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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 7:04 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


Changes to Registration Procedures for Elementary Language Courses*

All students should be advised of the following changes in the Department of Romance Languages that may affect how they enroll in courses for Fall 2003.

  1. No waitlists. We have removed waitlists from all Romance Languages courses, which means that spaces may become available in all classes throughout the pre-registration process. If a particular section of a course is full, you should continue to monitor Wolverine Access because spaces may become available.
  2. New sections will open in most courses. The office staff will be monitoring enrollment and opening new sections of most elementary language courses.
  3. Contact the office for further assistance. If all sections of a course are full, please stop by 4108 MLB or e-mail rll.permissions@umich.edu with your Fall 2003 class schedule and the course you need to enroll in.

* Elementary language courses include: FRENCH 101, FRENCH 102, FRENCH 103, FRENCH 231, FRENCH 232, FRENCH 235, ITALIAN 101, ITALIAN 102, ITALIAN 103, ITALIAN 231, ITALIAN 232, SPANISH 101, SPANISH 102, SPANISH 103, SPANISH 231, SPANISH 232, SPANISH 275 and SPANISH 276.

Further information is available from: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html


FRENCH 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from FRENCH 101, 102, and 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/101/001.nsf

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 101. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 103. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/102/002.nsf

See FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is the continuation of FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 102.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/103/001.nsf

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the coordinator. Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be two hourly exams, three 25 minutes quizzes, a final exam, compositions, and two speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 111. First Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Completion of FRENCH 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 101, 102, or 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term, students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/232/003.nsf

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 003 — Advanced Practice in French Through Contemporary Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

1. The "French Republic."
2. Europe: The European Union — The European Monetary Union.
3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française."
4. Societal Issues: Unemployment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS.
5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption.
6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision.
7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï / Rap.

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union — The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, Permission of Department

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

See French 235.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, 5: Permission of Department

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics and culture through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union — The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

Bienvenue! Veuillez consulter l'emploi du temps distribué en classe au début du semestre pour la description du cours et le programme pour ce semestre. Chaque instructeur de 235 vous donnera toutes les précisions nécessaires au début ou dans le courant du semestre.

Ce site a été créé pour mettre à votre disposition des ressources utiles sur Internet; puisque le Web (ou la Toile) est vaste, chacun/e découvre des documents différents selon le parcours individuel suivi à chaque visite. Si vous découvrez donc des documents qui pourraient intéresser vos camarades de classe, signalez-les, s'il vous plaît, à vos professeurs pour qu'ils puissent les afficher ici. Merci bien et bonne navigation!

Note d'usage: Pour accéder aux ressources de ce site, cliquez d'abord sur "Resources" à gauche; de là, vous aurez les catégories de sites par thème de notre cours. Cliquez sur le thème désiré et une liste de sites apparaîtra. Il est important de savoir que lorsque vous aurez fini de regarder un site, fermez tout simplement l'écran et vous reviendrez à la liste de départ. Ces "Resources" sont le seul élément de UMCousetools que nous exploiterons dans ce cours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, Permission of Department

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/235/001.nsf

Bienvenue! Veuillez consulter l'emploi du temps distribué en classe au début du semestre pour la description du cours et le programme pour ce semestre. Chaque instructeur de 235 vous donnera toutes les précisions nécessaires au début ou dans le courant du semestre.

Ce site a été créé pour mettre à votre disposition des ressources utiles sur Internet; puisque le Web (ou la Toile) est vaste, chacun/e découvre des documents différents selon le parcours individuel suivi à chaque visite. Si vous découvrez donc des documents qui pourraient intéresser vos camarades de classe, signalez-les, s'il vous plaît, à vos professeurs pour qu'ils puissent les afficher ici. Merci bien et bonne navigation!

Note d'usage: Pour accéder aux ressources de ce site, cliquez d'abord sur "Resources" à gauche; de là, vous aurez les catégories de sites par thème de notre cours. Cliquez sur le thème désiré et une liste de sites apparaîtra. Il est important de savoir que lorsque vous aurez fini de regarder un site, fermez tout simplement l'écran et vous reviendrez à la liste de départ. Ces "Resources" sont le seul élément de UMCousetools que nous exploiterons dans ce cours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 240. French and Francophone Topics in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 002 — Assassins and Usurpers : Renaissance Reflections on Ambition. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): George Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Usurpers, assassins, and other agents of anarchy fascinated Renaissance writers. Although generally considered a time when national monarchies consolidated their political position in Europe, the age developed a darkly rich imagination of political chaos. From Machiavelli to Macbeth, the figure of the usurper appears either one of murderous and tragic political ambition or of courageous liberator. Four papers, presentation, and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Disease and Community.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study how various concepts of health and disease have been used throughout French literary, social and political history. What is normal and what is deviant? What are the links between medical science and literature? How was medicine used to define race and sexuality? If disease can be used as exclusion, can it also be used in a positive way? What is the AIDS crisis telling us about French society?

