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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 7:02 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this writing course, literary texts — fiction, drama, poetry, and essays or other varieties of literary non-fiction — will be read and serve as an introduction to analytic and interpretive thinking at the college level. Students will examine the literature for meanings, rhetorical strategies, and the textual development of ideas and use their own writing to explore the many concepts found in that literature. The course is NOT a course in literary analysis only (though some of the writing may take that form). It is primarily a composition course which uses literature to generate ideas for essays and encourages a wide variety of essay forms in response to that literature. Students give careful attention to their own and their classmates' drafts, working to increase their understanding of the organization, argument, audience, voice, and other aspects of academic or public writing. Part of the function of this course is to bring students beyond summary to interpretation, analysis, and exploration of the myriad ideas contained in a single literary text. Generally, students will draft and revise four to six essays, while participating in workshops, conferencing with the instructor, and working with their drafts through the revision and editing process. A variety of informal writings — responses, peer reviews, free-writings, exercises, and so forth — are generally required as well. In sum, students will write 20-30 pages of revised, polished (graded) prose, and other (often ungraded) writing at the instructor's discretion.

Educational Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas
  2. Organize essays of varied lengths — from one paragraph to seven pages
  3. Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas
  4. Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, and
  5. Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Additional course subtitles and instructors' names will be added as they become available.

SECTION 001.
SECTION 002. (Ava J Pawlak)
SECTION 003. (Sejal V Sutaria)
SECTION 004 -- Reading and Writing the City. (Amanda Louisa Watson)
SECTION 005. (Sejal V Sutaria)
SECTION 006. (Phillip E Crymble)
SECTION 007 -- Rereading, Rethinking, & Rewriting. (Lori Erricoseaman)
SECTION 008 -- Space and Place in African-American Literature. (C LaTissia Mitchell)
SECTION 009 -- Adaptations. (Marjorie Beth Rubright)
SECTION 010 -- Writing in the Community. (Jean Marie Borger)
SECTION 011 -- Writing in the Community. (Jean Marie Borger)
SECTION 012.
SECTION 013 -- The Hero Goes Away: Problematic Protagonists.
SECTION 014 -- Acts of Interpretation. (Daniel J Mrozowski)
SECTION 015 -- The Hero Goes Away: Problematic Protagonists.
SECTION 016 -- Genre's Uses and its Limits. (Aaron S McCollough)
SECTION 017 -- The Failure of Great Men. (Fritz Garner Swanson)
SECTION 018 -- Voices of Witness, Voices of Change. (Sarah A Wolfson)
SECTION 019 -- Narrativity and the Novel. (Rebecca A G Smith)
SECTION 020 -- The Black Arts Movement Across Genres. (Eben Y Wood)
SECTION 021 -- Rereading the American Family. (Sharon J Pomerantz)
SECTION 022 -- Rereading the American Family. (Sharon J Pomerantz)
SECTION 023 -- Writing & Literature: The Power of the Word. (Rachel Margarethe Peterson)
SECTION 024 -- Writing Voice. (Laura A Williamson)
SECTION 025 -- The 20th Century American Novel. (Monica Andrea Bachmann)
SECTION 026 -- Journeys Through Time and Consciousness. (Russell Craig McDonald)
SECTION 027 -- Writing, Moving, Reading. (Olivera Jokic)
SECTION 028 -- American Idle: Labor, Leisure, and Literary Analysis. (Shana M Kimball)
SECTION 029 -- Visions and Revisions. (Elspeth Egerton Healey)
SECTION 030 -- Bearing Witness: Dramas of Self and History. (Angela Joy Balla)
SECTION 031 -- Just Say the Words I Want to Hear: Language & Relationships. (Jennifer Ann Lutman)
SECTION 032. (Holly E Dugan)
SECTION 033. (LAUREN KINGSLEY)
SECTION 034 -- Empire & Migration. (Sheshalatha Reddy)
SECTION 035 -- Writing the Environment. (Lauren Elizabeth LaFauci)
SECTION 036 -- Angles of Vision. (Holly M Burmeister)
SECTION 037 -- 1950's Dime Fiction: Pocket Novels, Pulp Writing & the Psychology of Cold War Culture. (Phillip E Crymble)
SECTION 038 -- Voices of Witness, Voices of Change. (Sarah A Wolfson)
SECTION 039. (Ji-Hyae Park)
SECTION 040 -- Language, Identity, & Empowerment. (Emily Susan Lutenski)
SECTION 041.
SECTION 042.
SECTION 043.
SECTION 044.
SECTION 045.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 004 — Reading and Writing the City.

