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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 7:05 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



HISTORY 110 / MEMS 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Luigi Berto

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The first half of the European history survey course covers a sweeping period of over a millennium. The course is designed to expose students to general outlines and chronology of European history and to encourage critical, skeptical analytical thinking. To anchor our flying coverage of this long and varied time, we will focus on developments in culture (art, architecture, literature), social organization (family, community, gender relations), and in political organization and theory. Readings will include a textbook, primary sources, challenging interpretive essays. Lecture time will be punctuated by small-group discussions, and active participation is strongly encouraged. Slides will frequently accompany lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 132 / AAPTIS 100 / ACABS 100 / HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu) , Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://cgi.www.umich.edu/~nes100/F03/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 144 / ASIAN 154. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Em

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/154/001.nsf

See Asian Studies 154.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maris A Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Required readings may be purchased at Shaman Drum and are on reserve at the UGLi.

  • Mary Beth Norton, et al., A People and a Nation: A History of the United States to 1877
  • William Bruce Wheeler and Susan D. Becker, Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence
  • Betty Wood, The Origins of American Slavery: Freedom and Bondage in the English Colonies
  • Joy Day Buel and Richard Buel, Jr., The Way of Duty: A Woman and Her Family in Revolutionary America
  • William Otter, History of My Own Times
  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself
  • Robert Hunt Rhodes, ed., All for the Union: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Elisha Hunt Rhodes.

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HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Fitzpatrick (fitzd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second half of the basic, introductory survey of American history. It addresses the development of the American nation from the end of the Civil War to the present day. The focal point of the course is the changing nature of the concept of freedom during this period. In this context the course will examine the evolution of the United States from an agrarian nation with little concern for foreign affairs to the world's preeminent power with self-defined global interests. This examination necessarily will focus on the lives of individual citizens; the transformation of the labor force and the workplace; and the role played by race, ethnicity, class, and gender in determining one's place within the greater society. In so doing the course will investigate the era's major reform movements as well as the reasons for and reaction to the nation's increased involvement in international affairs.

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HISTORY 171 / GERMAN 171. Coming to Terms with Germany.

Section 001 — Germany and the New Europe.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 171.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 001 — Inventing the U.S.-Mexico Border.

Instructor(s): Andrew Needham (tneedham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/195/001.nsf

This course will investigate how various people and groups have defined and understood the border separating the United States and Mexico from the 19th century to the present. We will be concerned both with the administration of the boundary line between the two nations and with the intersection of the two nations in a borderlands society. The focal point of the course is the constant remaking of the meaning of the border as a result of political and social pressures from both Mexican and U.S. society. We will examine writing, films, and music from a variety of perspectives: national governments, border rebels, corridos, Hollywood and Mexican cinema, and borderlands writers and poets.

Writing requirements will include several short analytical papers and a longer research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 002 — Pirates, Priests, and Purveyors: Premodern Japan and the East Asian Maritime World.

Instructor(s): Peter Shapinsky

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/195/002.nsf

How can we understand the historical roles of seafarers like castaways, merchants, priests, ambassadors, and the pirates who preyed upon them; invasions, pilgrimage, tribute, and diplomacy; art as communication; cartography and navigation; conceptions of barbarian and civilized? Rather than focusing on the history of one state evolving in relative isolation, this course explores dynamics of maritime cross-cultural exchange. Historians of Japan in particular have relied heavily on the myth of an "island nation" bearing both the curses and blessings resulting from periodically opening itself to and closing itself off from the rest of the world. Instead of the traditional historical narrative focusing on the political and cultural centers of Japan, this course seeks to re-envision the history of Japan by exploring the interactions of its inhabitants with the premodern maritime world.

As a writing seminar, this course also will be devoted to the development of critical reading, thinking, and writing skills. Through written projects and discussion, we will investigate the East Asian maritime world through a wide variety of primary sources from translated documents, diaries, and poetry, to maps and paintings, we will learn to critically assess secondary historical scholarship, and explore theoretical perspectives on cross-cultural exchange.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 003 — Writing the American Revolution.

Instructor(s): Jason Barrett

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In "Writing the American Revolution," we will examine the Revolutionary experience through diverse documentary sources: from pamphlets and treatises to diaries and correspondence to sermons and plays written by contemporaries. Our goal will be to develop a working familiarity with the chronology of the Revolutionary period, and to compare its participants' use of these various literary genres to explain what they hoped to accomplish and their evaluation of what they in fact accomplished through Independence.

Students will write three medium-length papers and a term-long research project. The course will be conducted as a writing workshop: students should be prepared to discuss their writing in class and to have their writing constructively critiqued by their peers.

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 004 — Poverty and the Poor in Industrial Britain, 1834-1950.

Instructor(s): Alice Ritscherle (alicemr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Throughout England's protracted Industrial Revolution, work regimens associated with factory production, the emergence of an agricultural and urban proletariat, and chronic unemployment among certain classes of workers inspired a great deal of theorizing about the underlying causes of endemic poverty. In this course, students will consider various nineteenth and early twentieth-century attitudes towards the poor and destitute, focusing particularly on the ways that middle-class philanthropists, social reformers, and employers came to understand poverty as natural, inevitable, and even deserved. Some of the most prolific writers on the subject of Britain's economy, the founders of classical liberal economic theory, argued that the state should not interfere with the free market in labor, regulate wage levels, or provide assistance to poor people, even those in dire circumstances. Moreover, depictions of the poor contained in literature and popular newspapers rarely accounted for the failure of the free market to provide employment or adequate wages for all people able to work. Instead, liberal theorists and popular representations of the poor often conveyed the message that poverty was the result of individual failure and moral weakness.

In this course, we will focus heavily on nineteenth-century representations of the poor by middle-class social workers, missionaries, and medical officers working in England's slums. We will consider the ways that middle-class philanthropists' strictures on child-rearing, alcohol consumption, gambling, and household budgeting among poor people reflected popular assumptions about gender and respectable behavior among the so-called 'deserving' and 'undeserving' poor. We will also consider ways that liberal theorists and policy makers in England wrote about work and poverty in two of Britain's colonies, Ireland and Jamaica, in order to explore the ways in which ideas about race and ethnicity factored into analyses of poverty. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will produce several short reaction papers, in addition to one long, polished paper of about fifteen pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 005 — Folk Heroes and Historical Martyrs. Meets with ANTHRCUL 298.001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Gaynor (jgaynor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine historical figures who have also become folk heroes. What sorts of people were they to have captured the popular imagination, motivating others to conceive of themselves in novel ways and inspiring them to take action — in some cases against the odds? What made these figures emblematic and emulable for the people who looked to them? Why do their names continue to evoke powerful associations? And how are the iconographies and ideas connected to them appropriated and re-worked in subsequent social and political movements?

