Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Environment


This page was created at 6:52 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



ENVIRON 110(UC 110) / BIOLOGY 110 / GEOSCI 171 / GEOG 110 / NRE 110 / AOSS 171 / ENSCEN 171. Introduction to Global Change: Physical Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ben A Van Der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies the geography requirement for State of Michigan certification for social studies teachers.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange1/

Instructor(s):

Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Over the past century, through our ever-increasing population and mastery of technology, we have been changing the global environment at a pace unknown to natural history.

The University of Michigan Global Change Program offers an interdisciplinary, introductory course sequence which investigates the causes and potential impacts of these changes using a combination of traditional lecture-based and modern web-based teaching methodologies. The Fall Academic Term course deals with issues relating to the physical, chemical, and biological cycles contributing to Global Change. Students apply learned knowledge by using spreadsheet and systems modeling software to investigate the dynamics of natural systems.

The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. In fact, you will create your own web-based poster on a topic of your choosing. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of changes in the environment. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, global economics, society as a whole and the individual. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration, and is the first of a series of courses that can be taken as part of the Global Change Minor.

You will discuss...

  • Current and Projected Global Change

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet

  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes

  • A Web-based Poster on a Related Topic of Your Choice

Topics that are covered ......

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory

  • Birth and Death of Stars

  • Radiation Laws

  • Origin of the Elements

  • Planetary Energy Budget

Our Planet:

  • The Age of the Earth

  • Primitive Atmospheres

  • Natural Hazards

  • Plate Tectonics

  • Chemical & Biological Evolution

  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems

  • The Great Ice Ages

  • Atmospheric Circulation and Weather

  • Climate and Paleoclimate

  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming

  • Sea Level Change

  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life

  • Extinction and Radiation

  • The Five Kingdoms

  • Natural Selection

  • Respiration and Photosynthesis

  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels

  • Environmental Pollutants

  • Ozone Depletion

  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ENVIRON 139 / NRE 139. First-Year Seminar in the Environment.

Section 019 — Environment, Sustainability & Social Change. MEETS WITH UC 154.001.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand, at both the global and local levels, the emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will address the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community-based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Over the course of the academic term, seminar members will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and will utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be primarily individual, but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 201 / NRE 201. Ecological Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Diana (jimd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre301/

A course involving lectures and discussions on ecological principles and concepts underlying the management and use of natural resources, with consideration of socioeconomic factors and institutional roles. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to matters concerning the allocation of natural resources and the quality of our environment. Topics covered include biodiversity, endangered species, exploitation practices, tropical deforestation, agriculture, air and water pollution, energy production and use, waste disposal, and the role of politics and economics in environmental issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 210 / NRE 210. Introduction to Environmental Policy Making.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry George Rabe (brabe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduces social, political, and organizational processes that influence and shape environmental and natural resources policy. Topics include: the legislative processes; agency functioning and behavior; interest-group activity; interaction in the political arena; the role and influence of technical information, public opinion, historical antecedent, and prevailing social conditions and institutions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 263(ENVRNSTD 263) / RCNSCI 263 / UP 263. Energy and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marc W Melaina (melaina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, or any college course in mathematics or natural science. (4). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/up/263/001.nsf

See RC Natural Science 263.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 270 / ENVRNSTD 270 / NRE 270. Our Common Future: Ecology, Economics & Ethics of Sustainable Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ivette Perfecto (perfecto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/270/001.nsf

See RC Environmental Studies 270.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 280(ENVRNSTD 280) / GEOSCI 280. Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen E Kesler (skesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/geosci/280/001.nsf

See Geological Sciences 280.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENVIRON 300 / NRE 300. Special Problems and Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study covering different resource issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 001 — Environmental Problems in Central Europe. Meets October 6 to October 29 [no class Oct. 13]. [1 credit]. Meets with REES 410.001. (Drop/Add deadline=October 14).

