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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Physics


This page was created at 6:49 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


The Physics Department discourages students from changing midstream from PHYSICS 140 to PHYSICS 125 or from PHYSICS 240 to PHYSICS 126, so it is important that students choose the first course of a physics sequence with care. Prospective engineers, physicists, and chemists should elect PHYSICS 140/240 rather than PHYSICS 125/126 because concentration programs in these areas require the PHYSICS 140/240 sequence. In the case of some departmental concentration programs (e.g., biology) or in special individual circumstances, students can elect or are encouraged to elect the PHYSICS 125/126 sequence. Some advisors will advise all students who have had calculus to elect PHYSICS 140/240. PHYSICS 140/240 can be elected by all students who have had calculus, but it should be elected only by students who enjoy solving difficult problems and who think that they will be good at it.


PHYSICS 106. Everyday Physics.

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Jens C Zorn (jenszorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. It is recommended that School of Education students take PHYSICS 420. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/physics/106/001.nsf

This course examines everyday phenomena and current technology in terms of physical concepts and laws. The subjects examined are wide ranging, and the discussion focuses on discovering common underlying themes. Examples of topics covered include: lasers, tornadoes, rainbows, computers, and satellites. This course emphasizes concepts rather than mathematical models. Grades are based on homework and exams. Curiosity is the major prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 106. Everyday Physics.

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Sa-lin Bernstein (salin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. It is recommended that School of Education students take PHYSICS 420. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/fall2003/106/

This course examines everyday phenomena and current technology in terms of physical concepts and laws. The subjects examined are wide ranging, and the discussion focuses on discovering common underlying themes. Examples of topics covered include: lasers, tornadoes, rainbows, computers, and satellites. This course emphasizes concepts rather than mathematical models. Grades are based on homework and exams. Curiosity is the major prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 107. 20th-Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fred C Adams

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school algebra and geometry. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for non-science concentrators who would like to learn about the two major revolutions that have both transformed twentieth-century physics and profoundly altered our perception of space, time, and matter; the special and general theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. No mathematical background beyond the high-school level is assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 112. Cosmology: The Science of the Universe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory Tarle (gtarle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Although no science prerequisites are required, exposure to physics at high school level would be helpful. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine the conceptual foundations underlying our current scientific understanding of the origin and evolution of the universe. The subject will be viewed through four astrophysical windows; the universe as a whole, galaxies, stars, and planets. We will explore how these various settings provide the essential ingredients for the genesis of life. Finally, we will examine the evolution of scientific thought that enabled humans to develop an understanding of the universe around them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 125. General Physics: Mechanics and Sound.

Instructor(s): Roberto D Merlin (merlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. PHYSICS 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 140 or 160.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/fall2003/125/

PHYSICS 125 and 126 constitute a two-term sequence offered primarily for students concentrating in the natural sciences, architecture, pharmacy, or natural resources; and for preprofessional students preparing for medicine, dentistry, or related health sciences. PHYSICS 125 and 126 are an appropriate sequence for any student wanting a quantitative introduction to the basic principles of physics but without the mathematical sophistication of PHYSICS 140 and 240 (or PHYSICS 160 and 260). Strong emphasis is placed on problem solving, and skills in elementary algebra and trigonometry are assumed. While a high school level background in physics is not assumed, it is helpful. PHYSICS 125 and 126 are not available by the Keller plan.

PHYSICS 125 covers classical mechanics (laws of motion, force, energy, and power) and mechanical wave motion (including sound waves). The final course grade is based on three one-hour evening examinations, class performance, and a final examination. PHYSICS 127 should be taken concurrently.

It Is Strongly Recommended That Students Elect One Section of PHYSICS 127 Lab Concurrently With PHYSICS 125.

Textbook: Physics, Cutnell and Johnson, Fifth Edition; supplements to the text that are sold separately (such as the Student Study Guide) may possibly be useful, but are not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 126. General Physics: Electricity and Light.