We will compare folk heroes by looking at them in two ways: first, by considering the historical contexts from which they emerge, and second, by examining the ways they are taken up in popular discourses and practices. The figures we will consider include: Joan of Arc, Billy the Kid, Jose Rizal, and Nelson Mandela. Readings will draw on primary and secondary historical sources, as well as on literary materials. This course is writing intensive and satisfies the first-year writing requirement (when elected as HISTORY 195).

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HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 006 — Women and Law in America, 1600-1825.

Instructor(s): Kristin Olbertson (olbertso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the many ways in which women's lives were affected by legal rules and practices in early America, and how women's age, race, and class also affected their relationships to the law. Major topics include marriage, widowhood, and divorce; crime; slavery; civil rights; labor; cultural contact; and witchcraft. This course will provide a solid foundation from which students can further explore in history, women's studies, and law. Students will also improve their abilities as critical readers and thinkers, and develop the skills to write clearly and persuasively. They will do so by participating actively in class discussion of weekly reading assignments, by producing and revising short weekly writing assignments, and by researching and writing one longer paper.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 — Tradition, Modernization, Nationalism, and War in 20th Century Asia.

Instructor(s): Rhoads Murphey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is to introduce the student to that more than half of the world which lies in Asia, as it moved from tradition and modernization to nationalism and the outbreak of war: between China and Japan, Japan and Russia, and finally the Pacific War and the coming of independence for India and Southeast Asia. It begins with two essays surveying the period, and moves on to consider the modernization and the place of tradition in India the struggle of China against foreign semi-colonialism, India's progress toward freedom, the varied experiences of Southeast Asia under colonial rule, the rise of the military in Japan and its war with China, the coming of the Pacific War, the death of colonialism, the partition of India, and Vietnam's thirty years of war. There are four essays required, one at the end of each section of the course. The readings include a variety of sources, some primary, some secondary, and the course is organized as much as possible on a discussion basis. No previous knowledge of Asia is assumed. Grades are based on the essays and on participation in class.

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HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 004 — Women's History/Women's Words. Meets with AMCULT 102.001 & WOMENSTD 151.002.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will be run as a colloquium and will explore the history of the United States as seen from women's perspectives. We will read first hand commentaries by women from the early colonial period through to the present. These commentaries will range from Indian Captivity and slave narratives, to the correspondences of presidential wives (Abigail Adams, Eleanor Roosevelt) and plantation mistresses, to autobiographies to novels by such luminaries of American literature as Toni Morrison, Edith Wharton, and Willa Cather. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences, exploring both the world of Native Americans and Latinas, leisured ladies, college students, slaves and immigrant women, straight and gay women. Sexuality, child birth, marriage and alternatives to marriage, rights to full citizenship, to education and employment, all will play central roles in this course as will the ways women were flought to authorize themselves as writers and political figures. Readings will include such books as Toni Morrison's Beloved, Audre Lorde's Zami, Adrienne Rich's erotic poetry, Edith Wharton's House of Mirth, Mary Rowlandson's Indian captivity narrative and native writer Louise Erdich's Beet Queen, Harriet Jacob's Narrative of a Slave Girl.

The writing requirement for the course will consist of weekly response papers, due before the beginning of each class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 006 — Black Expatriate Writing.

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines (gaineskk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine a selection of works of fiction and non-fiction by writers of African descent who found expatriation or chosen exile from their countries of origin enabling to their critical interrogation of the condition of the U.S. Blacks and African peoples. We will be concerned, as well, with these writers' analyses of the legacies of mass movements for Black liberation. Among the authors we will consider are James Baldwin, Mayo Angelou, Jna Carew, Maryse Conde, and Chester Himes.

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HISTORY 200. Greece to 201 B.C.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Homer, Aristotle and Socrates, Odysseus, Pericles and Alexander the Great, Medea, Cassandra and Atnigone, Athens, Sparta and Troy...names and places that pop up in many different contexts. Wouldn't it be great to know who and what they really were and why these names and places still carry meaning today? This survey course introduces participants to ancient Greece from the Mycenaean age to the end of the Hellenistic period. It covers ancient works of literature as well as inscriptions, papyri, coins, and archaeological evidence. Lectures and the section discussions focus on the development of Greek society, the role of the individual in Greek history, and the dynamics of historical change. Throughout the term, corresponding and contrasting issues relevant to our own society and history will be addressed. There will be two exams. Each will include essay questions and also test knowledge of historical figures, places and events (2 x 30% of the grade). 20% of the grade will be based on contributions to discussions in sections, the remaining 20% on assignments and quizzes in sections. HISTORY 200 is the "prequel" to HISTORY 201 (The Roman Empire and Its Legacy). Textbook: R. Morkot, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece (1996). NO PREREQUISITES. EVERYBODY WELCOME.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 204(121) / ASIAN 204. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the history of East Asia before 1700, with an emphasis on China, Korea, and Japan. It aims to provide an overview of the main trends which not only transformed the society, politics, economy, and culture of each country but also laid the ground for future shaping of this region into three distinctly different but closely connected modern nations. Confucian style governments, gender relations, popular religions, peasant rebellions, technological innovation, and demographic shifts are some of the topics we will cover.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 206(151) / ASIAN 206. Indian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the civilizations of India, that is, the region of South Asia consisting of the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

We will concentrate on five topics through the ages, covering the period from the Harappan Civilizations to the present. These are:

  1. the state in South Asia;
  2. attitudes to the body, male and female;
  3. social hierarchies, especially class and caste;
  4. religions, sects, and belief systems;
  5. the arts and the experience of everyday life.

The course is organized thematically and not chronologically. While dealing with each topic, we will look at at least the following time points in history to maintain a balanced overview of the history: Harappan civilizations; classical India; the Delhi Sultanate; the Mughal empire; the colonial period; and contemporary India.