Instructor(s): Jadwiga Gzyl

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of the course is to present some examples of environmental threats from Central Europe (Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia) as well as the environmental policies of these countries. The examples will be grouped resource-wise. This means that pollution problems will be divided into three (3) groups related to mining and processing of the following natural resources: hard coal, lignite, and heavy metals. Each of the environmental threat examples will contain: characteristics of contamination sources, contaminant distribution (environmental fate), legal regulations on the national level, characteristics of exposed populations, and spatial and demographic characteristics of the region.

On the base of these examples, environmental impact assessment as well as human health risk assessment procedures will be presented. Some recommendations and protective measures will be formulated on the base of presented reports as well as prevention and remediation programs (if existing).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 002 — Comparative Environmental Policy. [3 credits]. Meets with POLSCI 389.001.

Instructor(s): Walter Rosenbaum

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course concerns different national styles of environmental policymaking and the reasons for the difference. The course focuses upon the internal political forces shaping national and regional responses to environmental issues, the substantive policies that result, and the impact of global politics upon both political process and policy in different national settings.

Students taking this course should have at least an introductory college course in American government, comparative government international relations or closely related fields. Class discussion, reading, and lectures will be supplemented with films/videos and, if possible, with guest lecturers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 303. Topics in Environmental Natural Science.

Section 001 — Ecological Management of Vegetation. [4 Credits]. Meets with NRE 306.060/061

Instructor(s): David Ellsworth (ellswor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-5). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/306/060.nsf

Traditional management of vegetation, the science and art of growing and tending plants, has always relied on ecological principles. In this course, we will examine the underlying principles of plant growth and population and ecosystem dynamics, and understand their application to managing vegetation following ecosystem management principles. The aim is to equip students with an ability to understand management choices under the constraints of diverse stand and site conditions as well as multiple management and conservation objectives. We will discuss common principles employed in the management for traditional products and amenities, and conservation of environmental resources and biological diversity. The responsibility of a vegetation manager is to meet management objectives through stand manipulation by using appropriate methods selected from a wide range of available strategies, which will be discussed in lecture and field activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 304. Topics in Culture and Environment.

Section 001 — Environmental Journalism: Reporting about Science, Policy, and Public Health. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Emilia Askari, Julie Halpert

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/304/001.nsf

Objective: To introduce students to basic researching and writing skills needed to cover current and emerging environmental issues and to learn how to critique environmental journalism.

The course will feature:

  1. In-class discussion readings.
  2. A series of guest speakers including prize-winning journalists and leaders in science, business and environmental activism.
  3. Field trips, possibly including visits to the Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Sources Lab in Ann Arbor, and to the U of M's experimental nuclear reactor.
  4. Tools for reporting and writing about environmental issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 305 / NRE 305. Society & Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/305/001.nsf

This is an introductory, overview course in environmental sociology designed primarily for upper-level undergraduates. No formal course work in sociology or other social sciences or environmental sciences is required, but students will likely find it helpful to have a background in these areas. Topics discussed include: sociological theory and the environment; environmental values, beliefs, and behavior; the environmental movement and protests; environmental discrimination, equity, and justice; the role of organizations in both creating and managing environmental problems; population-environment dynamics; the social impacts of resource use and conservation practices; environmental issues in developing countries and internationally; economics, public policy, and the environment; the limits to growth debate; and possible society-environment futures.

Together we will investigate the interplay among society, human behavior, and the biophysical environment. We attempt to accomplish two related objectives: (1) a better understanding of how society functions and of how humans behave by looking at our interactions with nature, natural resources, and the larger biophysical environment; and (2) a better understanding of our present environmental situation and futures by investigating the forces that shape our society.

Weekly discussion of assigned material will be an integral part of the course. Discussion of current events will be encouraged. Assignments consist of take-home examinations and a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 312(NRE 480) / POLSCI 380 / NRE 312. Environmental Politics and Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry George Rabe (brabe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Environmental Politics and Policy is an advanced course offering on environmental politics and the environmental policymaking process. The course will draw heavily on theoretical perspectives from the discipline of political science in examining the processes of environmental policy formation and implementation. It will examine enduring impediments to successful policy but will also emphasize factors contributing to successful initiatives. In particular, it will examine the political viability of alternative approaches to environmental policy, including pollution prevention and regulatory integration across medium (air, land, and water) and jurisdictional (state and regional) boundaries. Case applications will be drawn from a wide range of environmental issues, including air and water pollution, hazardous and radioactive waste, pesticides, and greenhouse gases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 317 / NRE 317. Conservation of Biological Diversity.

