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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies


This page was created at 7:01 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



HJCS 100 / AAPTIS 100 / ACABS 100 / HISTORY 132. Peoples of the Middle East.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu) , Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://cgi.www.umich.edu/~nes100/F03/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew, I.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002 — For students with no background and experience in Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Paula Weizman (pauliw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/hjcs/101/001.nsf

Sections 001 and 002 of Modern Elementary Hebrew I are for students with no background and experience in Hebrew. Students with previous knowledge of Hebrew will be directed to Sections 003 and 004.

The focus of instruction is on learning the alphabet and developing basic speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills in modern Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew, I.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004 — For students with previous knowledge of Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Milka Eliav (milka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sections 003 and 004 are for students with previous knowledge of Hebrew. Students with no background in Hebrew will be directed to sections 001 and 002.

The focus of instruction is on learning the alphabet and developing basic skills in modern Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 200 / ACABS 200 / AAPTIS 200 / RELIGION 201. Introduction to World Religions: Near Eastern.

General Near Eastern Studies

Section 001 — Religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu) , Alexander D Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu) , Yaron Z Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/religion/201/001.nsf

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 200.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 201. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Doron Lamm (dlamm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 102. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 201. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, I.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Ilan Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 102. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction is on the development of advanced language skills with an emphasis on oral and written communication and in standard modern Hebrew. In addition to reading texts, relevant cultural materials are provided through the use of video and technology based materials. This course is taught in small sections and class discussion. The final grade is based on class activities, students presentations, written assignments, and unit tests: midterm and final. Class discussions and activities are exclusively in Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 276 / JUDAIC 205. Introduction to Jewish Civilizations and Culture.

General HJCS

Section 001 — Meets with HJCS 576.001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 576.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/judaic/205/001.nsf

See Judaic Studies 205.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 291. Topics in Hebrew and Judaic Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Myth and Legend in Judaism: Folklore as Interpretation of Culture. Meets with Judaic 317.001.

Instructor(s): Eli Yassif

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Myth was opposed to the "official" forms of Jewish religion since biblical times. Its foreign sources and tendency toward pagan ideology, posed a threat to the monotheistic, legal Judaism. However, myths and legends appear in almost all Jewish writings since the Hebrew Bible: Apocryphal literature, the Talmud and Midrash, medieval literature of all genres, and in Early-Modern Jewish folklore. In the course will be read a selection of texts from all the range of Jewish literature, with special emphasis on their oral, fokloric character, their essential messages, and the tension between these "informal" texts and the "official" forms of Judaism. Jewish myths and legends provide another important source of understanding Jewish culture. They are the main vehicle that the Jewish "folk" — not the leaders and thinkers — chose to express their mentality, fears, and hopes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 301. Advanced Hebrew, I.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Instructor(s): Shachar Pinsker ( @umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 202. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the third-year course within the Hebrew language sequence at the University of Michigan. As such, it constitutes a transitional stage from the lower levels — in which the concern is with learning introductory grammar and acquisition of functional vocabulary — to the more advanced levels in which we will focus on the more complex linguistic structures. At this level we will treat original texts which will serve as the jumping-off point for in-class discussion and the basis for composition of essays at home. The goal is to expose the student to a wide range of texts as a window unto "the Israeli Experience." The course will incorporate other communications media, e.g., material recorded on audio tape, video clips, and multi-media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HJCS 471. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature, I.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Taught in Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 302. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The thematic focus of this introductory course to Hebrew literature is Home and the way it figures as a national, religious, secular, collective, or ethnic metaphor. What has the Home become for second and third generation of Diaspora Jews? How is the notion of being home or being in exile articulated in the literature through writing on issues of territory, nativity, exile, or subjectivity? Do women or children write differently about the concept of Home? In this course, we will read a wide range of literary texts of different periods and genres, focusing on the aesthetics and poetics of Hebrew, discussing the relevant issues in Jewish/Israeli history and culture. This course will be taught in Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 477 / JUDAIC 478 / RELIGION 478. Modern Jewish Thought.

Judaic Cultural Studies in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of selected 20th-century Jewish thinkers and their response to the crisis of modernity (and post-modernity): the breakdown of traditional Jewish culture and its system of meaning; the encounter with, and assimilation of, Western culture; the impact of the traumas of World War II and the Holocaust; and the contemporary quest for intimacy and tikkun, or "healing." Authors studied include Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, A.J. Heschel, and the radical theologian Richard Rubenstein; the Hebrew authors Bialik and Agnon; the feminist theologian Judith Plaskow; and the mystically inflected work of Arthur Green. Lecture and discussion; take-home midterm; 10-15 page paper; final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 478 / JUDAIC 468 / RELIGION 469. Jewish Mysticism.

Judaic Cultural Studies in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe, meditational practices, and social ramifications. While we will survey mystical traditions from the late second Temple period through modernity, the central focus will be on the rich medieval stream known as kabbalah. Among the issues to be explored are:

  • the nature of mystical experience;
  • images of God, world, and Person;
  • sexual and gender symbolism (images of the male and female);
  • the problem of evil;
  • mysticism, language, and silence;
  • mysticism and the law;
  • mysticism and community;
  • meditative and ecstatic practices (ranging from visualization to chant, letter combination, and modulated breathing);
  • kabbalistic myth and ritual innovation; and
  • kabbalistic interpretations of history.

Modern interpretations of mysticism will also be considered. Readings for the course consist of secondary sources from the history of Judaism and comparative religion, and selected primary texts (in translation). Requirements include two exams and a research paper. Class lectures will be supplemented by discussion, contemplative exercises, and on occasion, music and other media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Sacred Space in Graeco-Roman Palestine: The Case of The Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Meets with JUDAIC 591.001 and ACABS 491.002.

Instructor(s): Yaron Z Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 491.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 — Israeli Film and Theatre.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course parallels HJCS 301 and is designed primarily with heritage students (Bney Yisra'elim) and other advanced Hebrew students in mind. It aims to build bridges between language class and upper division Hebrew literature and culture classes. In this course, we will develop further reading, listening, and writing competencies, and, at the same time, explore different writing styles via the media of Hebrew theater and film. More than focusing on systematic language acquisition, the course builds on and strengthens fluency. Our discussions will focus on award winning plays, critically acclaimed films, and popular TV productions, helping to broaden our historical perspective of Israeli culture, and deepen our understanding of its complexities. As part of the course requirements, students must actively participate in class discussions, submit written assignments, and contribute to the final project of a short play or video production. Because this course is taught entirely in Hebrew, instructor's approval is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HJCS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HJCS 591. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — The Midrashic Narrative: Literary Reading of Rabbinic Stories. Meets with JUDAIC 591.002.

Instructor(s): Eli Yassif

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We shall read and present selected texts from the Talmudic-Midrashic and medieval Hebrew literature, in their original language and in translation. The selection will be of various genres and topics: rewritten biblical stories, myths, sages' legends, gender tales, fables, magic tales, and humorous narratives. The reading will concentrate on two methodological issues:

  1. The "story in contexts": each story will be presented in its religious, historical, moral, interpretive context;
  2. The generic imperative: how the literary analysis of rabbinic texts provides an essential vehicle for their interpretation.

    We shall read: the creation of the first woman; the sacrifices of Isaac; tales of the revolt against Rome; Akiva's wife and Beruriah the sage woman; the tales of destruction and revival in Midrash of Lamentations; the Story of R.Simeon ben Shatah and the witches; the tall tales of Rabbah bar-bar-Hannah.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


    Graduate Course Listings for HJCS.


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