Requirements for the course will be somewhat unconventional: a quiz on facts; a test in historical analysis; extra-textual presentation; and a problem-solving exercise on contemporary India.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 207(152) / ASIAN 207. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/207/001.nsf

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State

  • David Steinberg et al, In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 210 / MEMS 210. Early Middle Ages, 300-1100.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrick James Nold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/210/001.nsf

The decline of Rome and the rise of Germanic monarchy, the Carolingian and Ottonian Empires, the growth of feudalism, and monasticism and papal reform. The emphasis is on the political and institutional development of Western European society and its relations with Byzantium and Islam.

Readings:

  • B. Rosenwein, A Short History of the Middle Ages (2002):
  • Augustine, Confessions, trans. Henry Chadwick (OUP, 1991)
  • Bede, The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (OUP, 1994)
  • Early Christian Lives, trans. C. White (Penguin, 1998)
  • Gregory of Tours, The History of the Franks (Penguin, 1974)
  • Two Lives of Charlemagne, trans. L. Thorpe (Penguin, 1969)

In addition to the textbooks mentioned above, could the following books be placed on reserve in the library:

  • D-houda, Handbook for William: A Carolingian Woman's Counsel for her son (University of Nebraska Press, 1991)
  • The Koran, trans. N. J. Dawood (Penguin, 2000)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 212 / MEMS 212. The Renaissance.

Section 001 — Meets with Institute for the Humanities 211.001.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/212/002.nsf

This course will explore the social and cultural history of Europe from about 1350 to 1550, a period of momentous change: scientific experiment placed the sun rather than the earth at the center of the universe; the state emerged as a political entity; exploration made Europeans aware of sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas; scholarship recovered the lost texts and ideas of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds; art, medicine, and philosophy renewed an interest in the physical and psychological nature of man; and the printing press made these changes available to a much wider public. We will explore the substance and consequence of such changes, including some negative ones, such as the expulsion of Muslim and Jews from Spain, censorship, and colonial exploitation. Many readings will be taken from documents of the period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 220. Survey of British History to 1688.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this course, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

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HISTORY 241. War in the Twentieth Century Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/war/war.htm

This course treats the impact and experience of warfare on the Twentieth Century Middle East. It examines the impact of the World Wars, the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli Wars, Afghanistan, the Gulf Wars, and the War on Terror on the shaping of the 20th-century Middle East. Grading is based upon a midterm and a final.

Texts: (Available at Shaman Drum Books and at the Undergrad. Library Reserve Reading Rm. Course pack is at Dollar Bill.

  • Larry Goodson. Afghanistan's Endless War. (U of Washington Press, 2001).
  • Michael Gordon and Bernard Trainor. The Generals' War. (Little, Brown, 1998.)
  • Steven Heydemann, ed., War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (University of California Press, 2000).
  • John Miller and Michael Stone. The Cell. (New York: Hyperion, 2002).
  • Beverly Milton-Edwards and Peter Hinchcliffe. Conflicts in the Middle East since 1945. (London: Routledge, 2001).
  • Bob Woodward. Bush at War. (New York: Simon and Shuster, 2002).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 246(446) / CAAS 246. Africa to 1850.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the pre-colonial African past, from the early prehistory of the human to the eve of Europe's second great wave of empire when Africans across most of the continent became the subjects of European colonies. The second European empires (from roughly the 1870s through the 1960s) have had profound influence on Africa, yet important global forces were affecting Africa long before the mid-nineteenth century. Moreover, the shapes that Africa would take under the influence of European empire would be strongly conditioned by the course of change on the continent before 1850 and by the nature of society and culture on the continent stretching back for more than a millennium.

The major objective of this course is to establish a deeper understanding of the forces, institutions, and processes that underlay the experiences of Africans and the African continent before 1850. The post-1850 history of Africa will be taken up by Professor Diouf during the second term, in HISTORY 247.

Over the past five decades, the reconstruction of the African past — from archaeological evidence, from oral testimonies, and from historical linguistics and from other methods and materials — has been one of the most remarkable departures in the historical sciences, taking the professional craft of history beyond its signature: the written document. Of course, the peoples of Africa long enjoyed a rich knowledge of their past and a deep engagement with history, well before the emergence of the professional practice of history on the continent. And a critical factor in the shaping of Africa's futures has been the production and control of histories for and about the continent.

Albeit the breakthroughs in the reconstruction of Africa's past, and albeit the importance of historical knowledge to Africans, Africa is substantially "known" today — by those outside Africa, by the international press, by the aid and development and the human rights communities — through a shallow and relatively presentist understanding, partially based on direct observation, partially based on persistent and pervading myths and fantasies about Africa, myths that have their own significant histories. The course will encourage a more complex understanding of Africa and a sense of African history as a work-in-progress.

The course will explore:

  • Africa's earliest history
  • The histories and fates of pre-colonial empires, kingdoms, and states across the continent
  • The shapes of African culture and society
  • The Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on Africa
  • The rise of Islam in Africa
  • The relations of Europe and Africa before the second European empires
  • Basic conditions of life in pre-colonial Africa
  • African modernities before "modernity"

Among the main questions, the recurrent questions:

  • Africa's Past: How has it come to be known, understood, comprehended, explained?
  • Africa's Cultures: The utility of models of continuity and change?
  • Africa's Civilizations: The ethics of autocracy and domination?
  • Africa's Connections to the Wider World: Determined or negotiated?
  • Africa's Economies: The fates of value and equity in extractive economies?
  • Africa's Resources: Whose materials, to what use, to what effect?

The course will be organized around lectures, readings, discussions, the viewing of several films from Africa.

Course requirements:

  1. Participation in class discussion. 15%.
  2. A critical book review of a monograph from the "recommended list" — three to four pages. 25%.
  3. Midterm exam. 25%.
  4. Final exam constructed, in essay form, around the "recurrent questions" above. 35%.

Reading List:

  • Boubacar Barry, Senegambia and the Atlantic Trade Slave, Cambridge University Press, 1998
  • Maryse Conde, Segu, London, Penguin Books
  • John K. Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Makings of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800, (2nd edition), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998
  • The Kongolese Saint Anthony. Dona Beatriz Kimpa and The Antonian 1684-1706 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999
  • Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, New York, Saint Martin's Press (Revised Edition), 1995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 250. China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of a survey of early Chinese history, with special emphasis on the origins and development of the political, social, and economic institutions and their intellectual foundations. Special features include class participation in performing a series of short dramas recreating critical issues and moments in Chinese history, slides especially prepared for the lectures, new views on race and gender in the making of China, intellectual and scientific revolutions in the seventeenth century, and literature and society in premodern China.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu), Margaret L Steneck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist265/

The University of Michigan has been a leader in shaping the modern American university. This course examines the University's history from the perspective of students, faculty, fields of study, administration, and alumni. It will also explore the factors that have shaped the University and place it within its larger social, political, national, and international contexts. The primary prerequisite is an interest in your University and its place in history.

