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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 6:49 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



LING 102. First Year Seminar (Humanities).

Section 001 — Language Families and Language Change.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Linguists have grouped languages into families on the basis of presumed or established, descent from a common ancestor. One such family is the Romance languages, the descendants of the spoken Latin of the Roman Empire. This seminar seeks to examine the validity and usefulness of the concept "language family" by showing the similarities and differences among the various modern Romance languages. It will also seek to introduce some of the linguistic and non-linguistic (social, historical) processes by which Latin evolved into the distinct Romance languages (French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Rumanian).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 102. First Year Seminar (Humanities).

Section 002 — Academic Discourse.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar offers an introduction to university work as seen through the lens of language and discourse. What are the characteristics of academic texts and what kinds of reading strategies do they require? What does it mean to write academically? What are the discoursal features of your lectures and textbooks? Is academic speech more like conversation or academic prose? Class-discussion, independent research, and a term-paper (individual or joint).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 103. First Year Seminar (Social Science).

Section 001 — How Children Learn Language.

Instructor(s): Elaine McNulty (emcnulty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will look at various theories of how children learn the rules of their first language. It will examine the child's development of the rules of word formation, sentence structure, and meaning. We will study typical language errors that children make to see what these errors reveal about the child's rules. We will also look at studies of language acquisition by deaf and blind children and explore the implications of these studies for language learning in general.

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LING 140. Introduction to Deaf Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paula D Berwanger (pberwang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to Deaf culture within the United States, and focuses on the link between culture and language (in this case, American Sign Language). An analysis of medical and cultural models of perceiving deafness is investigated to familiarize students with the range of perceptions held by members of the cultural majority and the effect it has on the Deaf community. The influencing factors of educational systems on deaf children are reviewed to understand the link between language systems used in the classroom and the development of a Deaf identity. The historical roots of American Sign Language and the value of language preservation provide for additional overview of attitudes in American society. Social adaptations to deafness and individual factors of communicative and linguistic development are analyzed for understanding the implications of family and social systems on deaf children and adults.

Instructor will use a course pack. There will be weekly written assignments (1-2 paragraph reaction statements to readings from the course pack) or weekly quizzes. There will be a written midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 150. Elementary American Sign Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paula D Berwanger (pberwang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of LING 140. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

LING 150 is a beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL) that introduces students to basic grammatical structures and sign vocabulary through intensive classroom conversational interactions. Emphasis is on practical communicative functions as students learn how to communicate in a visual-gestural channel. Classroom work is supplemented by video-taped workbook exercises to facilitate development of receptive language skills. LING 140 (Introduction to Deaf Culture) is a pre- or co-requisite for this course. Class will meet two days, two hours per day. There will be 1-2 hours of weekly lab work to be completed at the Language Resource Center.

This course will be conducted exclusively in American Sign Language. Required course materials include a workbook and videotape. Handouts will also be provided. An optional Dictionary of ASL is suggested. Students will complete weekly assignments from the workbook. There will be both a midterm and final consisting of both written exams and videotaped Sign Language interactions. A 3-5 page term paper is also required (a report on a Deaf social event, on an interaction with Deaf persons, or on an approved article or subject).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 210. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Nothing is more distinctly human than our ability to use language. Because of that, we expect that the study of language can provide insight into "human nature." This course is an analytic introduction to the methods linguists use for describing languages (although general training in analytic thought is our ultimate goal). Drawing on examples from a large number of the world's languages, we will look at the sounds of language, how they are produced and how they pattern into words; we will study the diverse ways in which individual languages approach processes of word and sentence formation, while we ask whether there are processes universal to all languages. By focusing simultaneously on language data and on the techniques used by linguists to make sense of these data, we will see that our understanding of the object of inquiry (language) is influenced by our methods of inquiry. Requirements include problem-solving assignments, quiz(zes), and midterm and final exams; there is no prerequisite except an interest in language and thinking.