Instructor(s): Amanda L Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/124/004.nsf

In this introductory writing course, we'll approach the new world of college writing and the (for some of you) new environment of Ann Arbor through a series of readings focused on city life. The theme of "reading and writing the city" will allow us to explore a variety of different types of published writing, from short stories and poems about urban life to an experimental novel about imaginary cities to nonfictional works about how people understand their environments. It will also allow you to hone your analytical and persuasive skills on both the texts we read and the town around us. Expect to read in quite a few literary and nonliterary genres, to write on a regular basis, and to become skilled at editing your own and others' written work.

Course requirements: four papers; 1-page workshop critiques; various informal in-class writing assignments; regular attendance and participation in class activities; one oral presentation with handout; contribution to class-authored style and grammar handbook

Readings: The following will be available at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street: Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

A course pack of additional readings will be available at Accu-Copy (518 E. William St.). Unless otherwise indicated, readings on the syllabus will be from the course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 009 — Adaptations.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Rubright (mrubrigh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/124/009.nsf

"There are times in life when the question of knowing if one can think differently than one thinks and perceive differently than one sees is absolutely necessary if one is to go on looking and reflecting at all."

Foucault's Preface to La Volonte de Savoir

Through a close examination first of children's stories and then of film and stage adaptations of literary texts, this course offers each of you the opportunity to learn to think differently than you think today and to perceive texts differently than you perceive them upon your first encounter. This is no small undertaking. However, it can be one of the richest rewards of a university liberal arts education, which, for many of you, begins today. Throughout the term, you will be asked to articulate your discoveries about literature in writing and then rigorously revise your initial perceptions, thoughts, and discoveries. We will think about the ways in which the literary texts and adaptations that we read and view determine the story that can be told. As writers, we will consider how the structure and style of an argument shapes an essay's exploration. And, we will learn how to adapt our writing to the argument we want to advance or question we most want to probe.

On another level, the theme of 'adaptation' is meant to touch on your process of adapting to the standards of university-level reading and writing. Each assignment is designed to give you tools to take with you into your future coursework at Michigan. At the top of each assignment you will find a section entitled "Toolkit" where I state the skills that assignment aims to help you develop and practice.

It is my hope that together we will explore, challenge, and celebrate our intellectual investments in literature and our creative potential as writers. The only prerequisite for the course is your genuine interest in developing your ideas about literature through your writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 031 — Language & Relationships.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Lutman (jlutman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/124/031.nsf

The theme of this ENGLISH 124 section is "Language & Relationships." As the title suggests, we will explore the role of language in social relationships — with friends, 'special' friends, family, teachers, business colleagues, and others — but we will also consider our individual relationships to language itself.

What are your words? What do they mean to you? How do you use them? When do they fail you or cause you trouble? We will read stories, poems, novels, and essays with these broad questions in mind, and you will practice your analytic thinking and writing skills by responding, formally and informally, to assigned texts. For your formal papers, I will ask you to write in the style of traditional literary analysis, but we will discuss how this approach compares to writing in other academic subjects. You will learn strategies for interpreting academic course material and professors' assignments, learn to use composition as a tool for learning, and generally work toward making the heavy writing requirements of college not quite so scary, painful, or boring. You will also, I hope, enjoy the imaginative work of the writers we will read.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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