Lectures are accompanied by extensive slide presentations and a few movies. Readings include a course pack and textbook. Grading is based on essay/objective exams; two short papers or a term project; and a campus tour photo quiz to acquaint students with central campus, its architecture and embellishments. Two of the five discussion sections (taught by the course instructors) are limited to upper-class enrollment only and will encourage UM-related projects.

Books, available at the bookstores; some used copies may be available:
Ruth Bordin, Women at Michigan: The "Dangerous Experiment," 1870s to the Present. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 1999.
Jerry Harju, The Class of '57. Marquette, MI: Lake Superior Press, 1997.
Howard Peckham, The Making of the University of Michigan, edited and updated by Margaret L. and Nicholas H. Steneck. Ann Arbor, MI: Bentley Historical Library, 1994.

Course packs, available at Ulrich's Bookstore:
M.L. & N.H. Steneck, Campus Practicum, 2001 Edition. (Available after February 19)
History 265 Course pack. Winter 2001 edition.

*Two copies of Peckham, Bordin, Harju and the Campus Practicum are on UGLI reserve.

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HISTORY 266. Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars — real and imagined — have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

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HISTORY 275 / CAAS 231. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 231.001.

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HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as:

  • the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health;
  • the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making;
  • the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers;
  • the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure";
  • the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and
  • the changing organization and power of the healing professions.

We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course.

Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. Required Readings:

  • Leavitt and Numbers, Sickness and Health in America
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years
  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange
  • DeKruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Pernick, The Black Stork
  • Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science
  • Cours pack from Dollar Bill
  • (Warner and Tighe, Major Problems in History of American Medicine — under consideration, not yet decided — to be announced later.)

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HISTORY 285. Science, Technology, and Society: 1940 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The enterprise of science changed dramatically after WWII, both intellectually and socially. The consequences of being able to split the atom and, more recently, to engineer biological blueprints have made science literally a life and death activity that touches every human. This course will explore the growth and implications of scientific and technological development from the end of WWII to the present. There will be two lectures and one discussion per week. Students will work in small groups on one problem during the term, e.g., energy, pollution, global warming, health care issues. Each group will hand in a jointly written report at the end of term and present a class report. Three or four books will be assigned reading. Students will be expected to make use of e-mail and conferencing.

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HISTORY 286 / RELIGION 286. A History of Eastern Christianity from the 4th to the 18th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces Eastern Christianity from the 4th through the 18th century. A broad survey course aimed at undergraduates of all concentrations, there are no prerequisites; the course focuses on both Church history and theology. It begins with Constantine's conversion and traces the growth of the Church, the rise of monasticism, the creation of the creed (the Councils of Nicea and Chalcedon), and the secession of the Eastern churches (Coptic and Syriac), the role of religious pictures and the iconoclast dispute and relations with the West (Rome) which were frequently strained before the official break in the 11th century. We cover the conversion of the Slavs and the eventual formation of independent Slavic national churches. We treat the fall of the Byzantine and Medieval Slavic states to the Turks and the position of the Orthodox under the Turks. Attention is also given to the Russian Church from the 9th century to the Old Believer schism and Church reforms of Peter the Great. Readings are varied. There is no textbook. A relevant paper of the student's choice, an hour exam, and a final are required.

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HISTORY 300. Epidemics Throughout History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joel Howell (jhowell@umich.edu), Powel Kazanjian

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students will study several epidemics that have transformed the world, including plague in ancient Athens, leprosy in the European middle ages, and HIV/AIDS and SARS throughout the modern world. Themes will include the nature of demographic and epidemiological change, the social and cultural significance of each scourge, the organized public health response to each epidemic, the epidemics' impact on health, and the development of medical therapeutics and technologies. This course will provide a historical perspective on past diseases as well as on what today's lay public expects from health professionals. It will also demonstrate how studying responses to an epidemic can provide insights into the nature of a specific society. The class will include lectures, audiovisual presentations, and discussions. Students will read both primary documents and interpretive essays and will be evaluated by two short papers. A final exam will be a combination of short answer and essay questions.

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HISTORY 301. Discovery of the Universe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rpl/301syllabus.htm

How did we get here? What's going on? Where are we going with this? These questions define the physical sciences, and this course examines the history of the ways and means, human, observational, experimental, and theoretical, that astronomers and physicists have used to answer them. The course begins with what has been called the "Scientific Revolution," with Galileo and the Inquisition, but quite rapidly we come to the nineteenth century, and the heart of the course is on the development of our study of the universe, its origin, structure, and future, during the last few generations. Among topics we shall consider are the financing of science, the politics and security implications of modern research, history of computers, the roles of women, the geographical and cultural spread of research, popularization and demonization of science, pseudo-science, and the various contexts of science, in addition to the development of research and thought. So this is a history, and not a science, course, although many of the readings will come from scientists themselves, and our discussions will be centered on the human history rather than on the science itself.

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HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 001 — Law and Colonialism: The British Empire. Meets with History 596.001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Sturman (rsturman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/596/001.nsf

This course will explore modern theories and institutions of law, private property, the family and the state that emerged in the context of the British Empire. The course will emphasize the simultaneous development of, and relationship between, the legal institutions and practices elaborated for Britain and those developed for various colonial contexts.

Focused case studies of five historical debates will form the core of the course. We will begin by examining the major theories of private property, law, and the state that emerged in the West in the long eighteenth-century. This section will focus on theories of landed property that accompanied the formation of large landed estates in Britain and the expropriation of non-European lands in Australia and North America. We will then turn to British debates about property in persons and to colonial legal regimes regarding slavery, indentured labor, and "free" labor in the Caribbean. From there we will examine the formation of modern criminal law, comparing the modalities that developed in Britain and in India, and the theories of agency, evidence, and punishment that emerged in the two contexts. We also will consider the relationship between criminal and civil law in both contexts. Our fourth topic will address the treatment of religion and custom in Britain, Africa, and India, and the formation of systems of colonial religious and customary law. This will lead us to a more intensive study of the colonial and post-colonial state in India, focusing on legal institutions regarding gender, the family, religious and caste communities, violence, and civil society.

