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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in College Honors


This page was created at 7:18 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

HONORS 135 is a mini-course intended for first-year Honors students. All sections are taught by Honors seniors, and are intended to introduce students who are just beginning their academic careers to the vast array of academic possibilities in the College and the University. Honors seniors, in collaboration with the Honors Program, will guide first-year students on a journey which will open their eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. All sections will be motivated by one common question: "Why does it matter?" The seniors who lead the courses have worked their way through preliminary courses and College requirements and have arrived, as Honors concentrators, at a point where they are conducting original research and writing Honors theses. Thus they can share their enthusiasm and experience with their students and mentor their progress in small seminar-style discussions.

Please note: HONORS 135 does not count towards the 8 courses a student needs for the Sophomore Honors Award. Honors courses must have three or more credits. These courses are available to first-year Honors students ONLY.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 001 — Beyond Ophelia: Exploring Gender and Education.

Instructor(s): Clair Morrissey

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/135/001.nsf

This course will serve as a survey of issues related to gender and education. We will focus primarily on the areas of higher education and middle school. Planned topics for discussion include: bias in testing and course-taking patterns, the intersections of identities, Title IX and affirmative action, academic freedom and sexual harassment. Emphasis will be placed on dialogue, as well as the exploration of themes with an eye to social change and the similarities of sexism, racism, classism and homophobia. Credit will be based on the weekly preparation of questions for discussion and participation in a final group "activism project."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 002 — Leadership and Politics.

Instructor(s): Sumon Dantiki

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/135/002.nsf

The label "leader" gets bantered about quite a bit in contemporary American society. It is used to describe everyone from star athletes to dotcom CEOs. This course, however, aims to examine the idea of leadership within the vital arena of politics. During the course, we will consider two main questions: what defines good leadership? How do we recognize and cultivate it?

To this end, the course will have three parts.

  1. Firstly, we will look at political leadership from an individual viewpoint. Who do we consider great American political leaders of the past and why?
  2. Secondly, we will look at leadership from a national level. What should define America's leadership role in the world?
  3. Finally, we will come to the most important question of all: how do we make ourselves better leaders?

Students should expect light reading and plenty of discussion during the course. The only prerequisites are genuine interest and a good sense of humor. Feel free to email Sumon Dantiki at sdantiki@umich.edu with any questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 003 — Medicine from All Angles.

Instructor(s): Mitesh Patel

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give students an idea of ways that they can get involved in medicine through multiple areas of study. Topics to be covered will include the impact of scientific research, economics, mathematics, language and communication, physics, and psychology on the field of medicine. The first week will be an introduction to the class as well as an introduction to each of the six topics to be discussed throughout the rest of the term. Students will be asked to give their suggestions as to what they would like to learn from each topic. The topics may be adjusted to fit the interests of the students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 004 — Investigations in Poetry .

Instructor(s): Zach Caple

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Global village" is new terminology and implies an elasticity of what can be considered local. In such an immense locality, we depend on prosthetics of television, spectroscopes, and secondhand knowledge to supply us with pictures that our senses cannot. As this is a course in poetry, we will be specifically committed to the meaningful picture and will therefore place focus on the imagination as the tool of insight.

The course is divided into two tracks each with its own readings and poetry writing assignments. Both tracks will be taught simultaneously and are intended to compliment the other. Those electing track one, The Elasticity of the Local, will read Glare by A.R. Ammons and will investigate questions of domain. Those electing track two, Figments and Perception, will read Diane Ackerman's A Natural History of the Senses and investigate questions immediate to perception and imagination. Engaging both parts of the class will not be requisite, though bilateral attention is encouraged and, in truth, cannot be inhibited.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 005 — Great Women in Great Books.

Instructor(s): Johanna Hanink

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/135/005.nsf

The classics of Greek literature (excepting Sappho's poems) may have been composed entirely by men, but those male authors created some of the world's most vibrant, complex, and memorable fictional women. In this course, we will examine these female characters in depth, specifically relying on secondary sources (literary and visual) in order to investigate how different cultural imaginations have recreated and refashioned their literary legacies.

This course will loosely follow the chronological order of the Great Books 191 syllabus. Each week, we will explore how the images of one, two, or a few female figures of classical literature have been reinvented and reimagined, in periods ranging from later classical antiquity itself to our own time in the 21st Century. We will use Sappho as a launching point to begin our study of the female characters introduced by the Great Books curriculum — Helen, Andromache, Penelope, the Homeric immortals, Antigone, Clytemnestra, Lysistrata, Medea, and the Bacchae.