Instructor(s): Timothy A McKay (tamckay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 125. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. PHYSICS 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 240 or 260.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://hep.physics.lsa.umich.edu/p126/

See PHYSICS 125 for a general description of this introductory sequence of courses.

PHYSICS 126 is a continuation of PHYSICS 125. This course provides an algebra-based introduction to electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. The final course grade is based on three one-hour evening examinations, class performance, and a final examination. PHYSICS 128 should be taken concurrently.

Text Physics, Cutnell and Johnson, Fifth Edition, 2001.

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PHYSICS 127. Mechanics and Sound Lab.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with PHYSICS 125 is strongly recommended. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 141. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/

PHYSICS 127 is a laboratory course intended to accompany PHYSICS 125 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. Macintosh computers are used for data acquisition and analysis. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 128. Electricity and Light Lab.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with PHYSICS 126 is strongly recommended. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 241. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/

PHYSICS 128 is a laboratory course intended to accompany PHYSICS 126 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 140. General Physics I.

Instructor(s): Bradford G Orr (orr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 115. PHYSICS 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125 or 160.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/140/

Certain sections of Physics 140 are offered by the Keller Plan, a self-paced program without formal lectures. These sections are marked PSI in the Time Schedule. An information sheet describing the format of Keller Plan offerings is available in the Physics Student Services Office (2464 Randall Lab). Students who want to elect Physics 140 by the Keller Plan should read this information before registering.

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PHYSICS 141. Elementary Laboratory I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with PHYSICS 140 or 160 is strongly recommended. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 127. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/

Physics 141 is a laboratory course intended to accompany Physics 140 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports and quizzes. Macintosh computers are used for data acquisition and analysis. Texts: Physics 127/141 Lab Manual (new edition); Chapman; Hayden — McNeil (Required). Lab Notebook (Available in Supply Dept.) (Required).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 160. Honors Physics I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michal R Zochowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 115. Students should elect PHYSICS 141 concurrently. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125 or 140.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/160/

Physics 160 Is Designed For Honors Students, Physics Majors, and Other Qualified Science Or Engineering Majors. Students must Elect One Section of Physics 141. Students Are Expected To Know Calculus and Have a Background In High School Physics.

Physics 160 is a rigorous introduction to particle mechanics and the motion of extended objects. Particular topics include vectors, one- and two dimensional motion, conservation of laws, linear and rotational dynamics, gravitation, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics. Students should also elect a Physics 141 laboratory.

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PHYSICS 240. General Physics II.

Instructor(s): Myron K Campbell (myron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 140 or 160; and MATH 116. PHYSICS 240 and 241 are normally elected concurrently. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 126 or 260.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/240/

Electric and magnetic phenomena fascinate. Some are conspicuous, like the static that disrupts your hair in midwinter or the dramatic thunderstorms that rolled through Ann Arbor this summer. Others are more subtle, like the chemical forces which hold matter together and all the beautiful properties of light.

Explaining all these disparate phenomena with a single concise theory is one of the great successes of physical science. In PHYSICS 240 we will show you these electric and magnetic phenomena, and introduce you to the elegant and powerful theory with which we describe them.

We begin with electric charges and their interactions at rest (electrostatics). This will allow us to explore the crucial notion of an electric field and potential for the first time. We then consider steadily moving charges, and reveal the delightful connection between electricity and magnetism (magnetostatics). We'll then allow for all sorts of charge motions, and learn how light is an electric and magnetic phenomenon as well. Evaluation is based on performance on grades from homework, discussion section activities, three evening hourly examinations and a final examination.

Fundamentals of Physics. Halliday, Resnick, and Walker Sixth Edition.

Labs: It is highly recommended that you register for a PHYSICS 241 lab concurrent with this course. This lab is a required class for most of you, and taking it at the same time as the lecture class will maximize what you learn.