The course will involve close readings of both primary and secondary sources. Students will be required to write and submit a 1-2 page critical analysis of each week's readings, to lead two class discussions, each accompanied by a longer (4-6 page) review with annotated bibliography (these may be coordinated with a fellow student, depending on class size), and to write a final paper of 10-12 pages based on course readings.

Required readings will include:

  • Locke, Two Treatises of Government
  • Hegel, The Philosophy of Right (selections)
  • British Parliamentary Papers on slavery and indentured labor
  • Thomas Holt, The Problem of Freedom
  • Maine, The Ancient Law
  • Radhika Singha, A Despotism of Law

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HISTORY 304 / AMCULT 317. History of the Pacific Islands.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduces historical knowledge of the Pacific islands, focusing on the period 1769-1939. All major island groups are considered, with some emphasis on American territories in the Pacific. Thematic issues include indigenous systems of navigation and exchange, island cultures, imperialism, religion, commerce, island politics, and ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Department

HISTORY 312 / AMCULT 312. History of Latinos in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Meets with History 478.002.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTORY 377.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/312/001.nsf

See American Culture 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 318. Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Megan Koreman (piskie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Europe spent the first half of the twentieth century convulsed in the violence of war and revolution. The First World War hadn't even ended before the Bolshevik Revolution and its civil war began, followed by the street fighting between Fascists and Communists popular in the '20s and '30s, then the Spanish Civil War, the state violence of Nazism and Stalinism, and then the catastrophe of the Second World War. How and why did Europe descend into such violence? What role did technology play in it? How did ideology contribute? How did ordinary men and women make sense of it all, let alone survive it?

HISTORY 318 will explore the ideological, political, economic, social and cultural forces that collided in this turbulent era with particular attention to how World Wars I and II affected everyday life, Nazism, and the Bolshevik Revolution and Stalinism.

Grades will be based on two short papers, a midterm, a final and participation in discussion sections.

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HISTORY 320. Britain, 1901-1939: Culture and Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria through the Second World War, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state; the First World War and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subjects; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist governments in Europe; and the experience of the Blitz and World War II. Students will be asked to think critically about the various means by which national and personal stories are constituted, repressed, re-imagined, and deployed in debates about the meaning and uses of the past. Readings and other course materials will include autobiographies, novels, films, and photographs, and class sessions will include extensive discussion. No previous knowledge of British history will be assumed or required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 332 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / POLSCI 395 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rees/395/001.nsf

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 347(476) / ANTHRCUL 346. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Meets with History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/347/001.nsf

This course will examine the colonial period in Latin American history from the initial Spanish and Portuguese contact and conquest to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. It will focus on the interaction between Indians and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of colonial societies in the New World, and examining the indigenous background conquest as well as the nature of the settler community. We look at the shifting uses of land and labor, and the development of urban life. We use court records, Inquisition documents, and poetry to try to understand daily life for men and women, and the structures of honor and belief that shaped their worlds.

Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final.

Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 350 / GTBOOKS 350 / AMCULT 360. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 355 / CAAS 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider health and illness, medicine, and disease in diverse African worlds from the fifteenth century to the present. Designed equally for concentrators in History and Afroamerican and African Studies and students planning careers in the health professions in this country and abroad. No prior knowledge of Africa is assumed. Though historical in nature, the course will draw on the methodologies of medical anthropology, epidemiology, and medical sociology. It will propose health and wealth as a central theme to the history of Africans in diverse social and historical contexts, both on the African continent and in the larger Black Atlantic world. The central question will be: what happened to these deeply rooted forms of moral logic and therapeutic practice as Africans encountered new forms of wealth, inequality, and disease and new medical and healing systems associated with slave trades, colonialisms, epidemics, famines, debt and theft from the fifteenth century to the present?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 358(393). Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Histories of the Modern Caribbean. Meets with CAAS 358.008.

Instructor(s): Richard Turits

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/358/001.nsf

Situated at the historical crossroads of Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The region's past illuminates many of the central contradictions of modern history: slavery and freedom, colonialism and independence, racial hierarchy and political equality, despotism and revolution, nationalism and transnationalism, and migration and creolization. This course will treat these themes that cut across the various empires, nations, and cultures that have shaped the region. The course is not designed to provide a complete survey of the dozens of nations composing the Caribbean. Rather, focusing on the Greater Antilles — on Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba — we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian revolution to the present.

Course work includes intensive class discussion, debate, and analysis of historical scholarship, documents, literature, and film. There will be no final exam or paper. Instead, the course requires extensive weekly reading (~150 pp. — or more for literature) and a 2-3 pp. essay most weeks based on the assigned texts.

Possible readings include: The Black Jacobins; Biography of a Runaway Slave; The Problem of Freedom; Insurgent Cuba; Puerto Rican Jam; The U.S. Occupation of Haiti; Farming of Bones; In the Time of the Butterflies.

Films may include: Life and Debt; The Last Supper; Aimé Césaire II; The Operation; Strawberry and Chocolate; My American Girls.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 364. Culture and Politics of American Suburbia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In post-1945 U.S. history, suburbia has emerged as the dominant method of social organization, the primary focus of land-use planning, and the center of political power. Critics have blamed American suburbs for the crisis of the cities, the alienation of youth generations, the explosion of sprawl, and pervasive patterns of racial and class segregation. Defenders have praised the suburbs for the safety of their neighborhoods, the quality of their schools, and the broad expansion of the middle-class American Dream of a detached, single-family home. This course will grapple with the dominant themes and legacies of American suburbia through a focus on popular culture imagery; social and political history; race, class, gender, and generational analysis; and spatial/developmental policy.

  • Did the same forces that produced the sprawling suburbs also create the urban crisis?
  • How does a metropolitan approach to modern American history recast discussions about the rise and fall of the New Deal Order, the power shift from Rustbelt to Sunbelt, the changing ideologies of class and race, the politics of family and community, and the relationship between local and national policy?
  • How can the increasing diversity and dynamism of American suburbs be reconciled with the pervasive stereotypes of architectural blandness and cultural conformity?
  • What does it mean to say that the United States has become a Suburban Nation.