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LING 211. Introduction to Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu) , San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/211/001.nsf

From time immemorial human beings have been curious about what appears to be a uniquely human possession, human language — about its structure, its diversity, its use, and its effects on others. This course explores the human capacity for language. We begin with a discussion of the uniqueness of human language and then review major aspects of language structure common to all human languages: sound systems, words and their meanings, sentence structures and meaning. We will then examine child language development, speech perception, and language change; finally, we will extend our results to discussions of language variation, including social and political attitudes toward language (for instance, what is "Standard English", and is it better than other dialects of English? And should English become the official national language of the United States?). Course requirements include regular homework assignments, one midterm exam, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 212. Introduction to the Symbolic Analysis of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven P Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (MSA). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to some basic mathematical concepts and techniques used in the study of language. What is language? What characterizes a scientific account, or formal analysis, of language? What is a formal analysis good for? We will introduce a number of mathematical tools, including context-free and transformational grammars, logic, and probability, and look at how these mathematical tools are used to construct and evaluate models of language. The focus will be on syntax (how sentences are put together) and semantics (what they mean). We will also consider how models of language are used to understand language processing by man and machine. The treatment will be introductory, giving a broad overview and a framework for further study rather than in-depth coverage of any one topic. There are no specific prerequisites.

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LING 250. Intermediate American Sign Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paula D Berwanger (pberwang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 151. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students in this intermediate course in American Sign Language (ASL) will learn more advanced communicative forms including understanding the essential role of facial communication (non-manual behaviors) in forming expressions. Additional vocabulary including idiomatic expressions will be introduced to expand students' abilities to understand and converse appropriately in various settings. Through a conversational approach, students will continue to study selected literature, history, culture, and outlooks of Deaf people in order to develop an understanding of appropriate standards of communicating in ASL. Students completing LING 250 will have acquired a basic understanding of how to communicate in a visual-gestural channel in order to receive and express ASL sentences in everyday conversational interactions. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes short presentations and situational role playing. There will be 1-2 hours of weekly lab work to be completed at the Language Resource Center.

This course will be conducted exclusively in American Sign Language. Required course materials include a workbook and videotape. Handouts will also be provided. An optional Dictionary of ASL is suggested. Students will complete weekly assignments from the workbook. There will be both a midterm and final consisting of both written exams and videotaped Sign Language interactions. A 3-5 page term paper is also required (a report on a Deaf social event, on an interaction with Deaf persons, or on an approved article or subject).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 313. Sound Patterns.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): José R Benkí (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~benki/L313/

This course explores two fundamental aspects of the sounds of human languages: speech sounds as physical entities (phonetics) and speech sounds as linguistic units (phonology). In viewing sounds as physical elements, the focus is articulatory descriptions: How are speech sounds made? What types of articulatory movements and configurations are used to differentiate sounds in the world's languages? In this part of the course, the goal is to learn to produce, transcribe, and describe in articulatory terms many of the sounds known to occur in human languages. In the next part of the course, the focus is on sounds as members of a particular linguistic system. Phonological data from a wide range of languages are analyzed — that is, regularities or patterns in sound distribution are extracted from the data set and then stated within a formal phonological framework. We will also construct arguments to support the proposed analyses, and will find that phonetic factors play a crucial role in validating phonological analyses. Throughout the course, a major emphasis is that speech sounds are simultaneously physical and linguistic elements, and that these two aspects of sound structure are interdependent. Class sessions will consist of lectures, phonetic practice, and discussion of phonological data sets. Course grades will be based on weekly assignments, midterm, and take-home final exam. LING 210, 211, 411, or permission of instructor is required to take the course.

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LING 315. Introduction to Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/ling/pires/ling315.html

This course investigates the syntax (sentence structure properties) of human language. It addresses the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. The focus here is on human language as a specific cognitive capacity restricted to humans, rather than on the individual languages (e.g., English, Arabic, Hindi) that are made possible by the existence of this capacity. For this reason, the course explores in detail many structural properties that are common across different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words — 'who', 'what' and so on — as most languages do). In order to explain this and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Korean or Turkish as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to.

it is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in this short description (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say 'Who do you like?' in English, instead of 'You like who?', a possible word order similar to the one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language — which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task — can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience.

Prerequisites: Although there are no official prerequisites, students usually take one introductory course in linguistics (LING 210, 211 or 212) before taking this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 316(314). Aspects of Meaning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/316/001.nsf

This course focuses on the core aspects of the representation of meaning in human language. It adopts a compositional approach to meaning: how humans combine basic linguistic units (e.g., words or lexical items) into complex linguistic expressions that allow them to represent the complex aspects of reality and thought in natural language. More specifically, the course focuses on the connection between the structure of linguistic expressions (i.e., their syntax) and the construction of meaning (semantics). It adopts a simple but precise and powerful approach to meaning, focusing on the conditions under which complex linguistic expressions are true or not true. The students will become familiar with various tools that are relevant for a theory of meaning in human language, including set theory, propositional and predicate logic, (generalized) quantifier theory, scope and polarity.