Section 001 — Meets with NRE 517.001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Foufopoulos (jfoufop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/517/001.nsf

Overview of historic and present-day causes of species extinction, and of biological principles central to species conservation and sustainable management of ecosystems. Topics covered include: episodes of extinction and diversification over earth history; geographic distribution strategies; and sustainable use of ecosystems. Weekly discussions deal with material from lectures, assigned readings, and films; and performing computer and gaming simulations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 328. Wetlands: Ecosystems, Public Policy, and Societal Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian J Klatt

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory interdisciplinary course in ENVIRON; BIOLOGY 100 or 162; and ENVIRON 210. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through lectures, readings, fieldtrips, and laboratory exercises, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that operate to form wetland ecosystems, and the ecological processes inherent within those systems, will be examined using a multidisciplinary approach involving hydrology; soils; plant biology; and plant and animal community ecology. Students will be provided with a comprehensive understanding of current regulatory protection of wetlands (Federal, state and local agency authority, dredge and fill permits, wetland mitigation and mitigation banking, etc.) and how those regulations grew out of a changing societal perception of wetlands as waste-places and "dismal miasma" in need of "improvement" by humans, to recognition of the functions and values provided by this class of natural resource. Thus, students would also be instructed not only in a broad range of aspects of wetland ecology, but would also examine the interplay of science and societal values in the development of government regulations, as related to a central environmental issue.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 333 / NRE 333. Writing About Natural Resources and Environment.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: junior standing and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course taken in conjunction with regular SNRE courses by which the upper-level writing requirement is met.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENVIRON 335 / CAAS 322 / NRE 335. Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class, and Gender.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta E Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/335/001.nsf

See CAAS 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 337 / EEB 355 / NRE 337. Woody Plants I: Biology and Identification.

Section 001 — Meets with NR&E 437.

Instructor(s): Burton V Barnes (bvb@umich.edu), Melanie Elizabet Gunn

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre337

Ecology, biology, and identification of trees, shrubs, and vines are studied in weekly field trips. Woody plants are studied in their natural ecosystems — including upland (oak-hickory, beech-sugar maple, lake plain), wetland (swamp, bog), and floodplain forests. Non-native species and ornamental plants are taught in the Nichols Arboretum, Saginaw Forest, and Main Campus. Lecture topics include vegetative and reproductive morphology; woody plant biology, ecology, and diversity; variation and genetics; systematics of woody plants; ornamental plants; and forest ecosystems of eastern and western North America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 360 / NRE 360. Behavior and Environment.

Section 001 — Meets with NRE 560 and UP 560.

Instructor(s): Raymond K De Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/nre360/

This course deals with two central themes: First, environmental problems are people problems, requiring an understanding of how people think, what they care about, what motivated them, and the conditions under which they behave most reasonably and creatively. Second, human behavior makes the most sense when studied in the context of the environment both present and evolutionary. This course builds a model of human nature based upon research in the field of environmental psychology.

The course will explore such topics as environmental perception and knowledge; preferred environments and coping with the failure of preference; and mental attention fatigue and restoration. It then applies this model to such issues as common property resource management and the psychology of sustainability.

The course is cross-disciplinary both in emphasis and student population with the disciplines of: natural resource policy, planning, and management; environmental education and communication; conservation behavior and conservation psychology; landscape architecture and urban planning; and green and sustainable business typically represented.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 370 / NRE 370 / ARCH 423 / UP 423. Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Kenvin Norton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/up/423/001.nsf

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 377(ENVRNSTD 407). Literature and the Environment.

Section 001 — Literature of the American Wilderness. Meets with ENGLISH 317.003.

