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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 6:50 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


HISTART 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from HISTART 101 to HISTART 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (HISTART 101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (HISTART 103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 101. Art and Agency in a Pre-Modern World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This wide-ranging course offers an excellent introduction to the study of the History of Art, providing a strong foundation for further work in more advanced courses. Lectures focus on major works of art and architecture from the ancient world (Egyptian, Ancient Near Eastern, Greek, Roman) and the Middle Ages (Early Medieval, Islamic, Romanesque, Gothic) and seek to reveal the specific historical contexts in which the monuments were produced and the particular religious and social functions they served. Students develop a vocabulary for the description and analysis of works of art and a basic understanding of the methods and aims of art historical study. Lectures are supplemented by weekly discussion sections held in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology in which students study works of art in detail and discuss readings drawn from a general art historical survey and a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 108 / CAAS 108. Introduction to African Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Doris

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/histart/108/001.nsf

This course is a one-term introductory survey of the arts of Africa. Sculpture, pottery, textiles, architecture, body adornment, and performance will be examined and discussed on the basis of aesthetic, religious, political, and social contexts. Although the main emphasis of the course will be on "traditional art," we will discuss many changes and continuities within African artistic traditions as evidenced in late twentieth-century African art. The course is arranged geographically from western through central to eastern and southern Africa, and will conclude across the Atlantic Ocean with a brief investigation of African visual traditions in the Caribbean and the Americas. Weekly discussion sections, movies and videos, and museum visits will complement the lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 — Artemisia Gentileschi — Woman Painter in 17th-Century Italy and the Art of Art History.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Easily one of the most memorable creative personalities of the Baroque, and arguably the most powerfully expressive and influential woman painter ever, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1652) has become the central figure in the long overdue recovery of the history of art produced by women. With Artemisia's pictorially aggressive and emotionally compelling pictures providing the focus, this limited-enrollment course proposes to stand as a case study of how historians of art operate in attempting to understand works of art within the complex socio-cultural and personal contexts in which they were produced. Formal analysis, iconography, patronage, feminism, and psychoanalysis will be among the many areas of inquiry. Original works of art, the eye of the investigator, primary source material, and scientific data will be among the tools, as through a combination of assigned readings, brief written reports, discussion, and a final course paper students will sharpen their visual sensitivity, their ability to think critically and to recognize quality in art, their awareness of diversity, their communication skills, and in all their appreciation of her demands and rewards of intellectual inquiry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 — Sex, Politics, and Visuality in Chinese Cinema.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces and interprets Chinese cinema by focusing on three themes: "the color of sex, violence and revolution (Red Series);" "the symbol of women (Water Series);" and "the dream of a strong China (Modernity Series)." Varying methods of cinematic analysis will be introduced with case studies. The goal is to explore the issues of gender, politics, and visuality in Chinese films and society. Requirement: weekly readings, class participation, multiple writing assignments, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 221 / CLARCH 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clarch/221/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 250 / MEMS 250. Italian Renaissance Art, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the works of Giotto, Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Piero della Francesca come to be regarded as so important in the history of western art? Why, even within the artists' lifetimes, was their art regarded as signaling a "rebirth" of painting and sculpture? This course aims at an understanding of early Renaissance art by seeing it in relation to broader transformations in the culture of the Italian city-states in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The city will be viewed as the site of divergent uses of art by different communities and interests. Images were employed in the expression of identity and status, as a strategic means of producing consensus or exploiting social division, and in an appeal for sacred mediation on behalf of the living and the dead. We will study different genres of visual representation (the altarpiece, mural painting, public sculpture) and the different social spaces where art was displayed (civic buildings, piazze, religious institutions, the domestic environment). Works of art will be considered as modes of argument and as points of interaction among networks of clients, artists, social groups and institutions (guilds, family associations, courts, confraternities), and figures of authority (popes, rulers, citizens, abbots and abbesses).

