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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 7:27 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Writing is a supremely unnatural act, and that can be a great comfort. Since writing is an acquired skill, we can always change how we write, and we can always make new discoveries about our own potential as writers. This course will introduce you to your power to change as a writer. You will come to experience the joy of learning to use words as efficient tools, the pleasure of developing a style of expression that enhances your ideas, and the satisfaction of exploring your ideas through writing about them. By analyzing mostly non-fiction texts from a variety of academic disciplines, you will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. How and when might you use their conventions in your own writing? How, for example, would a description of a summer meadow change if you revised it to become part of a contemplative essay on your emotional responses to nature, a lab report, a comparison of Romantic and Postmodern attitudes toward nature, an analysis of Annie Dillard's nature writing, or a report on the ecological effects of drilling for oil? In this course, you will have the opportunity to learn the writing skills that will permit you to address such diverse tasks and to express yourself appropriately in the very complex system of social interactions that make up the University.

Basic Course Requirements: 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose, and other (often ungraded) writing at the instructor's discretion.

Educational Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas
  2. Organize essays of varied lengths - from one paragraph to seven pages
  3. Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas
  4. Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, and
  5. Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Additional course subtitles and instructors' names will be added as they become available.

SECTION 001. (Fetsum-Rahwa Ghirmai Haile)
SECTION 002.
SECTION 003. (Kristyn Kuennen)
SECTION 004.
SECTION 005. (Kristyn Kuennen)
SECTION 006. (Sarah Frantz)
SECTION 007 -- Structure, Style, & Sense. (Michelle Turner)
SECTION 008. (John P Bishop)
SECTION 009 -- Structure, Style, & Sense. (Michelle Turner)
SECTION 010. (Deidre Wheaton)
SECTION 011 -- Writing with Voice. (Sarah A Wolfson)
SECTION 012 -- Finding Your Scholarly Voice. (Michele Herrman Champagne)
SECTION 013. (SarahFrantz)
SECTION 014 -- Finding Your Scholarly Voice. (Michele Herrman Champagne)
SECTION 015. (John P Bishop)
SECTION 016.
SECTION 017. (Sean P Norton)
SECTION 017.
SECTION 018 -- Writing, Identities, Society. (Jeffrey Arellano Cabusao)
SECTION 019. (Peggy Lynn Adler)
SECTION 020. (Kelly D Williams)
SECTION 021. (LAURA KOPCHICK)
SECTION 022 -- Writing as Social Action.
SECTION 023. (Sean P Norton)
SECTION 024.
SECTION 025 -- Images of Ideology in the Representation of Reality. (Stanton McManus)
SECTION 026. (John N Cords)
SECTION 027 -- Mindful Living, Mindful Writing. (Liansu Meng)
SECTION 028 -- Myth Making. (Alethea Raybeck)
SECTION 029 -- Essentials of Argument: Rhetoric and the Art of Persuasion.
SECTION 030.
SECTION 031 -- The Cultures of Curiosity. (Rattawut Lapcharoensap)
SECTION 032 -- Crafting Identity and Argument.
SECTION 033 -- Language and Identity. (Marianne Lingg)
SECTION 034 -- Understanding Advertisements. (Tonya-Marie Locke Howe)
SECTION 035 -- Language and Identity.
SECTION 036 -- Basic Forms in College Writing. (HILARY THOMPSON)
SECTION 037. (Sarah Samantha Gaye Frantz)
SECTION 038 -- Relating Science and the Humanities. (Sayan Bhattacharyya)
SECTION 039 -- The Twilight Zone. (JOSIE KEARNS)
SECTION 040 -- Writing and Integrity. (Paul Barron)
SECTION 041.
SECTION 042 -- From Observation to Argument.
SECTION 043 -- Understanding Writing: Media and Literature. (Adeline Koh)
SECTION 044 -- Coming of Age. (Anna Smith)
SECTION 045 -- Coming of Age. (LAURA KOPCHICK)
SECTION 046. (Marika Ismail)
SECTION 047 -- A HREF="http://www.lsa.umich.edu/saa/publications/courseguide/fall/archive/fall03cg/361125.html?f03#anchor361125047">The Art of Fact: From Observation to Argument.
SECTION 048 -- A Course in Craft. (Laura Krughoff)
SECTION 049.
SECTION 050 -- Sex and Sexuality in American History, Film and Literature: Research and Writing. (Robert S Hill)
SECTION 051 -- Portrayal of Genius in Literature & Film. (Jaswinder Bolina)
SECTION 052 -- Myth Making. (Alethea Raybeck)
SECTION 053 -- Basic Forms in College Writing. (HILARY THOMPSON)
SECTION 054 -- Portrayal of Genius in Literature & Film. (Jaswinder Bolina)
SECTION 055 -- An Illustrated Guide to College Writing. (Kirk Davis)
SECTION 056 -- Home Less Home More: Quality of Life and Urban Development. (GEORGE COOPER)
SECTION 057 -- Writing for an Audience. (Amanda Watson)
SECTION 058 -- An Illustrated Guide to College Writing. (Kirk Davis)
SECTION 059 -- Adventures in College Writing. (Emily A Crandall)
SECTION 060 -- Restricted to CSP students. (RANDALL TESSIER)
SECTION 061 -- Restricted to CSP students. (RANDALL TESSIER)
SECTION 062 -- Restricted to CSP students. (ENID ZIMMERMAN)
SECTION 063 -- Restricted to CSP students. (ENID ZIMMERMAN)
SECTION 064 -- Restricted to CSP students. (GEOFFREY BANKOWSKI)
SECTION 065 -- Restricted to CSP students. (GEOFFREY BANKOWSKI)
SECTION 066 -- Power, Persuasion, & Paranoia. (Scott Gladney)
SECTION 067 -- Writing for an Audience. (Amanda Watson)
SECTION 068 -- This Dark Coast: Writing as Communication. (John Cox)
SECTION 069 -- Writing and Integrity. (Paul Barron)
SECTION 070 -- Portrayal of Genius in Literature & Film. (Jaswinder Bolina)
SECTION 071 -- Exploring the Writing Process.
SECTION 072. (Michelle Turner)
SECTION 073. (Marika Ismail)
SECTION 074 -- Terrorism and Police in American Culture. (Shawn Kimmel)
SECTION 075 -- Writing Truth to Power. (THERESE STANTON)
SECTION 076. (Margaret L Dean)
SECTION 077 -- Writing as a Way of Knowing.
SECTION 078.
SECTION 079. (Melanie Boyd)
SECTION 080.
SECTION 081.
SECTION 082.
SECTION 083.
SECTION 084 -- The Twilight Zone. (JOSIE KEARNS)
SECTION 085 -- A Course in Craft. (Laura Krughoff)
SECTION 086.
SECTION 087.
SECTION 088.
SECTION 089.
SECTION 090.
SECTION 091.
SECTION 092.
SECTION 093.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Sarah A Wolfson (swolfson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/011.nsf