Lecture themes and discussion topics will range from Levittown to Columbine, from the Feminine Mystique to middle-class Black suburbs, from the Silent Majority to the anti-sprawl movement. The course will begin by confronting the dominant discourses of suburbia in American politics and popular culture, and throughout we will focus extensively on films, novels, and other mass media sources as key shapers of suburban identity. Close attention will be paid to the periodic battles over inclusion and exclusion in suburban communities, including political conflicts over school integration, housing desegregation, and taxation. Throughout the term, we will examine the changing meaning of the suburban label, as middle-class bedroom communities have evolved into autonomous horizontal cities no longer dependent on the urban core.

Students are expected to attend lectures and discussion sections, to watch assigned films/documentaries, and to consult the course webpage for the electronic course pack and graded assignments. The list below contains likely assigned books, but is subject to change.

Required Readings:

  • Kenneth Jackson, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of America
  • Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road
  • Bret Easton Ellis, Less tha Zero
  • David L. Kirp, Our Town: Race, Housing, and the Soul of Suburbia
  • Alan Wolfe, One Nation, After All: Middle Class Americans Really Think
  • Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles
  • Sarah Grace McCandless, Grosse Pointe Girl
  • Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Andres Duany, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 367 / AMCULT 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory E Dowd (dowdg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/amcult/367/001.nsf

See American Culture 367.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 368 / AMCULT 342 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 370 / WOMENSTD 370. Women in American History to 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the history of American women — as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes, and racial, regional, and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early seventeenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African-Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 373 / AMCULT 373. History of the U.S. West.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/373/001.nsf

This is a one-term course which examines the History of the American West from before European contact through the Cold War. Because of the long time period, there will be an emphasis on the themes and patterns that have shaped the American West. Topics will include Native American societies, European contact, settlement, and environmental impact. We will pay particular attention to issues surrounding ethnicity, gender, class, and labor. No previous knowledge is required, but a general background in American history will be helpful. There will also be an emphasis on reading and analyzing primary documents.

Required books found at Shaman Drum:

  • White, Richard, It's Your Misfortune and None of Mine Own, ISBN ? (University of Oklahoma)
  • Milner, Clyde, ed., Major Problems in the History of the American West, ISBN 0-669-41580-4 (Houghton-Mifflin)
  • Schlissel, Lillian, ed., The Western Women's Reader, ISBN 0-06-095337-3 (Harper-Perennial)
  • Deverell, William, ed., The West in the History of the Nation, vol. 1, ISBN 0-312-19171-5 (Bedford/St. Martin's)
  • Deverell, William, ed., The West in the History of the Nation, vol.2, ISBN 0-312-19211-8 (Bedford, St. Martin's)

The following book is recommended but not required:

  • Lamar, Howard R., ed., The Readers Encyclopedia of the American West, (Yale, 1999)

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HISTORY 381 / MEMS 381. History of the Jews from the Muslim Conquests to the Spanish Expulsion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/381/001.nsf

Jews did not leap from the land of the Bible to the shtetls of Eastern Europe. This course on medieval Jewish history (c. 400-c.1492) takes us to Iraq (geonic "Babylonia") and Palestine where the Talmuds were written; to Northern Africa and Spain where Jewish communities produced scholars such as Maimonides and Nahmanides, philosophy, poetry, rabbinic law and religious polemic; to the rise of Jewish communities in medieval France, England, Germany and Italy from the time of Charlemagne, through the first crusades, and until the expulsion of the Jews from most of Europe by the time of the Black Death. We will compare the status of the Jewish minority in the Muslim world and in the Christian world, and we will come away with a deeper awareness of "power", the relationship between religion, the economy, and politics. Special topics include medieval Jewish art (illuminated manuscripts); medieval Jewish marriage and sexuality; and the development of Christian anti-Jewish stereotypes and myths of violence.

Requirements for the course: Short papers, tests, and a final essay exam or research project.

Prerequisites: None. This course is intended for students with some experience studying history. HISTORY 110 or 211, AAPTI 100, and some familiarity with Judaism or Jewish civilization (RELIGION 201, JUDAIC 205 or similar)is recommended.

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HISTORY 385. History of Zionism and the State of Israel.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers the rise of Jewish nationalism from its origins in the late- nineteenth century through the creation of the State of Israel in 1948 and the history of the Jewish state in the following half-century. Emphasis will be placed on the political context out of which Zionism developed and on the larger cultural trends that shaped the variety of ideologies within the Zionist movement. Significant time will also be devoted to examining the role of Zionist activity within the histories of major Jewish communities in the Diaspora prior to World War II and the competing ideologies and movements (socialism, strict orthodoxy, and assimilationism) that challenged the Zionist solution to the "Jewish Question." The tragic confrontation between Jews and Arabs within the Land of Israel will be explored in some depth, with particular attention being paid to the genesis of the confrontation. The last cluster of lectures will focus on the cultural, social, and political problems that have beset the State of Israel from its establishment in 1948 to the present and on the links between these and broader themes in modern Jewish history as a whole. There will be a midterm examination, a ten-page analytical paper, and a comprehensive final.

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HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — History of Islam in South Asia.

Instructor(s): Farina Mir

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/392/001.nsf

This is an introductory level course on the history of Muslim communities and institutions in South Asia. Its aim is to introduce students to the broad historical currents of the expansion of Islam in the Indian subcontinent, the nature of Muslim political authority, the interaction between religious communities, Islamic aesthetics and contributions to material culture, the varied engagements and reactions of Muslims to colonial rule, the partition of British India and the creation of Pakistan, and the contemporary concerns of South Asia's Muslims. The course will begin with an introduction to the Islamic religious tradition. The main emphasis of the course will be on the social, political, and cultural history of Islam in South Asia. This course will be divided between classes devoted to lectures and those devoted to discussion. I will expect the active engagement of course participants in class discussions. Course lectures and discussion will be supplemented with visual material, music, and movies where possible. This course does not assume any prior knowledge of South Asian or Islamic history.

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HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 — Partition: Stories of Violence and Identity in 20th-Century South Asia.

Instructor(s): Rachel Sturman (rsturman@umich.edu), Christi Ann Merrill

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1947, India achieved independence from British colonial rule, but freedom brought a devastating partition into two separate nations: India and Pakistan. 15 million fled across the newly-formed borders, and a million were killed. The violence and dislocation have shaped post-colonial identities in both nations, and continue to inform border disputes and communal conflicts a half-century later. This course brings together a literary scholar and a historian to discuss what it means for the survivors of partition and the succeeding generations to remember details of these traumatic experiences in fiction, film, and personal testimony, and how these memories continue to form ideas about history, nation, community, family, self.