From this multiplicity of uses and responses emerged highly varied conceptions of the nature of the image and the role of the artist, which, in turn, influenced artistic performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 271. Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, State-sponsored form of Classicism through a sequence of developments that threw these norms into question and saw the emergence of a modern art market. We explore the politically charged Classicism of the early years of the nineteenth century, Romanticism and its increasingly conflicted relationship with official Classicism, mid-nineteenth century Realism, and a succession of late nineteenth century avant-garde initiatives from Impressionism to Neo-Impressionism. These episodes played out the deep seated contradictions that were emerging in modern society. We consider the different forms taken by opposition to established cultural values, as well as the new and hotly contested approaches to the representation of modern life. The nineteenth century is the period during which modern art developed its characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns: an insistence on innovation, originality and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a strained and conflict-ridden relationship to changing forms of political power. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of the nature and status of the visual image, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting, as well as of new forms of printed media and photography. The course is designed to encourage close readings of images (by David, Ingres, Delacroix, Géricault, Daumier, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Seurat, et al.) within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 285 / AAPTIS 285. Introduction to the Art and Architecture of the Islamic World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys Islamic art and architecture from Spain to India and from the advent of Islam in the 7th century to the rise of Colonialism. What were the processes through which this new venture gave shape to particular Islamic idioms? Architecture (mosques, mausoleums, palaces, garden ensembles and urban environments), the luxury objects of utility (ceramics, metalwork, glass, textiles, etc.), painting and the arts of the book will be explored as manifestations and visual representations of the production of Islam, enunciating its spiritual and intellectual values, and the socioeconomic parameters that contributed to the formation and development of its distinctive cultural system. Special attention will be given to the interaction between the new faith and pre-Islamic traditions of the conquered through the dynamic interplay between indigenous and Qur'anic cultures. The problematics in interpreting vastly diverse cultural systems as an unchanging, monolithic phenomenon will be emphasized. Interactive class discussions relating the visual with the discursive, a midterm, a final exam, small written assignments on museum objects, and museum visits are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 376. Dada and Surrealism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elmer Simon

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Unlike other art movements in the twentieth century, Surrealism's engagement with the plastic arts lacked stylistic unity. The course will therefore begin by asking what makes a work of art Surrealist. The movement was initially defined by the principle of psychic automatism and the practice of automatic writing, and we will start by looking at the problems faced by Surrealist artists in the 1920s in translating these terms into a visual register. Later we will go on to assess the claim that painting in Surrealism came to be split between this visual form of automatism and the fixing of dream images, and examine the legacy of this division in the 1930s.

The course is divided into three parts, successively focusing on the aesthetic, political and ethical dimension of Surrealism.

  • Part one: `Psychic Automatism' (1919-1928) will focus on the definition of Surrealism in the first Manifesto and the initial attempts by the Surrealist painters to create a corresponding art practice.
  • Part two: `Dialectical Materialism' (1927-1933) will look at the period of movement's engagement with the French Communist Party, when the Surrealist artists turned away from automatism to create work based on the principle of collage.
  • Part three: `Convulsive Beauty' (1931-1939) will follow Surrealism's attempts to reconcile Marx and Freud in the face of the rise of fascism in Europe.

In the final two classes we will look at the circumstances of Surrealism's decline into an art movement between 1937 and 1947. Individual classes will focus on the key figures in Surrealism's artistic practice, including Giorgio de Chirico, Max Ernst, Joan Miró, André Masson, Man Ray, René Magritte, Salvador Dalí, Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti, Marcel Duchamp, Hans Bellmer, and Claude Cahun. Through this study of individual artists, we will address the movement's attempts in both practice and theory to formulate a new definition of the origin and function of the work of art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 382 / ACABS 382 / ANTHRARC 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Section 001 — Meets with ACABS 686.001.