Instructor(s): John Knott Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 317.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 391 / RCIDIV 391. Sustainability and the Campus.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine E Badgley

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in environmental studies, global change, or related field (e.g., ENVIRON 201, 240, 270). (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/391/001.nsf

See RC Interdivisional 391.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 395. Tools for Environmental Problem Solving.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen W Salant (ssalant@umich.edu) , Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math 115 or 112. (4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/395/001.nsf

This novel interdisciplinary course on problem solving is a core course in the new LSA-SNRE Program in the Environment. It draws on techniques (e.g., game theory, evolutionary dynamics, linear and nonlinear programming, sequential decision theory) from several disciplines: biology, economics, operations research, and political science. Further, it bolsters some very basic skills in mathematics and Bayesian statistics. A major goal of the course is to help students to look beyond the details of a particular problem in order first to classify it and then to recognize its analytical structure. Is the particular problem under consideration an optimization problem or an equilibrium problem? If an optimization problem, what type of problem: unconstrained or constrained? If constrained, linear or nonlinear? and so forth. Often seemingly dissimilar problems arising in wildly different context (some biological, some not) turn out to be analytically identical. The course develops central ideas in two areas: (1) optimizing behavior of a single agent; and (2) equilibrium behavior of multiple agents. These problems arise repeatedly in many decisions. What is the best way to maximize productivity of some ecosystem, if: there are no constraints or other considerations? if other people have different agendas from yours? The course will teach analytical approaches that are simultaneously fruitful in both the social and "hard" sciences. Every point discussed will be illustrated with a matched pair of examples — one from the sciences and the other drawn from the social sciences. Every exercise will be done with multiple examples that reach across disciplines. Students will learn how to solve the problems by hand, and they will learn how simple spreadsheet programs (Excel) can facilitate their analyses. Throughout their lives and in their environmental work, students will encounter problems of optimization and equilibrium, in various disguises. We hope to help students learn to classify the problems and then to see through their guises, so that they can recognize and greet as familiar friends any new problems they encounter. Throughout the course, we will discuss other methods techniques, setting the context for students. Thus we hope that students will take away not only preparation for advanced courses, but a lifelong analytical approach to problem solving. Finally, we hope to help them develop their analytical techniques for solving the most-frequently encountered problems. Students completing the course will have excellent preparation for courses such as high-level economics, game theory, behavioral ecology, and some courses in sociology and psychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 398 / NRE 398. Natural Resources Internship Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty sponsor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 411 / NRE 411. Fluvial Ecosystems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael J Wiley (mjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 311 or an upper-level course in aquatic ecology or hydrology. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://rivers.snre.umich.edu/WWW411/

Introduces key concepts and theory pertinent to understanding and managing fluvial ecosystems (rivers and streams). Emphasis on rivers as large-scale physical and biological systems; properties and processes. Laboratory includes intensive comparative field study of distinctive types of Michigan rivers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 415 / NRE 415. Behavioral Ecology and Conservation Biology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of BIOLOGY, including BIOLOGY 152. ENVIRON 438 recommended. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/415/001.nsf

Environments shape the behavior and life histories of animals, and animals' behaviors and life histories affect how we can act successfully to conserve and manage wildlife species.

How can we use this knowledge? Because environments pose constraints, in any given environment, behaviors have "better" (more effective, less costly) and "worse" impacts on an organism's survival and reproduction. Understanding this complex problem requires that we generate testable hypotheses to understand the functional significance of the behaviors we see. We must consider hypotheses in at least six basic areas: the basics of selection, how the basics play out in different environments, how environments shape life history, life history strategies-mating effort, life history strategies-parental effort, and how life histories affect what conservation strategies will work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 416 / NRE 416. Field Skills in Wildlife Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 415. ENVIRON 438 or equivalent statistics is recommended.(2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/416/001.nsf

In this course, we use field observations and experiments in concert with NRE 415 lectures to examine the problem of how environmental factors influence the ways in which organisms live and behave (natural selection theory). We integrate observation and theory, always in the context of hypothesis testing.

