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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Middle Eastern and North African Studies


This page was created at 6:56 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



MENAS 491. Proseminar on the Arab World.

Section 001 — Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa with emphasis on Algeria as a reference model.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objective of the course is the assessment and evaluation of the performance of the MENA countries' economic (and political) system transformation.

The backbone of the course will be the design and implementation of the economic reforms necessary to gear the economies of the region toward a more open and freer market system for some countries, and from a command economic system toward a market-led economic system for other MENA countries. The course then will focus on the political economy of these economic transitional processes in the MENA region.

We shall examine the economic reforms from a broader sense than the one implied by the "Washington consensus" guidelines, the so-called first-generation reforms. That is, we shall also examine the second-generation reforms. Here, the word "second" doesn't refer to a time or sequencing connotation, but simply illustrates the fact that economists have lately recognized that an appropriate institutional framework is not only important or necessary, but rather crucial (I would say a sine qua non condition) for the success of the "pure" economic (the first generation) reforms, as it is indispensable to the good functioning of a market economy.

We will then examine such issues and questions as:

  • the political logic of reforms
  • the need for the region's economists, in the design of the reforms, to take into account the political constraints, feasibility, acceptability, and sustainability of the reforms
  • the need for politicians, in the implementation of the reforms, to consider the cost of delaying/postponing, some of the unpopular but badly needed reforms (privatization and restructuring of the state owned enterprises and the banking system); not only the economic cost in terms of resources allocation (misallocation?), but also in terms of social stability, social cohesion
  • authoritarian approach to the reforms as in the somewhat successful Tunisia experience, or "democratic" or less authoritarian approach as is the case with the less successful Algeria experience (think here of China and Russia or China and India)
  • the reasons for the missing link between economic reforms and accelerated economic growth throughout the region
  • external political influences on economic policies

To better understand and assess the transitional processes and to be able to examine the reasons for a too-slow economic growth in the region, the students will be introduced to such concepts and economic analysis instruments as:

  • government failure.
  • market failure.
  • the typology of the reforms: macroeconomic discipline, microeconomic liberalization.
  • the rationale of the reforms.
  • the expected outcomes.
  • the new role of government…

Lectures will adopt the following methodological approach: exploration of the region's experiences by considering issues taking Algeria's experience as a reference model, to which experiences of other countries will be compared, notably Tunisia, Morocco, Egypt, each time referring to it for comparison when evaluating the (bad) performances and (bad) outcomes of the region's countries. Students, in a group of three or so, can then focus on a country of their choice for their class presentations and course paper. But even in this case, students will be required to make some comparisons with other countries, within or outside the region. Another argument in considering Algeria as a reference model is that, through its past and present, this country has been "collecting" almost all the ingredients that somehow characterize partially or totally the region's countries, that is: colonialism, socialism, one party regime (one man shows), the heavy weight and the omnipresence of the army in the political arena, foreign debt crises, the switch from a command system to a market-oriented system, the transition toward a more democratic political and social systems, religious extremism, violence and terrorism.

Book: Richards, A. and Waterbury J. (1996) A Political Economy of the Middle East, 2nd Edition, Boulder, Co: Westview Press.

Grading:
Participation and attendance 20%
Oral presentation25%
Paper35%
Final exam 20%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MENAS 495. Senior Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with senior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (MENAS 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To be taken in the senior year by students in the area concentration program on Near Eastern and North African Studies who have been admitted to the Honors Program. Two to three advisors should be chosen; the principal advisor must be a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies. The proposal for the thesis should be submitted by the end of the junior year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

MENAS 520. Bibliographical Resources in Middle Eastern Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan H Rodgers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of a series of seminars in which the instructor introduces in the form of prepared bibliographies and short lectures the most significant bibliographical resources for the study of the Middle East, including printed materials and locally available and remote electronic media. The course treats the bibliographical structures of the disciplines of history, languages and literature, politics, economics, and sociology, religion and philosophy, and art and archaeology within the context of Middle Eastern area studies. The course will be of interest as well to students of the Ancient Near East, Bible, Judaica, Islamic studies, and the classical languages and literatures of the Near East.

As a seminar course, the students can expect to engage in the discussion, critical evaluation, and actual use of the bibliographical tools introduced in the course. Students will present in the seminar sessions critical evaluations of the materials introduced during the previous weeks' classes. The course will meet for one hour every week for the semester and is open for enrollment for credit by graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

Many students who decide to concentrate in Middle Eastern studies initially confront serious obstacles as they attempt to locate, gather, and organize resources for their own research projects or, as research assistants, for faculty. The source of the problem is the inability to make efficient use of the library and, in particular, inadequate preparation in the use of the available resources or the lack of knowledge of what bibliographical resources are available in the disciplines. An introduction to these resources, accompanied by assigned work in the use of the materials, will help students enrolled in the course overcome the difficulties in locating and organizing research materials for their papers or dissertations.

Evaluation criteria include class participation and a paper (e.g., an extensive bibliography of an area of interest to the student, a shorter more focused annotated bibliography, or a descriptive essay on an area of research).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MENAS 591. Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar.

Section 001 — Interactive Communication Simulations: Arab-Israeli Conflict / Middle East Simulation. Meets with EDUC 462.001.

Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (cmenas@umich.edu), Michael Fahy (michfahy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://ics.soe.umich.edu/info/aicinfo.html

This is a seminar for students beginning graduate study of the Middle East and North Africa. It introduces them to a broad range of disciplinary approaches and methodologies. The course concentrates on different areas and problems each year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

MENAS 591. Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar.

Section 002 — Interactive Communication Simulations: Place Out of Time. Meets with EDUC462.002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://government.soe.umich.edu/newics/poot.lasso

Enables students to apply their academic training and experience in advisory and control roles of ICS (Interactive Communication Simulations). "Hands-on" instruction in and application of computer conferencing, role-play simulations, negotiation, and policy making are offered. Simulation topics for this term is "Place out of Time."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

MENAS 591. Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar.

Section 003 — Odyssey: Uzbekistan. Meets with Education 361.001.

Instructor(s): Vika Gardner (vika@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/menas/591/003.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for MENAS.


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