Readings: Montaigne, Chateaubriand, Zola, Maupassant, Barrès, Gide, Dreuilhe.

Film: La bête humaine, by Jean Renoir.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 — Literature of the Fantastic.

Instructor(s): Michele A Hannoosh

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/270/002.nsf

This course will examine the literature of the fantastic which flourished throughout the nineteenth century at the very heart of its seeming opposite, Realism. Through a study of works by Balzac, Gautier, Mérimée, Baudelaire and Maupassant, we will look at the features of the fantastic, the historical circumstances of its emergence and development, its ambiguous relationship to Realism, its status as a literature of subversion, and its role as an indicator of cultural ideals and anxieties.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 004 — Two's Company.

Instructor(s): Katherine Ibbett

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read some short texts from different periods that address the idea of the twosome from a range of perspectives. We won't be concentrating on romantic couples alone, but will stretch the understanding of "coupledom" to think about relations between any two people, and about how those relations might be explored. We will look at texts and films that suggest ways to think about friendship, about marriage, about the couple's relation to the state, and about the brother-sister bond. We will end the academic term on a less literary note, by thinking about the PACS debate in France and about the image of the couple presented in those debates, and we will read an essay by the French sociologist Eric Fassin, who writes about the question of gay marriage in the U.S. This course will also focus on improving your reading and writing skills in French; we will use the material as a springboard for your critical responses, and we'll spend some class time developing your writing abilities.

Montaigne, De l'amitié
Racine, Bérénice
Charrière, Lettres de Mistriss Henley
Rousseau, Le Lévite d'Ephraïm
Collected articles on the PACS, essay by Fassin

Films:
Truffaut, Jules et Jim
Denis, Nenette et Boni

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Tales, Legends & Childhood Memories in the Literature of Francophone Black Africa.

Instructor(s): Alain Michel Mabanckou (ambanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Amadou Hampaté Bâ, a Malian writer considered to be one of Africa's wise men, had said: "In Africa, when an old man dies, an entire library burns down." African societies are based, then, upon Speech, Memories that the old transmit to the young. Tales, legends, and childhood memories enable the richness of literature from contemporary Black Africa to be explained.

The objective of this course therefore is to show how traditions, customs, and beliefs are important elements of a culture. They are also a means of understanding how today's African societies attempt to link Tradition and Modernity.

Bibliography:

  • Contes initiatiques peulhs, Amadou Hampaté Bâ ( Mali )
  • Le Pagne noir, Bernard Dadié ( Ivory Coast)
  • L'Enfant noir, Camara Laye ( Guinea )
  • L'Enterrement de ma mère, Alain Mabanckou ( Congo )

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 331. French Literature in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — African Literature: Mythology and Cosmology. Meets with CAAS 358.002.

Instructor(s): Alain Mabanckou (amabanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Only one literature in translation course may be considered in the completion for the concentration requirements.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In what way should the imagination of Black Africa be understood? How do people invent gods? Where does the idea of the Devil come from? Where does the idea of a World divided between Good and Evil come from? Do inanimate objects have a soul? Is there life after death? Africa is, without a doubt, one continent for which beliefs are very important. By examining the works of writers and great storytellers from Africa, this course will show how one can preserve a culture by means of myths and legends on a continent in which oral tradition is a fundamental element. Books 1.The Dark Child (by Camara Laye ) ISBN: 080 901 548X 2.The Black Cloth : A collection of African Folktales ( by Bernard Dadié ) ISBN: 087 023 5575 3.The palm-wine drunkard and my life in the bush of Ghosts ( by Amos Tutuola ) ISBN 080 213 3630

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on written production and textual interpretation. It will enhance one's writing and interpretative skills in French. Students will acquire stylistic, rhetorical, narrative, and prosodic tools indispensable in written activities and textual analysis. Course content will present essential elements of stylistics, rules of essay composition, analysis of press articles, prose and poetic literary texts, use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, and rules of punctuation. Readings will also include texts by Guillaume Apollinaire, Joachim du Bellay, Charles Baudelaire, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, etc. Final grade: several written exercises (30%), two quizzes (20%), three 3-4 page essays (30%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — How Do We Look?: Desire, Seduction, and the Cinematic Gaze.

