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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 6:49 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the origins and development of Western political thought. We will discuss the normative foundations of political theory, the birth of democracy and its critics, the distinction among different regimes-types, the emergence of republicanism, the structure of social contract theories, the relationship between individual rights and popular sovereignty, and the emergence and consolidation of mass liberal democracy. Questions related to the nature of political power, the ends of politics, the sources of sovereignty, the concept of political freedom, the quest of justice, law and property, the role of individuals in the political community, the various justifications of political obligation, and to the logic of resistance and revolution will be of central importance.

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POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. The kinds of questions considered might include the following: What impact do interest groups have on governmental policy? Are there real differences between the two major political parties? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? How do members of Congress decide how to vote? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

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POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings — and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and India. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

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POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by setting standards for judging theories of international politics and reviews well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is then used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events.

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POLSCI 190. Freshman Seminar in Political Science.

Section 001 — Leadership and Democracy.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mmanty/teaching/index.html

Modern political culture seems to have a contradictory obsession with leadership, on the one hand, and democracy, on the other. We treat strong leaders as heroes, study leaders' histories, and debate their qualities. At the same time, we celebrate the idea that political power belongs to equal citizens. This seminar for first-year students studies the tension between leadership ideals and democratic values. We explore the question through readings which are historical and contemporary, scholarly and popular. We will try to understand what "leadership" and "democracy" mean, what different models of leadership are compatible with democracy, and what it says about politics.

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POLSCI 301(400). Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is two-fold: (1) to give the student a sense of the history of political philosophy from the ancient Greek period to the end of the sixteenth century; and (2) to help the student become aware of the complexities and assumptions entailed in the articulation of a coherent political theory. We will be reading the works of such major political philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Machiavelli. We will be concerned with such issues as the relation between nature and convention, the sources of legitimacy, the role of the individual in the political community and the value and purpose of political life. Readings will be from primary sources. Class meetings will include both lectures and discussions. Course requirements will include two exams during the term and a final.

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POLSCI 306(406). American Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take as its basis the study of canonical texts in American political thought. The ideas that have shaped American politics are heterogeneous and conflicting. We will analyze these tensions through the close reading of primary texts. We will consider the major conceptual foundations of American politics: democracy, freedom, limited government, individualism, toleration, and civil and political equality. These concepts will be considered in the light of other important traditions that have shaped American citizenship. These other traditions include the emphasis on local communities, the work ethic, capitalist labor market organization, class mobility, race-based oppression, and gender inequality in the public and private spheres.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to think, speak, and write critically about the core concepts that shape the American political system and make up the American tradition in political thought. They should have a good understanding of what these concepts are, where they originated, and how the work together, and against each other, to form a dynamic, evolving national discourse. An analytic approach will be emphasized. By the end of the class, students should be able to discuss the nation's ongoing process of "re-founding", the often controversial process of national re-defining and re-imagining done in relation to national principles. Exploring contests, conversations, and debates within and about the texts we read, we will traverse the intellectual terrain that is the foundation of our national self-understanding.

Course readings will be comprised of a selection of longer works including but not limited to "The Federalist Papers," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," "The Education of Henry Adams," and a novel by Herman Melville. The assignment structure will be somewhat innovative but will include a final essay exam.

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POLSCI 313(480). Political Mobilization and Policy Change.

American

Section 001 — Politics of the Civil Rights Movement.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the evolution, nature, and role of the Civil Rights Movement within the American political system. It is a study of political mobilization in the African American community and how that mobilization via a social movement that combined interest group politics with limited, electoral behavior and partisanship influenced and shaped public policy to the needs and concerns of the community. The course will explore the individual, leadership, alliance, and policy goals of this mobilization.

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POLSCI 317(412). Courts, Politics and Society.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer F Kirkpartrick (jennetk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/317/001.nsf

This course examines the genesis and the nature of judicial power as it has developed throughout American history. Paying particular attention to the role of the Supreme Court in American life, the course introduces students to the history of judicial review and the judicial process. It focuses on two questions: 1) How has the Court's role in the governing process changed over time? and 2) under what circumstances is the Court effective in producing political and social change? These questions will be explored through readings in judicial history, public law, and historically significant Supreme Court cases. Class meetings will include both lectures and discussions.

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POLSCI 317(412). Courts, Politics and Society.