Prerequisite: an introductory course in linguistics (LING 210, 211, 212 or equivalent), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 317. Language and History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William H Baxter III (wbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Languages enable us to record history, but languages themselves are also products of history, and of prehistory. Many clues about the past are to be found in the vocabulary and structure of individual languages. Much can also be deduced from how languages are distributed in space, and how they are related to each other. Through readings and hands-on exercises, this course will introduce students to the basic methods of historical linguistics (including reconstruction of extinct languages, dialect geography, and mathematical methods), and apply them to examples drawn from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, including areas of current research and controversy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 320. Computer Programming for Linguistics and Language Studies.

Section 001 — Meets with LING 510.

Instructor(s): Steven P Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (MSA). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for linguists and others in humanities and social sciences with interest in the computational study of language, this course provides essential programming skills for language processing, including corpus processing (sociolinguistics, language preservation, authorship studies), and computational modeling of parsing (psycholinguistics, computational linguistics).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 339 / CAAS 339. African American Languages and Dialects.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rustyb/339/

This course examines language use in African American communities. The course will begin with an overview of the languages by people of African descent in the Western Hemisphere. We will then examine the grammars of pidgin and Creole languages in the Caribbean and the social factors related to their history and current use. The remainder of the course will focus on questions related to African American (Vernacular) English (AAE). After discussing the importance of AAE in literature, music and verbal art, we will take a detailed look at the grammatical structure of AAE. We will then discuss various theories about the history of AAE and its relationship to languages of western Africa, Caribbean Creoles and other varieties of English. Then we will examine issues related the education of African American children, including a variety of educational approaches for teaching Standard English to speakers of AAE, the Ebonics controversy of the late 1990's, and the Ann Arbor "Black English" trial in the late 1970's. Finally, we will look at social and political issues related to the use of African American English, focusing on questions of authenticity, identity, appropriation, and mocking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 342. Perspectives on Bilingualism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 272, or 210, or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A number of interesting issues can be dealt with in a course on bilingualism, all of great current relevance. Examples are acquisition of language(s) by children in bilingual families; the bilingual brain; aspects of bilingual knowledge/competence; multilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States; attitudes towards bilingualism. Students will be encouraged to work where relevant with their own languages and endeavor systematically to frame their own experience of bilingualism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 350. Perspectives on Second Language Learning and Second Language Instruction.

Section 001 — Meets with LING 450.001.

Instructor(s): Helen J Morley (hjmorley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 450.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore past and current directions in both theoretical and practical aspects of second/foreign language learning and teaching. The course will examine a number of language learning/teaching paradigms and focus on the changing forms and functions of methodology, technique, and approach as the emphasis of language pedagogy has shifted from teacher-directed, drill and pattern practice to learner-focused, task-based instruction. Students will have an opportunity to reflect upon and analyze their own language learning experiences and begin to critique and understand the instructional needs of varying language learning populations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 374(409) / ANTHRCUL 374. Language and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

LING 385. Experiential Practice.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

LING 395. Individual Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Adequately prepared students can pursue individual research with a member of the faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

LING 402. Research Seminar in Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least one of LING 313, 315, 316, and at least two other courses in Linguistics. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/402/001.nsf

Offers advanced Linguistics students the opportunity to investigate a research topic in depth and to gain experience in presenting their research to their peers. Each student chooses a topic, writes a research proposal, and writes preliminary and final drafts at each stage of the research.

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LING 406 / ENGLISH 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 406.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 411. Introduction to Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not intended for Linguistics concentrators. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Not open to students with credit for LING 211.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/411descrip.html

Linguistics is the scientific study of human natural language, and has intrinsic connections to related fields such as anthropology, cognitive psychology, philosophy, and studies of particular languages. The results of linguistics also are increasingly being applied to problems in those fields as well as in computer science, language teaching, and others. This course is a sophisticated overview to the field for graduate students and advanced undergraduates in related areas of scientific and humanistic inquiry. We will cover the major subfields of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics, as well as those areas of linguistics that interface closely with other social and behavior sciences, such as sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics. Readings will come from both the primary literature and a selection of textbook materials. Requirements will include exams and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 420. Word and Metaphor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 315 and 316. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

English is an analytic language, organized around syntactic constructions of largely uninflected words. It's a well-known fact that English syntax is deep and complex, but as it turns out, those uninflected words are very interesting, too. This is a course in lexical semantics and cognitive word grammar, focusing on English, though not exclusively, with special attention to the study of metaphor, or 'cognitive blending', as it's sometimes called.