The goal of this course will be to develop and understand the power of our individual voices as writers. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to how the individual voice, both written and spoken, can help impact the world around us. To accomplish this, we will read a wide range of essays and discuss them both in light of their style (to help us structure and polish our writing) and their content (to help us know what matters most to us). The latter is especially important since voice grows out of what is most compelling to you — to that end, you will always be able to pick your own paper topics. Writing assignments will include: 4-6 papers, frequent and substantial revision, and regular writing exercises both in and out of class. Student should expect to take risks with their writing, to work collaboratively, and to discuss both the readings and the work of their peers actively, honestly, and with open minds.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 012, 014 — Finding Your Scholarly Voice.

Instructor(s): Michele Herrman Champagne (mherrman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/012.nsf

Cast aside the idea that writing is simply a way to prove to your professors that you have been paying attention in lecture and doing the assigned reading! This course challenges you to think of your college writing as a way to insert your own ideas into public discourse — to participate in larger conversations among scholars. The four major writing assignments this term are designed to help you find your "scholarly voice" — encouraging you to write about topics in which you feel personally invested, so that your contribution is meaningful to you.

Our readings will provide you with rhetorical models for your own essays. Through implementing the techniques you see others use, you will learn how to use language to shape ideas and thoughts. Through the semester-long process of reading, discussing, drafting and revising — and revising again — you will learn how to refine your control of the written word, enabling you to present your ideas in a clear, sophisticated, and powerful way.