In observing organisms, you will deal with two (2) major problems: (1) How can you decipher exactly what you are seeing, quantify it, and communicate it to others so that they can repeat and expand your observations; and (2) How can you determine the functional significance of each behavior, distinguishing between proximate and ultimate causes, and testing between alternate hypotheses in a rigorous way? In this course, we will be doing animal ethograms to help answer these questions as well as graphing and statistical analyses of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 422 / EEB 440 / NRE 422. Biology of Fishes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kevin Eldon Wehrly

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, biogeography, ecology, and reproduction. The systematic position of fish among vertebrates is discussed and exemplary assemblages examined. Special attention is given to the effect of the physical properties of water on form, function and mode of life of fishes. Discussions examine current papers in the primary literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 423 / EEB 441 / NRE 423. The Biology of Fishes Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Kevin Eldon Wehrly

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (1). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Optional laboratory course accompanying ENVIRON 422, providing an introduction to the field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examining the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of world fishes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 430 / EEB 489 / NRE 430. Soil Properties and Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Zak (drzak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 337 and 435 highly recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre430/

Soils as central components of terrestrial ecosystems. Major emphasis is placed on physical, chemical, and biological properties and their relationships to plant growth and ecosystem processes. Understanding is developed using a combination of lectures, field- and laboratory-based exercises, and individual research. The function of soils in forested ecosystems is the primary focus; however, examples are drawn from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems.

This course centers on the overlap of soil science, forest ecology, and ecosystem ecology. Our goal is to understand:

  1. how the interactions of landform, topography, climate, and biota over time lead to the patterns of soil development and the distribution of soil types that we observe within the landscape;
  2. how physical, chemical, and biological properties of forest soils affect water and nutrient availability to plants and, ultimately, ecosystem productivity; and
  3. how nutrients are cycled within forest ecosystems and how these processes are influenced by land management practices.

In the field portion of the course, we will sample and describe soils of four forest ecosystems and observe first-hand how differences in landform, topography, climate, and biota influence soil development. In the laboratory we will analyze our soil samples for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties. Using these data in conjunction with field data, each student will select two of the four ecosystems for detailed comparison in a term paper. Although we will focus our attention on local forest ecosystems of Michigan, skills learned in this course may be broadly applied within a variety of terrestrial ecosystem types in other geographic regions.

Prerequisites: Students are expected to have a background in chemistry and biology. In particular, a working knowledge of chemical equilibria, ionic solution chemistry, pH, and oxidation-reduction reactions is highly recommended. Students without such background should consult with the instructor before enrolling. Also useful (although not required) is familiarity with biochemistry, plant physiology, microbiology, geology, and local flora. You will find it very helpful if you have had, or are currently enrolled in, Woody Plants (ENVIRON 337). The lectures and laboratory exercises in Soil Properties and Processes have been designed to complement Forest Ecology (ENVIRON 435), and we highly recommend that you enroll in these courses concurrently!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 432 / NRE 432. Hydrology and Watershed Management.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Richards (pauljr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Principles and processes affecting hydrologic cycles of forested watersheds: precipitation, interception, infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and stream flow. Major emphasis on how hydrologic processes affect watershed management of forest and other terrestrial ecosystems, and how watershed management affects water yield and quality. Floods, soil erosion, and water pollution will be emphasized as special problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 435 / NRE 435. Forest Ecology.

Section 001 — THERE WILL BE FIELD TRIPS TO UM BIO STATION AND TO THE SMOKEY MTS.

Instructor(s): Burton V Barnes (bvb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 337. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Landscape ecosystems and forest species are emphasized in weekly field trips and lectures stressing the ecology of species and the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Landscape ecosystems are studied by integrating physiography, climate, soil, and vegetation. Major emphasis on physiography and site-species relationships, establishment ecology, and competitive and mutualistic relationships. Fire ecology and genetic ecology are also stressed. Special field trips to northern Michigan and the Great Smoky Mountains.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 438 / NRE 438. Natural Resources Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emily D Silverman

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 239; MATH 115. MATH 116 is strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/438/001.nsf