Exams and Grading:
Examinations: Your knowledge of the material will be tested by three midterm examinations and one final examination on the dates listed below. Please note the dates on your calendars NOW as there are no alternate midterms or makeup exams.
Exam 1: 2 October, 8-9:30 pm
Exam 2: 30 October, 8-9:30 pm
Exam 3: 20 November, 8-9:30 pm

Grading Policies:
Your course grade is determined as follows:
Online Homework 15%
Discussion Performance 15%
Three midterms 15% each

Final Exam 25%
or
Final Exam 15%
Lecture Participation 10%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 241. Elementary Laboratory II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent election with PHYSICS 240 or 260 is strongly recommended. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 128. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://instructor.physics.lsa.umich.edu/ip-labs/

PHYSICS 241 is a laboratory course intended to accompany PHYSICS 240 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PHYSICS 264 / CDB 264 / UC 264 / PSYCH 241. Introduction to Sensory Systems: Sound, Hearing, and Deafness.

Section 001 — Meets with Engineering 195.056.

Instructor(s): Kate F Barald, John C Middlebrooks , Karl Grosh (grosh@umich.edu), William E Grenawitzke

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/engr/195/056.nsf

See University Courses 264.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 333. PHYSICS 140 Tutor.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students enrolled in this experiential course serve as peer leaders in PHYSICS 140. Peer leaders conduct study group sessions under the direction of the course lecturer after receiving training from the staff at the Science Learning Center.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PHYSICS 334. PHYSICS 240 Tutor.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students enrolled in this experiential course serve as peer leaders in PHYSICS 240. Peer leaders conduct study group sessions under the direction of the course lecturer after receiving training from the staff at the Science Learning Center.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PHYSICS 340. Waves, Heat, and Light.

Waves–Heat–Relativity.

Instructor(s): Dante Eric Amidei (amidei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 240 or 260, and MATH 215. Concurrent election of PHYSICS 341 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://hep0.physics.lsa.umich.edu/dan/physics_340.htm

This course will develop the general mathematical formalism of vibrations and waves and apply this formalism to understand a variety of physical phenomena. The formalism will include damped and forced oscillators, resonance, coupled oscillators, traveling waves, standing waves, and Fourier analysis. The applications include seismometers, sound, organ pipes, EM radiation, light, antenna patterns, interference and diffraction phenomena. A few perhaps unexpected things along the way will include the physics of music, the Bohr atom, and why the sky is blue. The course will conclude with a quantitative examination of the principles of Special Relativity.

Texts:

Vibrations and Waves:
A. P. French, Vibrations and Waves
H. Hirose, Introduction to Wave Phenomena

Relativity:
Course pack

Grade Policy:
Homework 40%
Final Exam 30%
Exam 1 15%
Exam 2 15%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 341. Waves, Heat, and Light Lab.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 240 or 260. Concurrent election of PHYSICS 340 is strongly recommended. (2). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

PHYSICS 341 is a laboratory course intended to accompany PHYSICS 340 and provide a perspective on physics as an experimental science. The experiments performed cover topics that include temperature measurement, black body radiation, optics, interference, diffraction, and the speed of light. Evaluation is based on participation and performance in the laboratory classes, and on written laboratory reports.

Required Books, Calculator and Floppy Disk:

  • Waves, Light & Heat Laboratory Workbook for Physics 341.
  • University Physics', by Young and Freedman. (as Ref. book)
  • Laboratory notebooks: Two bound quadrille notebooks, > 60 pages, 5x5 quad. vA digital calculator.
  • A floppy disk or a CD for your data.

Syllabus: The following experiments have been selected for this course:

  • Experiment 1: Temperature and the ideal gas law
  • Experiment 2: Blackbody radiation and the Stefan-Boltzmann law
  • Experiment 3: Geometric Optics
  • Experiment 4: Polarization
  • Experiment 5: Interference and diffraction
  • Experiment 6: Speed of light

Each experiment will take two lab sessions. A detailed schedule is attached at the end of this note.