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 — Contemporary Artists of Color in England.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course tracks the burst of cultural production by contemporary artists of color, trained and based in England from the 1950s to the present. The art under our scrutiny will be Modernist painting and sculpture, and post-Modernist mixed-media art, installations, performances, and film. We will also examine the furor generated by controversial exhibitions in which the work of artists of color was prominently featured, namely, "The Other Story" (London, 1989) and "Sensation" (Brooklyn, 1999). The semester's reading include art histories and criticism, as well as the social and intellectual texts that influenced these artists: cultural nationalism, postcolonial critiques, Franz Fanon, British cultural studies, and post-identity theories. Course will be conducted as combination of lecture and discussion. Requirements include exams, summaries of readings, research papers, and oral presentations. No pre-requisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 — Italian Renaissance Print Culture. Meets HA concentration/minor seminar requirement.

Instructor(s): Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this small seminar, we will study the material and visual culture of prints in Italy, circa 1450-1600, and the socio-historical context of print production and circulation. The introduction of printing with moveable type and new techniques of pictorial reproduction had an impact on culture and society that was comparable to that of the current computer and Internet technological revolution. Utilizing the excellent collection of intaglio prints in the University of Michigan Museum of Art and the early illustrated printed books in the Special Collections of the Harlan Hatcher Library, students will become familiar with a range of printing techniques (woodcut, engraving, etching, and dry-point) and the different categories and functions of prints. The rich variety of printed products executed in this period will be explored — from the work of accomplished masters like Marcantonio Raimondi, who reproduced compositions by Raphael, to hand-colored 'popular' religious prints that exhibit interesting pictorial strategies and graphic effects. We will consider theoretical arguments about the cultural significance of reproductive technology and the rise in visual literacy within different social populations and cultural spheres. We will move between the museum and the classroom, combining the careful study of the physical objects with investigations into the meaning of printed visual representation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 — The Art of Johannes Vermeer.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the work and world of Johannes Vermeer, one of the most admired and least prolific of seventeenth-century Dutch artists. The course will focus on the ways in which Vermeer's small corpus of pictures (roughly 34 paintings) looks at and comments on crucial aspects of Dutch painting. The questions of how and to what extent Vermeer can be considered a typical Dutch painter will be a focus of our investigations. Our aim will be to understand Vermeer's work in relation to the historical and cultural circumstances of artistic production in the Dutch Republic. Topics will include the making and marketing of Dutch art, the intersecting concerns of painting and optics, art and experimental inquiry, gender and genre painting, and recent technical and scientific studies of Vermeer's work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 397. Honors Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lay Howard (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTART 393. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course involves weekly meetings of each senior thesis writer with their faculty advisors and the Director of Undergraduate Studies (who oversees the seminar). Class time is divided between group meetings (of all parties) and individual tutorials (between students and their advisors). The seminar thus provides a weekly three-hour forum in which students and faculty discuss a wide range of issues having to do with research techniques, methodological problems, and writing skills. It also encourages exchange and cooperation among thesis-writers as they take on the challenges of an extended research project.

This course is the first of a two-course sequence in the senior year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 424 / CLARCH 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 424.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 431 / AMCULT 433. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century" played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This course will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 443 / CLARCH 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 443.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 462. Baroque Art in Italy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102 or 260. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course pretends to identify the most historically significant, intellectually stimulating, and moving achievements in the development of Italian Baroque painting, from the late-16th C. stirrings of a new way of seeing and working to the spectacular ceiling frescoes of the late 17th C. Following a detailed syllabus, it focuses on such artists as Caravaggio, Annibale Carracci, Artemisia Gentileschi, Guido Reni, Guercino, and Pietro da Cortona, and upon the cities of Rome, Bologna, and Naples. The art — religious subject matter, history, mythology, portraits, landscapes, genre, and still-life — will be studied for what it reveals of individual creative genius, of socio/political/religious aspirations, and of shared features which together might be said to constitute a concept of the Baroque. Students with formal training in the history of art (HISTART 102 or HISTART 260, for example) and with an enthusiastic desire to become involved with the visual material and the literature of the field (a course pack will be provided) are most welcome. Evaluation will be by way of two exams (midterm and final) and a short museum paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 — Art and Archaeology along the Silk Road. Fulfills HA concentration/minor seminar requirement. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The floating of merchandise and ideas between Chang'an and Rome in the first millennium left us not only a romantic memory about ancient travelers but also abundant treasures buried along the so-called Silk Road connecting the East and the West. Explorers and archaeologists from Europe, America, and Japan made astonishing discoveries of ancient artifacts and ruined cities in the Gobi deserts in central Asia in the early 20th century. Motivated by political, economic, and cultural purposes, these archaeological discoveries provide us with important references on the art and culture of the people who once lived and traveled along the route. The transfer of the artifacts from their original locations to the native countries of the archaeologists also illuminates the issues of colonialism, nationalism, and cultural politics. This course examines the major archaeological finds along the Silk Road in the 20th century and interprets the social-political-cultural implications of archaeology in a modern context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 — Art in Russia and Imperial Patronage, 1703-1917. Meets September 16 - November 11. [2 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=September 24).