An introductory statistics course, focusing on basic hypothesis testing. Topics covered include goodness-of-fit tests, contingency tables, t-test (1-sample, 2-sample, and paired tests), nonparametric tests, 1-way ANOVA, multiple comparisons, and simple linear regression. Students are expected to attend three lectures and a two-hour computer lab each week. The computer lab uses SPSS software. We will concentrate on applications to the ecological and environmental sciences and emphasize the connection between scientific and statistical hypotheses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 460 / NRE 460. Fishery Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 438. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/460/001.nsf

Fisheries have operated for thousands of years, and supplied employment, food, or recreation for most of the world's population. The current state of the world's fisheries is in crisis, because most fish populations are fully or overexploited. In this course, you will study the history, management, population ecology, oceanography, habitat, economics, and restoration of fisheries. Case studies will include examples of fisheries from the Great Lakes and the world's oceans.

Homework and lab exercises will reinforce theory from lecture. Students will be asked to prepare a literature review of a fishery or fishery problem, and read a novel or history that deals with the subject. In lab, students will work in a group project to study a local fishery or fishery problem. Field trips include sampling local lakes and streams, visits to a fish hatchery, and an overnight trip to the Manistee River during the salmon run.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 471 / NRE 471. Analytical Tools for Environmental Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gloria E Helfand (ghelfand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Statistics (ENVIRON 438 or STATS 402); Economics (NRE 375, 570 or ECON 401). (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/471/001.nsf

An introduction to policy analysis and some of the tools useful for analyzing data, with emphasis on environmental and resource applications. The course will cover methods of policy analysis, modeling, and applications of linear regression and linear programming.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 475 / NRE 475 / EHS 588. Environmental Law.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sally Jo Churchill, Robert H Abrams

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduces students to environmental law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 477 / CAAS 477 / NRE 477. Women and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta E Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/477/001.nsf

This course explores issues related to gender, race, class, and environmental inequality. It looks at the historical role of women in the environment in the U.S., explores the development of environmental ideologies, and looks at the relationship between women, environment, and social justice. It examines environmental sub-movements like ecofeminism and environmental justice. The course also examines gender and inequality in the international context. In particular, it focuses on women and development issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 481 / NRE 481 / EDCURINS 474. Foundations of Environmental Education.

Section 001 — [4 credits; 3 for Education students].

Instructor(s): Michaela T Zint (zintmich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in English composition. (4; 3 for School of Education students). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 for School of Education students).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/481/001.nsf

Provides a theoretical understanding of the field of environmental education (EE) with special emphasis on: relevant human behavior models; guidelines for developing, implementing, and evaluating EE materials/programs; and current issues in EE. Presents opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using popular EE materials and writing grant proposals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 481 / NRE 481 / EDCURINS 474. Foundations of Environmental Education.

Section 002 — [4 credits; 3 for Education students].

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in English composition. (4; 3 for School of Education students). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 for School of Education students).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides a theoretical understanding of the field of environmental education (EE) with special emphasis on relevant human behavior models, guidelines for developing, implementing, and evaluating EE materials/programs, and current issues in EE. Presents opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using popular EE materials and writing grant proposals. Education students should register for 3 credit hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 492 / NRE 492 / UP 492. Environmental Justice: Domestic and International.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bunyan I Bryant Jr (bbryant@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~snre492/492.html

This is primarily a lecture course. Information in the course includes:

  1. the definition of environmental racism, environmental equity, environmental justice, and environmental advocacy,
  2. key research issues in the field of environmental justice which includes race vs. income, intent vs. nonintent, pollution prevention vs. pollution control, cause and effect vs. association,
  3. understanding energy and its relation with environmental justice,
  4. the social structure of accumulation vs. the social structure of sustainability,
  5. comparing issues of environmental justice within the U.S. and within developing countries,
  6. comparing the Basel Treaty and the Organization of African Unity's ban on the transport of toxic waste internationally, and the First National Environmental Leadership Summits Seventeen Principles of Environmental Justice.

Both domestic and international examples will be used in the course to enhance teaching and learning. Students will be required to: (1) take a midterm and a final examination, and (2) develop case studies on environmental justice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for ENVIRON.


Page


This page was created at 6:52 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Advising Technology (webmaster_saa@umich.edu), G255-E Angell Hall

Copyright © 2003 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.