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will consider ways of looking ... at movies, at the movies, at other people, at other people at the movies, at people in the movies, at ourselves. How does a film look (to us, at us, at itself)? How does a character look on screen (to us, at us, at other characters, at herself — say — in a mirror)? We will look for answers to these questions by looking… at French and Francophone films that propose models for or theorize ways of looking. In particular, we will examine parallels between the role of the gaze in desire and seduction on the one hand and the visual aspect of "reading" films on the other. How are we seduced by the films we watch? How can we desire, fall in love with characters on screen? How do we learn to fall in love by looking at love stories? While this is not a course in French film history, nor will the films be screened in chronological order, considerable attention will be devoted to the importance of the French New Wave, particularly as it challenged conventional ways of looking at the movies at the same time as it overturned conventions for how movies were supposed to look. In a few films, we will also consider how France looked and looks at its colonized Others, as objects of both desire and repulsion.

Requirements:

Weekly response papers, take-home midterm, final paper.

Films (tentative list):

Jacques Demy, The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967)
Jean-Jaques Beineix, Diva (1981)
Jean Cocteau, Orpheus (1949)
Alain Robbe-Grillet, Eden and Afterwards (1971)
Jean-Luc Godard, First Name: Carmen (1983)
François Truffaut, Day for Night (1973)
Eric Rohmer, Chloe in the Afternoon (1972)
Agnès Varda, Vagabond (1985)
Chantal Ackerman, je tu il elle (1974) (Belgium)
Claude Jutra, Kamouraska (1973) (Québec)
Claire Denis, Chocolat (1988)
Nouri Bouzid, Bezness (1991) (Tunisia)

Readings:

Alain Robbe-Grillet, Jealousy (19)
Jean Baudrillard, Seduction (selections)
Laura Mulvey, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema"
Rey Chow, Primitive Passions: Visuality, Sexuality, Ethnography, and Contemporary Chinese Cinema (selection)
Roland Barthes, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments (selection)
Judith Butler, "The Force of Fantasy"
Judith Mayne, "Lesbian Looks: Dorothy Arzner and Female Authorship.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 — As Strange as Ourselves: Literatures of the Exotic in France. Taught In French.

Instructor(s): George Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How does the process of discovering others leads to self-discovery? The New World gave birth to modern times by encouraging Europeans to look at themselves with new eyes. Imagining what natives might think of French culture, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, led the French to a consciousness of their own truly foreign nature. Four papers, presentation, two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 367 / MEMS 377. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Mapping Early Modern Spaces.

Instructor(s): Katherine Ibbett

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore some early modern texts that travel around the notion of space. We'll look at how different genres structure space in different ways, and we'll consider ideas like the gendering of space, the relations between France and the foreign (both within Europe and without), the philosophical interior, the topography of the absolutist court, private and public spaces, and the relation between town and country. We'll be concentrating on canonical literary texts, but will look at other kinds of material, too, like letters sent home by missionaries in Canada, or accounts of embassies abroad. We'll accompany our texts with research into places like the palace of Versailles.

Du Bellay, Les regrets, Les antiquités de Rome (selection)
Labé, Sonnets
Shakespeare, As You Like It
Le Jeune et Lalement, Relation de ce qui s'est passé en la Nouvelle France (selection)
Descartes, Discours de la méthode
Lafayette, La princesse de Clèves
Racine, Bajazet
Sévigné, Lettres (selection)
Choisy, Mémoires (account of the French embassy to Siam)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 369. Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — The Gothic in Modern French Literature.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore some of the forms and themes of the Gothic through readings of 19th-century French authors: romantics and decadents, like Nodier, Gautier, Nerval, Villiers de l'Isle Adam, but also writers not usually associated with the Gothic sensibility, such as Hugo, Balzac, and Flaubert. Although the Gothic in France was originally a British import, and became widespread through translations from the English (e.g., Monk Lewis, and Horace Walpole), it soon took a life of its own. The vogue of primitivism, orientalism, and the medieval revival, in both literature and the arts, contributed to give the French gothic tale or novel its peculiar character. Moreover, unlike the British gothic novel, French gothic romances often betray the 'haunting' of history, in particular echoes of the French Revolution and the Terror. While the Gothic as a genre has obvious connections to the 18th century concept of the sublime, it also has something to tell about the cultural sensibilities of a period. Apart from offering another perspective on 19th century French literature, this course also proposes to explore the ideological implications of this literary phenomenon. What do, we will ask, the hybrid and terrifying distortions of the gothic imagination reveal about contemporary social anxieties.