COURSE GOALS:

  • To create a safe environment for group discussion and personal introspection
  • To develop strategies for approaching various types of academic writing assignments, learning to distinguish between different modes of writing — descriptive, argumentative, analytical — and to employ these modes purposefully to meet specific rhetorical goals.
  • To develop collaborative skills in peer writing workshops.
  • To make the abstract idea that we're writing for an audience real, by publishing three collections of our writing.

READING MATTER

  • Course pack (Required, available at Accu-copy)
  • Eds., Elaine P. Maimon and Janice H. Peritz. A Writer's Resource (Required, will be available at Shaman Drum in a couple of weeks)

THE WRITING: This is a 4-credit writing course, and you should expect to do a lot of writing. Each and every week this academic term, you should be engaged in at least one stage of the writing process — formulating, writing, or revising an essay. The major writing assignments are:

  • Essay #1, a descriptive essay with an analytical conclusion (3-4 pages)
  • Essay #2, an expository essay (4-5 pages) in which you will argue for the need to redefine a well-known term of your choosing.
  • Essay #3, an expository essay (4-5 pages) in which you will analyze an unfamiliar setting or gathering from the position of an ethnographer.
  • Essay #4, an annotated bibliography (8 sources) which requires you to research an issue of your choosing, to distill the main arguments of your sources into short paragraph summaries, and then to write a short essay (2-3 pages) explaining how your research deepened your understanding of the issue.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 014 — Finding Your Scholarly Voice.

Instructor(s): Michele Herrman Champagne (mherrman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/014.nsf

See English 125.012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 017, 023.

Instructor(s): Sean P Norton (spnorton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/017.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Sean P Norton (spnorton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/023.nsf

See English 125.017.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Liansu Meng (lmeng@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/027.nsf

This college writing course will help you improve your analytical and critical skills. There will be lots of pictures and words in our class. The main emphasis, however, is on words. You may consider yourself a picture person, a number person, an action person, or anything but a word person. Since we have come here to write, we are word people at least for here and now. And we are going to help one another to become better word people in this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 034 — College Writing & the Languages of Advertising.

Instructor(s): Tonya-Marie Locke Howe (thowe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/034.nsf

It is no longer enough to simply read and write. Students must also become literate in the understanding of visual messages...to distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter, and important news from coverage.

Ernest Boyer

Norman Douglas once wrote, "You can tell the ideals of a nation by their advertisements." The average American encounters approximately 3,000 advertisements per day — on buses and t-shirts, on pens at the bank, on billboards, in magazines, on television, and even on human skin. Copywriters, admen, and marketers make highly purposeful choices about every aspect of the advertisements populating the horizon, from background color to camera angle to the ideals of the target audience. Increasingly, film and other media are also becoming key sites in the culture of advertising; films may not advertise in the strictest sense, but they do advertise ideology. And for the most part, we buy into it all. It is a premise of this course that we — as readers, as students, as citizens and as consumers — should be just as concerned about what and how these advertisements signify. In this course, the language of advertising will become the point of departure for our inquiry into the work of good writing. Advertisements — successful advertisements — are meant to persuade the consumer to not only buy, but also buy into the ethos represented; as writers, your goal is to present, clearly and persuasively, a position to your audience. The two, you will have noted, are not dissimilar. While I do not expect that this class will "teach you how to write" it should begin the process. Therefore, written work for this course will be intensive. By the end of the term, you should have a portfolio of 25 pages of polished, college-level prose. There are no books necessary for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 038 — Relating Science and the Humanities.

Instructor(s): Sayan Bhattacharyya (bhattach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the times we live in, science, technology and its effects will be an inescapable part of life even for those of you who pursue other careers. In the university setting, "science" and "the arts" are (unfortunately) often seen as two completely different "camps" or "cultures" which do not have much to say to each other. One purpose of this course is to question this idea. How can "science" and "humanities" be made to dialog with each other?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, reserved for HSSP students

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 044 — Coming of Age in 20th-Century America.

Instructor(s): Ann Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/044.nsf

Modern American culture frequently considers entering college to be a significant milestone on the road to full adulthood. Matriculation in a post-secondary institution, however, is just one of many markers of maturity available to American youth. How do we decide what it means to become an adult? What factors — race? gender? region? class? — shape an individual's passage out of childhood?