Grades:
Lab Notebooks (raw data recording) 30%
Lab Report (analysis based on raw data) 50%
Quizzes (Given at the beginning of the class) 10%
Housekeeping (return the borrowed equipment) 10%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 390. Introduction to Modern Physics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wolfgang B Lorenzon (lorenzon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 340 and MATH 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lorenzon/classes/2003/phys390-2003.html

This course is a quantitative introduction to modern physics and includes a review of special relativity, the relationship of particles and waves, the Schrödinger equation applied to barrier problems, atomic structure and the interpretation of quantum numbers, the exclusion principle and its applications, structure of solids. This course includes a survey of the topics and techniques in several subfields of physics, including Solid State, Atomic, Nuclear, and Particle Physics. The class will meet as a lecture group. Applications of the principles will be considered in the lecture section on a regular basis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 401. Intermediate Mechanics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James T Liu (jimliu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and MATH 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://pauli.physics.lsa.umich.edu/p401/

This is a one semester course on analytical mechanics, which is essentially a rigorous and mathematical treatment of classical mechanics. Some of the important concepts that will be covered include symmetry and conservation laws, small oscillations and normal coordinates, central forces and scattering, rigid body motion and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 402. Optics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David A Reis (dreis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and MATH 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. A student can receive credit for only one of EECS 334 or PHYSICS 402.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dreis/P402Fall2003/index.htm

Approximate List of Topics:

  • Wave Motion and Electromagnetism
  • Interaction of Light and Matter
  • Geometrical Optics
  • Polarization and Birefringence
  • Interference, Diffraction and Coherence
  • Physical Optics and Gaussian Beams (supplemental)
  • Lasers
  • Nonlinear Optics

Grading: 30% Homework, 20% Midterm 1, 20% Midterm 2, 30% Final.

Text: E. Hecht, Optics, 4th ed.

Supplemental Texts (many on reserve)

  • Fowles, Grant, "Introduction to Modern Optics" 1989 (great, inexpensive book, beginner to reference)
  • Pedrotti, Frank, "Introduction to Optics," 1992 (used last semester in Prof. Roe's class)
  • Jenkins, Francis, "Fundamentals of Optics," 1976 (classic book)
  • Born, Max, "Principles of Optics," ( Very advanced text on classical optics, excellent reference)
  • Yariv, Amnon, "Optical Waves in Crystals" (Advanced text on propagation of light in solids)
  • Boyd, Robert, "Nonlinear Optics," 2nd 2002 (Advanced text on nonlinear optics)
  • Siegman, Anothy, "Lasers," 1986 (Advanced text on lasers, also good reference for Gaussian optics)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 405. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Gerdes (gerdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 126/128 or 240 (or 260)/241, and MATH 216. Prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 451. PHYSICS 340 recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://zeno.physics.lsa.umich.edu/405/

This is a second course on the classical theory of electromagnetism at a level suitable for concentrators in the physical sciences or engineering. Familiarity with Maxwell's equations at the level of PHYSICS 240 is assumed. Other prerequisites include MATH 216 and concurrent or prior enrollment in PHYSICS 451. PHYSICS 340 is strongly recommended. The course elaborates on the theoretical content of the Maxwell theory as well as practical applications. Topics: review of vector calculus; electrostatic boundary value problems; magnetostatics; dielectric and magnetic materials; Maxwell's equations and electrodynamics; the wave equation, electromagnetic waves in free space, waves in conducting and dielectric media; electromagnetic radiation; sources of EM radiation.

Course Description: This course covers electromagnetic theory at a level suitable for junior-year physics majors or engineering students. The first part of the course is devoted to static electric fields in free space and in matter. The second part of the course focuses on an analogous treatment of magnetic fields, leading up to a discussion of electromagnetic induction and Maxwell's equations. The last part of the course gives an introduction to electromagnetic waves and radiation from moving charges. The prerequisites for this course are PHYSICS 126/128 or 240/241, MATH 216, and concurrent or prior enrollment in PHYSICS 451. PHYSICS 340 is strongly recommended.