Metaphor is one of the most fascinating phenomena in human experience; using a metaphor consists in treating something as if it were something else, while realizing of course that it's not. In other words, lying, and getting away with it. Not only do we get away with it, we do it all the time; the overwhelming majority of utterances are metaphoric in nature, as is the cognition behind them. Metaphor, language, and thought are intimately connected.

In this course, we will explore a number of case studies of metaphor, how they structure the lexicon and how they influence the grammar. Topics treated include:

  • basic metaphor themes (container, conduit, action/force, etc.)
  • the embodied mind
  • lexical fields
  • sensory modalities, pattern recognition, and lexical categories
  • verb classes and their effect in syntax
  • classifiers and sound symbolism
  • mental spaces and metaphor mappings
  • denotation and connotation
  • presupposition, entailment, and implicature
  • negation, quantification, and modality
  • cross-linguistic and -cultural differences

There will be occasional homework, two papers and a term project, and considerable reading.

Prerequisites: LING 314 or 315 or 316 or equivalent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 447 / PSYCH 445. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/445/001.nsf

See Psychology 445.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 — Language Contact. Meets with Ling 792.001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Language contact is a fact of life for most of the world's people: throughout the world, monolingualism is the exception rather than the norm. This course will survey social and linguistic aspects of language contact, with special emphasis on the linguistic results of different kinds of contact situations. We will cover the following topics: the social settings of language contacts; some social and linguistic predictors of contact-induced language change; mechanisms of contact-induced change; how to identify contact-induced changes retrospectively; linguistic areas; the origins and structures of pidgins, creoles, and bilingual mixed languages; and the various routes to language death. A single theme runs through the entire course: although robust generalizations can be drawn about many aspects of language contact, contact-induced change — like other aspects of language history — is essentially unpredictable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 — Optimality Theory. Meets with Ling 792.002.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rustyb/792/

This course presents a general overview of Optimality Theory (Prince and Smolensky 1993). The first part of the course will examine the development of OT within phonological theory. After learning the basic framework of OT, we will consider specific issues in phonology, including typological comparisons of phonological systems, the phonetic grounding of phonological constraints, dealing with cyclic phenomena in a non-derivational framework, nonconcatenative morphology and output-output correspondence, the problem of opacity and the development of sympathy theory, and the use of alignment constraints in the analysis of prosody and tone. The remainder of the course will consider extensions of OT to other areas of linguistics, including the use of OT in syntactic theory, OT models of language acquisition and language learnability, OT approaches to sociolinguistic variation, OT models of sound change and language contact phenomena.

Texts:

  • Rene Kager, Optimality Theory (Cambridge 1999)
  • John J. McCarthy A thematic guide to Optimality Theory (Cambridge 2001)
  • Bruce Tesar and Paul Smolensky, Learnability in Optimality Theory (MIT 2000)
  • April McMahon, Change, chance and optimality (Oxford 2000)
  • various journal articles

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 — Language and Socialization. Meets with Linguistics 792.004, Psychology 457.002, and Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Instructor(s): Marilyn Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu), Barbra Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on how language use relates to socialization into a group. We will examine this relationship with respect to topics such as identity formation, personhood, socioeconomic status, race, and cognition. We will read from the recent literature comparing these various aspects of socialization across different speech communities and then discuss questions such as the following. What kinds of (contextual, linguistic, developmental) constraints impact socialization? What is the nature of and how does the relationship between language and socialization vary across different contexts? Do the levels of analysis in the current research provide reasonable descriptions of both differences and similarities across contexts? We will also discuss where we would like to see future language-socialization research go. Upper-level or graduate student status is required. Some background in developmental or cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive or linguistic anthropology would be helpful. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in class discussions, a midterm, take-home exam and a paper on a topic related to the course, as well as attendance of presentations of at most three guest speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 — The Pleasure of the Text. Meets with RCCORE 334.002.

Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Core 334.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 493. Undergraduate Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

LING 495. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (LING 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

LING 496. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

LING 512. Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrice Speeter Beddor (beddor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 313. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/512/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the nature of speech sounds. One goal is to provide an overview of the type of sounds in the world's languages, and to train students in the production and transcription of these sounds. Practice with these sounds includes native-speaker presentations, in-class exercises, and software programs. A second goal is to arrive at an understanding of the speech process, which involves transmission of an acoustic signal from a speaker to a listener, and a corresponding description of speech sounds in terms of their articulatory (speaker-based), acoustic, and perceptual (listener-based) characteristics. In achieving this goal, students are introduced to basic principles of phonetic theory through readings, lectures, and hands-on experience in the phonetics laboratory. A third goal is to investigate interactions among articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual properties and to consider their possible consequences for the structure of sound systems. These phonetic properties are viewed as imposing constraints on the notion of "possible speech sound" and as contributing to the definition of "possible speech sound system" for human languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 515. Generative Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 315 or graduate standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Generative framework, syntactic structure is generated by a formal rule system and by applying constraints to its output. Some of these rules and constraints are hypothesized to be innate, or "unlearned" (perhaps a species-specific system that, in part, makes human language acquisition, or grammar growth, possible). Other aspects of our linguistic knowledge appear "learned", i.e. determined by an interaction of human biology and particular linguistic inputs. This course introduces this so-called "Principles and Parameters" approach to the analysis of human syntactic knowledge, focusing on how the various postulated ("simple") rules and constraints interact to generate ("complex") structures, characteristic of natural language sentences (such as the one you are now reading, and understanding). Course requirements may include weekly assignments, a midterm, and a final. For undergraduates, LING 315 and permission of the instructor are prerequisites. There is no prerequisite for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change.

Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), class participation (10%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 540 / AAPTIS 540. Structure of Persian and Iranian Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 540.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 541 / EECS 595. Natural Language Processing.

Section 001 — Meets with SI 661.

Instructor(s): Dragomir Radev (radev@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://tangra.si.umich.edu/~radev//NLP-fall2003/

An introduction to computational linguistics, stressing the processing of written language but with supplementary discussion of topics relating to spoken language. The course will be based on the following textbook: Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Speech and Natural Language Processing, Prentice Hall, 1999.

Topics covered in this course will include: finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context-free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and (if time permits) machine translation. There will be a midterm and a final examination, as well as a course project and regularly assigned exercises. Non-CS students without strong programming experience will not have to do a project that requires programming.

This course is the normal introduction to computational linguistics for advanced undergraduates or graduate students in Computer Science, the School of Information, or Linguistics, and normally is a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the area at the University of Michigan. For linguistics students, LING 513 and any other 400- or more advanced level linguistics course are prerequisites. Computer literacy is essential; some programming experience would be helpful. Students in Computer Science or the School of Information should take the versions of this course offered in those units.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 542 / ANTHRCUL 572. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 514 or graduate standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/542/001.nsf

This seminar presents a graduate-level introduction to sociolinguistics. Sociolinguists are researchers generally interested in trying to understand and systematically investigate language as it is related to social life. Sociolinguists do not have a common research paradigm, theory, epistemology, or set of research questions; however, they do share the conviction that an understanding of language can only be gained by considering both the extralinguistic and the linguistic contexts in which language is produced, intended, and interpreted. We will consider many of the topics that people who call themselves sociolinguists have studied, including language change, language contact, linguistic diversity, bi- and multilingualism, the relationships between social identity and language use, intercultural communication, and the connections of these issues to ideologies about language. We will focus on research from both sociolinguists and researchers in other relevant disciplines.

Throughout the course, we will be interested in several issues concerning the research and the researchers we are studying, such as:

  • What assumptions does this researcher make about language and about the nature of society and culture?
  • How does this work give us insight into the nature and structure of language?
  • How might this work fit into a general theory of language?
  • How does this work relate to the work of other researchers interested in similar questions?
  • What are the aims and methods used for focusing on this topic?
  • How can this research be applied to other disciplines such as education, rhetoric, sociology, psychology, communications, or anthropology or to other professionals (e.g., teachers, doctors, lawyers, therapists, etc.)?

Texts:

  • Milroy, Lesley and Matthew Gordon. 2002. Sociolinguistics: Methods and Interpretation. Blackwell
  • Johnston, Barbara. 2000. Qualitative Methods in Sociolinguistics.
  • Articles available through Electronic Reserves.

I assume a general understanding of the analysis of language and linguistic form. If you are uncertain about your background in these areas, please don't hesitate to discuss it with me.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for LING.


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