Course requirements will consist of contributions to a group e-mail list and a five page academic or creative writing project to be turned in on the last day of class. Reading requirements will be gentle; they will include short excerpts from later literature and light secondary material. Required text: Ovid's Heroides, trans. Harold Isbell, publ. Penguin. (Students of Latin interested in reading selections of the Heroides in the original will find me delighted to accommodate.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 006 — Performance and Social Identity or Not Your Mother's Theater Class.

Instructor(s): Brian Lobel

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/135/006.nsf

The world of theater is as diverse as the ideas and the people that write and perform it. In this seven-week seminar, we will explore solo performance pieces, plays, and movies which address issues of social concern. At times inappropriate, at times irreverent, these pieces are always controversial and, hopefully, insightful. The work of playwrights OyamO and Rebecca Gilman; performance artists Anna Deveare Smith and Holly Hughes; comics Margaret Cho and Lenny Bruce and work from the emerging Slam Poetry movement are examples of what we will be discussing. The goal of this course is to begin to identify where social identity and performance converge, as well as to introduce first-year students to Ann Arbor's unique theater scene.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — Introduction to Historical Research.

Instructor(s): Shaw Livermore Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Understanding of the past necessarily rests upon the study and assessment of a great variety of records. These range from archaeological finds, official government documents, newspapers, diaries, letters to rare books. Historians depend heavily upon the fact that such materials have been collected and preserved by museums, archives, and even families. Here at Michigan are two well-known repositories of historical materials, one the Bentley Library on North Campus, and the other the Clements Library on South University Avenue. The first collects primarily those source materials that relate to Michigan history, and the second collects primarily materials pertaining to the discovery and early settlement of North America. Early in the academic term we shall visit each library to see something of the range and texture of their holdings. Then, each student will carve out a modest historical problem or issue that can be addressed from these sources during the remainder of the term. Then the task will be to examine pertinent manuscript collections, take suitable notes, and put together an original work of history. Again, the scope must necessarily be limited by materials available and the time available to complete it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 — Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.

Instructor(s): Frank Whitehouse Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Guest lecturers will share insights into critical thinking and problem solving in their own academic and professional specialties. Students will prepare two term papers — the first on critical thinking and problem solving, and the second on an article appearing in the Skeptical Inquirer. Students will present a formal critique of one of these two papers. The section does not satisfy a writing requirement. Students will bring to class current written accounts of news which illustrate flawed critical thinking for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 003 — The Nature of Intelligence.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All animals display intelligent behavior. However, it can be argued that no other animal possesses the intellectual might of humans. This all depends, though, on what we mean by "intelligence." Definitions of intelligence vary widely, for example, depending on the conceptions held by laypeople or experts, the theories used to describe the structure or function of intelligence, or the manner in which intelligence allows people to adapt to their environments. In this course we will survey the major approaches to defining intelligence in an attempt to come to grips with its nature. A second goal of the course is to qualify if not dispense with narrow and often culturally biased definitions of intelligence that assume intelligence is reflected only in academic performance and what "Intelligence" tests measure. Students who sign up for this course are expected to have no special background in psychology but are expected to be inquisitive and willing to actively discuss the concept of intelligence. The readings for the course will be a combination of scientific articles, book chapters, and popular readings on the subject matter. The course is seminar format with the expectation that students will participate actively and on occasion help to lead discussion. At times, part of each class session will be devoted to performing class activities to reinforce concepts from class. Student evaluation will be based on mini exams, execution of discussion topic, and general participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 251. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — Imagination.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/251/001.nsf

The Romantics made major claims for imagination: that it was both an artistic and cognitive faculty. Thus the seminar will begin by considering both the structure of the Romantic literary imagination and the romantic theory of knowledge in works by Wordsworth, Blake, Coleridge, Kant, and Fichte. Attention will then shift to more general questions: Does artistic imagination tell us anything about reality? Can imagination become a rigorous mode of cognition? What is its relationship to rationality? Does some form of imagination have a place in science and ethics? The nature of metaphorical thinking will be considered, as will the function of imagination in scientific revolutions, the psychology of perception, and visual art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — History of Medicine and the Art of Humbug.

Instructor(s): Richard L Malvin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Honors seminar centers upon the evolution of modern medicine, including early Western medical concepts and the introduction of scientific method. In addition, attention will be directed at current fads; acupuncture, ESP, astral projections, chiropractic, diets, etc. Students are required to read one book from the suggested reading list that is provided on the first day of class and write two papers, a short paper at midterm and a 5-6 page paper at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 — Plate Tectonics.