E&M is one of the true core subjects in your physics education. As the first "modern" theory of one of the four basic forces of nature, Maxwell's electromagnetic theory laid the foundations for much of our modern understanding of the world, including special relativity and the modern theories of the strong and weak nuclear forces. In addition, principles of classical E&M are applied everywhere in our daily life, in areas such as power generation, communications, defense and aerospace, and medical imaging, contributing many billions of dollars to the world economy. E&M is also a beautiful subject to learn and to teach, and I hope you enjoy your exposure to it in this class.

Course Text: D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd edition (required). there will be three 90-minute midterm exams and a final examination; Problem sets are due approximately weekly. There is usually a strong correlation between the effort you put into the problem sets and your performance on the exams.

Key Dates: Midterm Exam #1: Wed. Oct. 1, 6-7:30PM
Midterm Exam #2: Tues. Nov. 4, 6-7:30PM
Midterm Exam #3: Tues. Nov. 25, 6-7:30PM
Final Exam: Wednesday, Dec. 17, 4-6PM

Grading:
Your final grade will be determined according to the following percentages:
Midterm #1 15%
Midterm #2 15%
Midterm #3 15%
Problem Sets 20%
Preflight Quizzes 10%
Final Exam 25%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 406. Statistical and Thermal Physics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark E Newman

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 390. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/courses/2003/phys406/

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of thermal physics including classical thermodynamics (the three laws, temperature, internal energy, entropy, and applications) and statistical mechanics (microscopic entropy, classical and quantum thermal distributions, ideal gases, Fermi and Bose gases, thermal radiation, electrons in metals, Bose-Einstein condensation, superfluidity).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 415. Special Problems for Undergraduates.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes experimental or theoretical research under the supervision of a faculty member. Generally a small facet of a large research undertaking is investigated in detail. This is an independent study course, and instructor permission is required. The appropriate form is available in the Physics Student Services Office, 2464 Randall Lab.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PHYSICS 419 / RCNSCI 419 / NRE 574 / PUBPOL 519. Energy Demand.

Section 001 — SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS.

Instructor(s): Marc H Ross, Gregory A Keoleian

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic college economics and senior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in physics.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/574/001.nsf

This course examines the production and consumption of energy from a systems perspective. Sustainability is examined by studying global and regional environmental impacts, economics, energy efficiency, consumption patterns, and energy policy. First, the physics of energy and energy accounting methods are introduced. Next, the current energy system that encompasses resource extraction, conversion processes and end-uses are covered. Responses to current challenges such as declining fossil fuels and climate change are then explored: unconventional fossil fuels, carbon sequestration, emerging technologies (e.g., renewable sources: biomass, wind, and photovoltaics; fuel cells) and end-use efficiency and conservation.

COURSE FORMAT: Learning in this course is facilitated through lecture, discussion, and in class exercises. In-class participation is a key element of the course and critical analysis and discussion of course topics is expected. Analytical skills are developed and demonstrated through problem sets, a term project and exams.

COURSE RESOURCES:
1. Course pack: available at Ulrich's (produced by Dollar Bill), corner of East and South University
2. Reference articles and reserve textbooks available at the Science Library (third floor of Shapiro Library)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION:
Class participation15%
Assignments10%
Term Project25%
Midterm Exam25%
Final Exam25%

COURSE OUTLINE:

  1. PART I. INTRODUCTION AND ENERGY FUNDAMENTALS
    • Sustainable Energy Systems: Issues for the 21st century
      • Why study energy?
      • Sustainable Energy Systems: Key Concepts
    • Physics of Energy: Laws of Thermodynamics
      • Energy Forms
      • First and Second Laws
      • Stocks and Flows
    • Energy Accounting I: EIA Convention
      • Energy Carriers
      • Primary Energy -- EIA Convention
      • Heat Rates
      • Site of Final Energy
    • Energy Accounting II: LCA Convention
      • Resource Energy (Total Fuel Cycle Accounting)
      • Life Cycle Energy Analysis
  2. PART II. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION (SUPPLY AND DEMAND)
    • Overview of Energy Production and Consumption
      • International and US Statistics
      • Carbon Emission Factor
      • Growth Rate Formalism
      • Forecasts and Projections
    • Fossil Energy Resources
      • Historical Review
      • Distribution and Classification of Fossil Resources
      • Projections of Future Supply
      • Drilling in the Alaskan Wildlife Refugee?
    • Electricity from Nonrenewable sources
      • U.S. and World Fuel Mix
      • Power Generation
      • Transmission and Distribution (Blackout 2003)
      • Plant Efficiency and Life Cycle Efficiency
      • Your electricity bill
    • Electricity: Power Plant Economics and Regulation
      • Fixed and Variable Costs
      • Deregulation and the California Crisis
    • Other Electricity Generating Systems
      • Cogeneration/ Combined Heat and Power
      • Distributed Power
      • What about Nuclear Power?
    • Commercial and Residential Sectors
      • Commercial and Residential Buildings Energy Consumption
      • Heating Degree Days
      • E-Commerce and the Internet: Saving Energy?
      • Standby Power
    • Industrial Sector
      • Energy Consumption by Manufacturers: Fuel and Non-fuel
      • Energy Intensity
      • Theoretical Limits
    • Transportation Sector
      • Historical Statistics
      • VMT Growth
      • VMT Policies
  3. PART III. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
    • Local and Regional Environmental Air Pollution
      • Criteria Air Pollutants (smog, acidification)
      • Environmental Externalities
    • Climate Change I: Climate Change Science
      • Greenhouse Effect
      • Feedback Mechanisms
    • Climate Change II: Impacts
      • Hydrology and Water Resources
      • Agriculture
      • Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems
      • Human Health
      • Human Settlements
      • Abrupt Climate Change
  4. PART IV. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY
    • Climate Change III: Climate Change Policy — International Perspectives
      • Kyoto Protocol
      • Policies of Developed and Developing Countries
      • UK Climate Policy
    • Energy Policy I: Economic Approaches
      • Policies Based on Energy Prices
    • Energy Policy II: Regulatory and Integrated Approaches
      • History of U.S. Energy Policy
      • Tradeable CO2 Permits with Caps
      • Incentives and Tax Credits
      • Performance Standards
      • Investment in R&D
  5. PART V. STRATEGY — STAY THE COURSE WITH FOSSIL FUEL
    • Fossil Fuels and Carbon Sequestration
      • Unconventional: Coal Tar/Oil Shale/Methane Hydrates
      • Five Sequestration Strategies:
        • Biological (Terrestrial) Sequestration,
        • Carbon Capture,
        • Geologic Sequestration,
        • Ocean Sequestration,
        • Advanced Concepts
  6. PART VI. STRATEGY — TRANSITION TO HYDROGEN ECONOMY
    • Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier
      • Generation
      • Storage
      • Utilization
  7. PART VII. STRATEGY — PROMOTE RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES
    • Introduction to Renewable Energy
      • Wind Energy
      • Wind Turbine Technologies
      • Wind Potential
      • Energy Performance and Environmental Impacts
      • Economics
    • Photovoltaics, Hydropower and Other Renewable Sources
      • PV and BIPV Technologies
      • PV Potential
      • Energy Performance and Environmental Impacts
      • Economics
      • Hydropower, Geothermal (Geological), Wave/Tidal
    • Biomass
      • Biomass Technologies

  8. PART VIII. STRATEGY — ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION
    • Automobiles — Fuel Economy Technology
      • Societal advantages of increased fuel economy
      • Energy transformations in a vehicle
      • Technologies to improve fuel economy
      • Cost analysis
    • Fuel Cell and Hybrid Vehicles