Students will be expected to write an informal one-page reading response for each class, to participate actively in discussion, and to take a midterm and a final open book examination.

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HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 003 — Muslims in South Asia: 20th Century. Meets with History 592.001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Metcalf

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to review and analyze major themes and historiographical approaches in the scholarship on the Muslim population in the Indian sub-continent in the twentieth century. We will seek to lay bare the arguments of a wide range of writers, identifying their themes, explicit and implicit assumptions, the sources they use, and the rhetorical strategies they deploy to make their arguments.

This course is open to advanced undergraduates who have studied the history of South Asia or equivalent.

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HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 — PolitCult of U.S.Imperialism . Meets w/CAAS 358.007.

Instructor(s): Penny M von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 358.007.

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HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 003 — Black Leadership. Meets with CAAS 358.003.

Instructor(s): Gaines

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 358.003.

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HISTORY 394. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. A maximum of eight credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 — Death & Burial in Pre-Modern Europe.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the dynamic between a pagan sense of the sad finality of death and Christian celebration of death as birth into a better life. Through this end, we will compare the burial customs of pagans and Christians in late antiquity (mourning rituals, funerary practices, and commemoration of the dead). We will try to measure the ways in which a social need to mourn the dead transformed Christian religious practice and how, in the later middle ages and renaissance, the rejection of ancient mourning practices became a measure of civilization. Students will write a research paper based on original sources.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 — Politics of Cold War America.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 — The Dutch Republic in the Golden Age.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the seventeenth century, the northern provinces of the Netherlands achieved independence after an eighty-year-long struggle with Spain, established a republican government (one of only two in the world), came to dominate world trade, developed the first commercial capitalist economy, became the only European nation to practice religious toleration and fostered the burst of artistic genius that is commemorated in the phrase "the golden age." This course will look at aspects of the Dutch republic during this period of incredible political, economic, religious, and artistic creativity, addressing the problem of why the Dutch seem in retrospect to have been so precociously modern. A great deal of emphasis will be placed on painting and the graphic arts (works by artists such as Rembrandt, de Hooch, Steen, Vermeer, Dou, Brouwer, and van Ostade) and how they related to contemporary society.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 — WritingWomen:SAsianHist,Ethnog,Lit.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a methodological course that asks, "How are women written about?" We focus on the "writing" in (selected) approaches of History, Anthropology, and Fiction in their constructions of "women". We will use selected topics such as mothering, love, work, religion, education, nationalism, and consumption to approach the topic of writing about women.

The reading for the course will consist of some interesting examples from each genre on South Asia, and a packet of secondary readings reflecting on the same concerns as ours that are not restricted to South Asia.

This is a writing seminar. Students will be guided from the beginning in choosing a topic for research, pursuing sources, gathering data, making arguments, and writing and re-writing drafts. The aim is to produce a full-length quality paper on a topic of your choice incorporating the concerns of the class and showing mastery of the technique of writing a paper.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 — The Atlantic World, 1700-1834.

Instructor(s): Maya Jasanoff (jasanoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The eighteenth-century Atlantic world was a place of opportunity, violence, discovery, danger, and tragedy. Cultures mixed, often by force; fortunes were made and lost; and buccaneers, slaves, entrepreneurs, pilgrims, and settlers brought new societies, including our own, into being. This seminar will explore the links between Britain, North America, the Caribbean, and West Africa, during an age of transformation. Focusing on the topics of slavery, migration, and national identities, we will look at specific regions around the Atlantic and consider them in wider global context. How, for example, does an Atlantic perspective affect the way we think about American or British history? We will consider this and other questions using a range of materials: memoirs, maps, images, travel accounts, and scholarly histories. At a time when America's relations with Britain and Europe are under intense pressure, understanding our shared Atlantic history seems more relevant than ever.

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HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 006 — The American Presidency in the 1970s: Issues of the Ford Administration.

Instructor(s): Dennis Daellenbach

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on the dynamics of the American Presidency in the 1970s, and decisions and decision-making in the Gerald R. Ford Administration. Students will examine the people and the social, economic, and political issues that shaped the Ford Presidency. The "Seventies" was a pivotal decade in American history. Many Ford names are recognizable — Cheney, Rumsfeld, O'Neill, Greenspan, and others. And the issues also still echo today — energy crisis, tax cuts, a slow economy, the legacy and lessons of the Vietnam War, partisan politics, razor close elections, Executive Branch relations with Congress, Presidential leadership, bringing a nation together, and more.

The seminar will meet as a class for lecture/discussion during the first weeks of the academic term at the Gerald R. Ford Library on North Campus. Students will then meet individually with the instructor and staff of the Ford Library as they research and write a paper on a topic of their choice utilizing the original document resources of the Ford Library.

Evaluation will be based on discussion, oral presentations to the class, written reports on readings, and the major research paper. Objectives of the course are to explore and gain an understanding of the office of the President and Presidential decision making, to investigate how the White House functions and how it creates the documentary record, and to provide a valuable learning experience of conducting original research on writing a lengthy seminar paper.

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HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 — African-American Social Movements of the 20th Century. Meets with American Culture 496.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/amcult/496/001.nsf

This course will examine the collective efforts of African-Americans to overcome racial discrimination and legal segregation over the course of the 20th century. How were Black protest movements organized? Why did they succeed or fail to achieve their goals? What caused them to disintegrate? Specifically, we will compare the role that ideological, strategic, and contextual factors played in the success or failure of movements. We will also examine how Black social movements have made use of and generated African-American cultural practice. Finally, we will discuss how relations of race, class, and gender both within American society and within the African-American community were reflected in these movements.

The course will be conducted as a discussion seminar. Students will also be expected to keep a journal of responses to the course reading and will write research paper based on primary documents.

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HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 — Time and History.

Instructor(s): Thomas Trautmann (traut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ideas about the age of the earth and the human race, the nature of time, and the beginning and destiny of human history have varied greatly at different periods and across cultures. This course studies these ideas comparatively. Topics will include: the cultures of time in the Biblical religions and in Hinduism and Buddhism; the anthropology of time; science and the Time Revolution of the 1860s. There will be class discussions of readings, and each participant will write and present a research paper.