Instructor(s): Alexander Potts (adpotts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

mini/short

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be team-taught by two visiting curators/art historians from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg and will feature European painting, drawing, furniture, porcelain, silver, and textiles that are part of the Fall 2003 Hermitage exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Students will be expected to attend Boris Godunov, which is being performed at U-M from October 29-November 2.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 536 / CLARCH 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sculptures in marble, bronze, and other media played a major role in the construction and presentation of elite and non-elite self-images, ideologies and aspirations in the Hellenistic and Roman world. Sculptors drew upon a variety of by then traditional classical and non-classical artistic forms to create new and often original works for rulers and their regimes, for wealthy private citizens, and for those of lesser means. Lectures and class discussions will focus on political and social uses of sculptural images from the late 4th century BC to the 4th century AD but will emphasize the Roman era. Topics will include (among others): the role of sculpture in negotiations of individual, class, gender, and ethnic identities; iconographies of power; the phenomena of artistic appropriation, imitation and emulation; Roman concepts of decorum, aesthetics and visuality; the collecting and reuse of older sculptures (both in antiquity and in modern times); the structure of the sculpture "industry;" and technical as well as formal developments in Hellenistic and Roman sculpture. Lectures will be based primarily on slides, but the class will examine original sculptures whenever possible. There will be a midterm and final. An object-based project at the Kelsey Museum will require a short paper (approx. 4 pages) within the first three weeks of the term. A second paper based on research will be due four weeks after the midterm. Graduate students will write a 15-page research paper. Undergraduates will write a shorter paper (5-7 pages), which may be based on an object in a local collection. Foreign languages are not required for undergraduates, but it is expected that graduate students will use foreign language sources (e.g., German, French and/or Italian) in their research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 555. Renaissance Architecture in Italy.

Section 001 — Meets with Architecture 518.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/arch/518/001.nsf

The course examines the architecture of the Renaissance; the buildings and cities of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy, France and England. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Renaissance, including philosophical, religious, political, economic and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 580. Twentieth-Century Masters.

Section 001 — Romare Bearden.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102, 272. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Painter and collage artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988) worked in social realist, figural abstract, non-objective styles, and in a variety of media. The first third of Bearden's career (1930-1950) was modestly successful, the second (1960-1988) generated solid praise for his black genre representations, interpretations of myth and folklore, and avant-garde practice. Posthumously, a third phase shall commence in September 2003 when the National Gallery of Art opens a major Bearden retrospective. This exhibition will be an unprecedented event in the history of an institution that has infrequently honored modernists, and even more rarely, African-American artists of any period. Our class will visit the Washington, D.C. display for it marks a significant revisionist moment. Bearden, already a "black master" (along with Henry Ossawa Tanner, William H. Johnson, Archibald J. Motley, and Jacob Lawrence), will likely join the American modernist pantheon of Pollock, de Kooning, Johns, and Rauschenberg. What brings the conferral of mastery to an artist's enterprise? Bearden's production and its reception shall be the case study in our consideration of canons and their authority. Course shall be conducted as combination of lecture and discussion. Requirements include research papers, summaries, exams, and oral presentation. There are no prerequisites, but students who have previous art history course work will reap the greatest benefits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


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