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 435. Gravitational Physics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jean P Krisch (jkrisch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 390 and 401. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Einstein theory of general relativity provides the foundation of gravitational physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. After an introduction to the theory, experimental tests of general relativity which were performed in the past, the implications of pulsars, black holes, supernovae, and cosmic background radiation as well as the ongoing experimental detection of gravitational waves are discussed. This is an elective course for concentrators in physical sciences. Regular exams as for any elective course in physics are given.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 441. Advanced Laboratory I.

Instructor(s): Roy Clarke (royc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course. (2). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://phys-advlab.physics.lsa.umich.edu/Phys441_442/

This course is a hands-on survey of the experimental foundations of modern physics. Some of the goals of the course are:

  1. To allow you to appreciate the experimental underpinnings of modern physics.

  2. To familiarize you with experimental techniques and instrumentation employed in contemporary research and industrial laboratories.

    To give you a survey, via experiment, of many of the sub-fields of modern physics, and the pertinent experimental issues in each.

  3. To expose you to the realities of the laboratory experience, where things don't always work as planned, where the issues are not always clear, and where progress depends on perseverance, ingenuity, and judgment.

Students taking this course can select from over 30 experiments that are offered in the various subfields of physics, including condensed matter, atomic, molecular and optical physics, and nuclear and particle physics. See course homepage for a complete listing and descriptions of the experiments that are offered.

PHYSICS 441 is offered Fall Term and PHYSICS 442 is offered Winter Term. Physics concentrators are required to take both terms and perform different experiments in the two courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 451. Methods of Theoretical Physics I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Daniel Wells (jwells@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 215 and 216. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jwells/Physics451/

This is a course in the mathematical methods used in physics and is considered necessary preparation for graduate school. Among the topics treated are orthogonal functions and vector spaces, complex variables, differential equations and their special functions, Fourier series, and aspects of group theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 453. Quantum Mechanics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Keith RileS (kriles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PHYSICS 390. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://tenaya.physics.lsa.umich.edu/~keithr/p453/

This course begins with an overview of the experimental and theoretical foundations for quantum mechanics. The theory is developed and applied to simple physical systems, with examples taken from atomic, molecular, condensed matter, nuclear, and particle physics. Topics include: basics of the Schrödinger equations and its solutions in rectangular and spherical coordinates; properties, uses, and interpretations of state functions; expectation values and physical observables; coherence, correlation, and interference. Other topics include spin, the exclusion principle, and some quantum statistical mechanics.

Required Text: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, David J. Griffiths (1995)

Other Sources for the Interested Student (on course reserve in the Science Library):
Quantum Physics, Stephen Gasiorowicz, (1996)
Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei and Particles, Robert Eisberg & Robert Resnick (1985)

Grading: Course grades will be based on homework (30%), the two in-class exams (20% each) and the final exam (30%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHYSICS 496. Senior Thesis, I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PHYSICS 497), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students get introductory experience and research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a senior thesis project. If work is not completed in the Winter Academic Term, student would register for 497 in the Winter Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PHYSICS 497. Senior Thesis, II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of PHYSICS 496. Students who do not complete their thesis research in PHYSICS 496 may continue to PHYSICS 497. If continuing, a grade of Y is given for PHYSICS 496 and a final senior thesis grade is given upon completion of the research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PHYSICS 498. Introduction to Research for Honors Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PHYSICS 499), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Honors students get introductory experience with research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a thesis used to satisfy that part of the Honors requirement. If work is not completed in Fall Term, the student would register for 499 in Winter Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PHYSICS 499. Introduction to Research for Honors Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of physics concentration advisor. (2-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Honors students get introductory experience with research work with faculty, the results of which could provide the basis for a thesis used to satisfy the part of the Honors requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Graduate Course Listings for PHYSICS.


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