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HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students, HISTORY 398, and senior standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HISTORY 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

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HISTORY 405 / CLCIV 476 / RELIGION 476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clciv/476/001.nsf

See Classical Civilization 476.001.

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HISTORY 408. Byzantine Empire, 284-867.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A lecture course which provides a survey of the history of the later Roman Empire from the reforms of Diocletian that paved the way out of the crisis of the third century, through Constantine's move east and the conversion to Christianity (entering the Byzantine period), Justinian, Heraclius on through the Amorion Dynasty which came to a close with the murder of Michael the Sot in 867. The course will stress political history, giving considerable attention as well to religious history (conversion to Christianity, the great theological disputes over the relationship between God the Father and the Son as well as the relationship between the human and divine natures in Christ culminating in the Church councils of Nicea and Chalcedon, the rise of monasticism and Iconoclasm), administrative reforms (Diocletian's and Constantine's reforms, the reforms of the seventh century culminating in the Theme system), demographic changes and foreign relations (Goths, the Slavic and Bulgar invasions, relations with the Bulgars, relations with the Persians and Arabs in the East and later with the Franks and Charlemagne). No background is assumed. Requirements: a midterm written hour-exam. One ten page paper and a final examination. Paper topics are tailored to individual interests.

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HISTORY 433. Russia Under the Tsars: From Peter the Great to the Revolutions of 1917.

Section 001 — St. Petersburg & Leningrad: City as History. Graduate students elect 433.005. Meets with History 433.005.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergrads taking this course receive 4 credits.

As part of the LS&A theme semester celebrating St. Petersburg, this course will examine the cultural, social, and political revolutions that created St. Petersburg in a desolate Baltic marshland, situated the city as the center of Russia's "Europeanization", and ultimately transformed it symbolically into Leningrad. Our focus will be on the contrasts between cultural glories and social deprivations, between the being "Western" and "Russian", and between reason and belief as influences on historical change. Throughout, the city itself, Peter the Great's "Window on the West", will serve itself as a window on the broader issues of gradual development and revolutionary change in Russia, a symbol of what both tsars and commissars wanted and expected Russia to be.

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HISTORY 440 / ACABS 413 / ANTHRARC 442. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Meets with ACABS 513.001. Graduate students elect ACABS 513.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/acabs/413/002.nsf

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 413.001.

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HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we explore the history of Japan from the transformation and decline of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th century to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will cover a number of major historical themes that emerge from these centuries of radical change: the deterioration of official forms of control during the latter part of the Tokugawa era (1600-1867) and the rise of new commoner social and cultural spheres; Japan's entry into a world market in the mid-19th century and the establishment of the modern Japanese nation-state; industrial modernization and its social effects; the changing status of women; new forms of social protest and mass culture in the early 20th century; the rise of Japanese imperialism in Asia; the Pacific Asian War and its aftermath; the U.S. Occupation and postwar recovery; "high-growth economics" and its social-environmental costs; culture and political economy in "post-industrial" Japan. The course focuses on the diversity of historical experiences as well as the conflicts that have shaped the history of modern Japan.

Class sessions combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual presentation.

Course pack available at Dollar Bill

Required texts are available at Shaman Drum.

  • Peter Duus, Modern Japan
  • Fukuzawa Yukichi, An Autobiography of Fukuzawa Yukichi
  • Natsume Soseki, And Then
  • Yoshimoto Banana, Kitchen

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HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — 1770-1942.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) — a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 454. The Formation of Indian Civilization to 320 A.D.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the beginnings of Indian civilization, from about 2500 BC when it first appeared in the Indus valley to the start of the Gupta empire in which it reaches its classic form. It is a lecture survey, which will deal with all aspects of Indian civilization in its formative phase. It presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. (The subsequent history of classical India and the coming of Islam will be dealt with in HISTORY 455, to be offered next term, but each course is self-contained and you need not elect the other.)

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HISTORY 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Peoples of Early America.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended though not required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/460/001.nsf

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

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HISTORY 469. Precolonial Southeast Asia.

Section 001 — Meets with History 667.001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examines the history of Southeast Asia from the early first millennium to the early 19th century. It covers both mainland and island Southeast Asia and explores the interconnection between political, institutional, cultural, and economic developments.

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HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — The Colonial Order of Things in SE Asia. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.001.

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HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Lewis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lhc/412/001.nsf

This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

Course pack. No text. Must have Junior or Senior standing.

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HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 — Latinos in the U.S. Meets with History 312.001.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 483(532). St. Petersburg and the Russian Empire in the 18th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Developed in conjunction with the St. Petersburg Theme Semester, this course will examine the first century of Imperial Russian history, a period riven with the contradictions of enlightened, Westernizing rulers who ruled over an increasingly oppressed population of serfs and conquered peoples. The history of eighteenth century Russia has been dominated to the exclusion of almost all other subjects by two striking figures: Peter the Great at the beginning, and Catherine the Great at the end. These two powerful rulers attempted to transform Russia from above and left indelible marks of their colorful personalities on the building of their marvelous northern capital and on the development of their country. Recent innovations in historical study have introduced new approaches to this understudied century, so that we now can add to the conventional biographies of the two great leaders with new studies of the society and culture that greeted their innovations, sometimes with enthusiasm and sometimes with suspicion.

In this course, we will combine a variety of approaches, reading monographs, scholarly articles, contemporary memoirs, and literary works of the time to try to understand the complicated dynamics of an era of cultural flowering and enlightenment in a society still characterized by serfdom and a nobility bound in service. We will pay particular attention to the art, architecture, and urban geography of St. Petersburg, the glistening new city built in a northern swamp by order of Peter the Great, transformed into the jewel of the north by the deliberate plan of its succession of monarchs.

We will be able to take advantage of a number of the special events — exhibitions, concerts, performances, and lectures — coming to campus in connection with the 300th anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enjoy these special events with a background of knowledge of the period.

The course is open to all, but is designed for upper-division undergraduates and for graduate students. The format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, and lectures will frequently be illustrated with slides. There are no prerequisites.

REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
  2. Attendance at some of the special events scheduled outside of class-time (to be arranged).
  3. midterm exam
  4. 7-8 page paper on a primary source
  5. Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 487 / ENGLISH 416 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/416/001.nsf

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Department

HISTORY 541 / AAPTIS 467 / RELIGION 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 467.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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