webmaster_saa@umich.edu), G255-E Angell Hall

Copyright © 2003 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.