Evaluation will be based on an expose, participation in class, and three short essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 380. Intermediate Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — This course will be conducted entirely in French.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235 and one additional FRENCH course numbered 250 and above. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 414.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Having attained a solid base in comprehension and communication strategies in French, students will have the opportunity to enhance their linguistic skills while learning about one of the most dynamic aspects of French culture: the Francophone Business world.

Class participants will be exposed to the differences between business situations in France and those in the U.S.; and they will learn to function comfortably within the cultural and linguistic register of the Francophone business domain.

We will study the basic elements of French and Francophone commerce, industry, and international trade, as well as the more practical skills of telephone conversations, letter writing, interview techniques, and general cultural interface in a business setting.

Typical examples of French companies will be studied and presented by students, using the Internet as their research source for the most up-to-date information. Videos, television excerpts, and newspaper articles will complement our text Carte de Visite, which itself includes video, audio, and supplementary conversation materials. We will use the grammar explanation and exercise books Grammaire by Hachette to continue improving linguistic skills.

Grades will be determined by writing assignments, class presentations, Midterm, Final, grammar work, and class participation.

This course will be conducted entirely in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 381. French Internship.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 380, and an offer of a summer internship. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

The aim of this course is to spend between 6-10 weeks during the Summer working abroad in a French-speaking country. Students will gain valuable hands-on experience in a true work environment, improving all aspects of their French language skills, as well as benefiting from the experience of living within another culture.

Timeframe: the student and instructor begin working on placement during the Winter Term. This involves detailed searching by students, completion of curriculum vitae in French, and letter writing. Once a position is secured, the student begins liaising with his/her contact in the sponsoring company. Also during the Winter semester, students attend several tutorials related to living and working in a French-speaking country. During the Summer, students travel to their companies and work for the agreed-on amount of time. They maintain close contact with the professor of FRENCH 381 with weekly reports via email, and also keep a regular journal in French. The instructor will fulfill a mentoring role, as well as monitoring each student in term s of their progress and success in their position. Once the Internship is completed, the student enrolls in FRENCH 381 for the Fall semester. During this academic term, the student is required to write a 20-page paper in French relating their areas of learning while abroad, concentrating particularly on enhanced language skills, acquired job skills, and elements of cultural awareness. Students are also required to prepare a 10-15 minute presentation of their experience in French, which will be performed for prospective internship students and faculty members. Most internships are unpaid. Some travel funding is available.

Requirements: Desirable, but not required, FRENCH 380 or FRENCH 414. Students will be assessed on their readiness and ability to live and work in a foreign environment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Independent study. Students must gain consent of the French honors committee to enroll.

Course content is designed with a faculty advisor. Work should consist of readings of selected works from French literature, conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

FRENCH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Independent study. Requires consent of French honors committee to enroll.

Students should find a faculty member to sponsor them. Class work consists of readings of selected works from French literature, conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FRENCH 438 / ROMLING 456 / EDCURINS 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/438/001.nsf

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods and techniques used in language teaching with emphasis on those that develop the language learner's proficiency in using French for real-world purposes. Readings, lectures, and discussions will be on theoretical issues and current research in language learning and teaching as well as on practical applications to the secondary school language teaching context. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. By examining and understanding theories and research about language learning and teaching, pre-service teachers will be in a position to make informed choices about teaching, selection of teaching materials, and creation of their own teaching activities and to justify these choices to future students, colleagues, administrators, and parents. During the semester, students will have opportunities to practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the School of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to:

  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 465. Literature of the Nineteenth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Poetry and Painting in Nineteenth-Century France.

Instructor(s): Michele A Hannoosh

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/465/001.nsf

French poets of the nineteenth century were preoccupied with painting: its means and materials, the subjects of its representation, its status in the hierarchy and history of the arts. Some of the richest and most innovative poetry of the period was that which sought to explore this relationship with another, different art, attempting to create a poetic language which would incorporate the benefits of the visual image. In this course, we will examine the many ways in which the major poets of the century — Baudelaire, Gautier, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, among others — addressed this crucial question: exploiting the visual potential of language, creating poems inspired by particular paintings or appropriating a specifically visual style, experimenting with spatial structure as in a picture, actively collaborating with artists in illustrations of poetry. Through a combination of focused close reading, on the one hand, and attention to the broader "inter-art" connection, on the other, the course should ultimately lead to a better understanding not only of nineteenth-century French poetry, but of the concept of the poetic or literary "image" itself. The course will fulfill the upper-division writing requirement for undergraduates. Graduate students will write a term paper only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (FRENCH 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/frenchhonors.pdf

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/frenchhonors.pdf

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Graduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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