Instructor(s): Josep M Pares (jmpares@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/honors/252/002.nsf

The theory of Plate Tectonics states that the Earth's outermost layer is fragmented into a dozen or more large and small plates that are moving relative to one another as they ride atop hotter, more mobile material. The theory developed from the hypothesis that continents on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean had drifted apart (‘Continental rifting'). Fossil Earth's magnetic field in rocks, volcanoes and earthquakes provide the evidence. Development of the theory allows to better understanding mountain building, distribution of fossil remains, the origin of features on the ocean floor, and much more. The course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth Science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics and written essays on the same subject.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 290. Honors Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 370. Junior Seminar on Research Methods.

Section 001 — Rhetoric of Evidence in Research. This class meets at 1547 Washtenaw Ave. [2-3 credits].

Instructor(s): Fred L Bookstein (flb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upperclass course deals with inference from evidence across all of the arts and sciences, from physics through the humanities. We emphasize commonalties across disparate disciplines in the rhetorical tactics by which evidence is used: modes such as preponderance-of-evidence arguments, statistical inference, graphics, experiments, or abduction. Over the course of the seminar, the seminar will consider ten arguments at book length, discussing many different aspects of their rhetorical strategies. One critique might question the target article's exclusion of plausible alternatives, for instance, or anomalies not pursued, or ambiguities remaining; another might inquire as to the origin of the disciplinary community's a priori agreement that certain questions of this sort need not have been raised in the main text. In past years, the tenor of these sessions has corresponded to that of a strenuous doctoral defense, but the outcome is rarely so predictable.

Reading Load: Ten books, typically ranging from Greene's Elegant Universe through Watson's Double Helix to Evans' In Defense of History.

Writing: To receive two hours of credits, the student must either submit a term paper drawing upon themes common to some subset of these presentations (not necessarily those of the student's own concentration) or take charge of the seminar for one half of one of these sessions, using a reading of his or her own choice. Those wishing three credits must both submit a paper and lead half a session. Maximum class size 15, by permission of the Honors Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

HONORS 390. Junior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HONORS 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 — Franz Kafka in Context. [3 credits]. Meets with German 449.001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 449.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 002 — Inside the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal. Meets October 6-29. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=October 14).

Instructor(s): Robert Donia

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

mini/short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This four-week minicourse will introduce students to the work of the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague (Netherlands). Students will examine the testimony, judgments, internal procedures, and precedents in the case against former Serbian President Slobodan Miloseviæ and other key cases. With this understanding, the course will move to consider some of the broader issues that the Tribunal's work has raised. These issues include: Is the Tribunal politically motivated and therefore inherently biased? Even without express political motivation, might its premises bias the results toward western legal norms? Do international institutions of justice contribute to reconciliation and/or closure to intergroup violence? Is the Tribunal a useful precedent for trying war criminals in other cases? What should be the relationship between international institutions of justice and sovereign states? For those enrolled for credit, the course grade will be based on a paper of 6-10 pages addressing one of these broad issues. The writer may take a position on one of the issues and use information from the course to argue the case, or may summarize conflicting positions on one of the issues.

This is not a course in international law, and it neither presupposes legal knowledge nor aims for legal conclusions. It is designed to offer insights into how this particular court works and the implications of its operations for broader questions of international justice. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY — Robert J. Donia received a Ph.D. in History from the University of Michigan in 1976. His first book, based on extensive original research in archives and libraries in Sarajevo, was published in 1981 with the title, Islam under the Double Eagle: The Muslims of Bosnia and Hercegovina, 1878-1914 in 1981. After teaching at two universities in the late 1970's, he worked for Merrill Lynch as a financial consultant and manager from 1981-1998. He has frequently visited Bosnia-Herzegovina both during and after the war of 1992-95. In 1994 he and John Fine, Professor in the History Department at Michigan, co-authored Bosnia and Hercegovina: A Tradition Betrayed.

In the past six years he has provided expert witness testimony in eight cases before the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, and he frequently serves as a consultant in matters before the court. In the past three years he has briefed US military personnel prior to their deployments to international peacekeeping missions in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo. He visits the University of Michigan 3-4 times a year and participates in various programs of the Center for Russian and East European Studies and the International Institute. At present he is working on a book on the history of Sarajevo. He lives in San Diego, California.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/Department

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 003 — Enlightenment. [4 credits]. Meets with English 371.001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 371.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor


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