In this course, we will use the question of what it meant to "come of age" in various contexts in the 20th century United States to guide our thought, discussion and writing. We will focus on the techniques necessary to succeed as a college-level writer: developing an argument, clear organization, proper source usage, productive revision, and constructive self- and peer-evaluation. Students will practice and hone these skills in response to a wide variety of historical sources, fiction, nonfiction, and multimedia texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 047 — The Art of Fact: From Observation to Argument.

Instructor(s): Donovan Hohn (dhohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/047.nsf

Over the next three and a half months, we will attempt to familiarize ourselves with some of the most prevalent varieties and best examples of a form of non-fiction commonly known as "literary journalism." Simply put, literary journalists combine the investigative techniques of newspaper reporters with the analytical techniques of essayists and the storytelling techniques of novelists. They dramatize facts. In studying this form, our purposes will not be exclusively scholarly. We will also become apprentice practitioners of the craft, imitating as well as explicating the texts we read.

Rest assured, you do not need to harbor literary or journalistic ambitions in order to benefit from this apprenticeship. As with any section of ENGLISH 125, the general aim of this course is to teach you how to write well; the more specific aim, to teach you how to write for college. Although the criteria for good writing vary significantly from discipline to discipline, the observational, investigative, descriptive, and interpretive skills of the literary journalist will be useful to you whether your field of study is particle physics, Sub-Saharan languages, or Byzantine art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 056 — Home Less Home More: Quality of Life and Urban Development. This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Instructor(s): George H Cooper (geob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Taught in conjunction with the Michigan Community Scholars Program, this course challenges students to reflect on and articulate social tensions that constitute what we live in as a community. We have two community partners to help us in this work: COURSE, Community Organization for Urban Revitalization and Sustainable Environment; and HERO, Homeless Empowerment Relationship Organization. Guided by these community, non-profit organizations, we will direct our attention to issues of homelessness, low income living, suburban sprawl, food consumption and production, especially as they become themes for investigation and writing. Some of this writing will be designed to assist our community partners in their work, and in that way students have an opportunity to effect change in the community and to write for an audience beyond each other and the teacher. Students will write frequent short reaction papers to their reading and experiences in the community. Students will also write four longer, more formal essays that cover a range of styles, from personal narrative, to exposition, to academic argument. The marriage of these two, non-profit organizations with the principles and goals of a writing course is, like any marriage, greater than the sum of the parts. At least I hope it to be so. Like a human marriage, the synthesis of these different parts will need constant attention, patience, and creativity, recognizing that a successful integration might very well defy understanding and explanation. And yet, that is what we will attempt, to understand and explain. We will read. We will talk. We will explain. We will argue. We will listen. We will pursue success, success in writing, in reading, in understanding a culture that might seem intent on destroying itself, but that also retains the possibility of reconstruction, of re-visioning, of its own articulation. We will reconstruct, re-vision, we will articulate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 057, 067 — Writing for an Audience.

Instructor(s): Amanda L Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/057.nsf

Writing is most interesting, and most effective, when the writer has a clear idea of his or her audience and a strong reason to write. In this introductory writing class, you will learn the basics of college-level writing through a series of assignments that ask you to imagine your potential readers. You will write a total of around 20 pages of revised prose, plus numerous short in-class assignments and responses to your classmates' writing. In-class workshops will show you how to revise your own work and help others revise theirs. Our readings will include a variety of essays chosen to provide potential models for your own writing, which will culminate in a project investigating a potential set of readers outside of our class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 059.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/059.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 067 — Writing for an Audience.

Instructor(s): Amanda L Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/125/057.nsf

See English 125.057.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 076 — The American Adolescent.

Instructor(s): Margaret Lazarus Dean (mldean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will read and write about the American teenager as a physical phase, a psychological stage, and a cultural invention. Readings and films will span the fields of educational theory, public health, sociology, anthropology, media studies, political philosophy, developmental psychology, race, class, and gender, and that always-fascinating subject, the prom. Students will write nine essays of varying lengths, give one class presentation, and participate regularly in an online discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, reserved for HSSP students


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