American

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Greene (lgre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will study the role of the judiciary in the United States from its origin in 1789 through the present day. Special attention will be given to the concept of judicial federalism as it applies to both the state and federal courts. We will discuss concepts of judicial restraint and ripeness for review as being essential to the judiciary remaining a co-equal branch of government. Additionally, we will consider the main aspects of judicial power and its limitations.

In order to better understand the workings of the judiciary much time will be spent considering court decisions and their political ramifications. In our study of judicial decision-making we will consider the following: fact finding by the courts; precedent and legal reasoning; statutory interpretation; constitutional interpretation and the process of judicial decision-making.

All these topics will be explored through readings, lectures and class discussions.

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POLSCI 322(417). Legislative Process.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the legislative process, with special emphasis on the United States Congress. Among the major topics addressed will be: the theory and practice of representation; Legislative elections; coalition-building; committee policy making; floor voting decisions; Legislative-executive relations; legislative rules and procedures. One of our primary emphases will be on U.S. congressional elections. Requirements: two to three exams, one paper.

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POLSCI 325(420) / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bill Jennings (wpjennin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/484/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 484.001.

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POLSCI 326(421). American State Government.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

State governments are alternatively ignored as irrelevant, squeezed fiscally by the federal government, or championed as policy laboratories and the providers of government tailored to fit local needs. The American union began as a compact of independent states under the Articles of Confederation, but has evolved to the point where the states often seem to be no more than administrative levels of government. No education in the American government is complete without a serious examination of its vertical construction.

  • What is the relevance of state government to the American political system?
  • How does federalism affect our economy, our domestic policy, our foreign affairs?
  • And how do we voters control a government divided vertically?

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POLSCI 327(423). Politics of the Metropolis.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps327f03.html

This course examines the political life of American cities and the metropolitan regions in which they are embedded. Relevant institutions include city government, public authorities, the business sector, nonprofit agencies and organizations, neighborhood groups, and more. Issues include city and regional governance, economic development, urban sprawl, the provision of public services, and the ways that race, ethnicity, and social class are implicated in these and other issues.

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POLSCI 330(487). Psychological Perspectives on Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cara J Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Explanations of political phenomena often rest on psychological assumptions. Studies of leadership, decision-making, socialization, public opinion and voting, violence and revolution, and propaganda and persuasion all have a psychological base. The purpose of this lecture course is to survey major currents of theoretical and empirical work in the psychological analysis of politics. Grades will be based on examinations and papers.

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POLSCI 339(428) / ASIAN 428 / SOC 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course seeks to convey an overall understanding of the evolution of China during the tumultuous twentieth century, with a strong focus on the current period. While concerned primarily with domestic developments, the course also considers the impact of the global arena on China and the issues China poses in international politics. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China. Three hours of lecture and one of discussion per week. Term paper and two exams.

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POLSCI 341(441). Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces the comparative political science of developed democracies. It aims to elucidate some systematic relationships that may exist between certain social, political, and economic variables in such countries, not to detail the political history of developed democracies, much less of any subset thereof. For example, we study whether and why different electoral systems might produce different party systems not whether Labour won the last British election or by how much per se. The Labour victory is an example of a datum which, combined with (preferably lots of) other data, may help us to evaluate the empirical validity of our theories about the relationships between variables. We define our universe of cases, developed democracies, as those countries in which relatively liberal democracy and relatively free-market capitalism no longer engender serious debate but rather serve as the systemic bounds within which politics occur. Empirically, that corresponds least ambiguously to the countries of North America, Western Europe, Australasia, and Japan, and so these countries serve as our empirical referent. These 24± countries are our cases; i.e., each country-time exemplifies a political system with certain features. Comparing across as many of these country-times as possible, we hope to develop an understanding of the systematic relationships between socio-politico-economic variables.

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POLSCI 344(444). Government and Politics of Russia.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science or permission of instructor. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An analysis of the contemporary Russian political system. Special emphasis is placed on comparing it with its Soviet predecessor and more familiar Western models. Coverage includes electoral behavior, mass and elite attitudes, center-region relations and high politics.

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POLSCI 347(448). Politics and Society in Latin America.

Comparative

Section 001 — GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA: Democracy, Parties, Elections and Institutions.

Instructor(s): Jose Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/347/001.nsf

After an analysis of the common historical background, the course will consider the current characteristics of democratic government in Latin America, its achievements, shortcomings, and perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of parties and other institutional factors on the stability and quality of democracy in the region. The cases of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela will be examined closely. No prior knowledge of the region is assumed or required.

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POLSCI 350(451) / JUDAIC 451. The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in East European and/or Jewish history, and Comparative Politics is recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the political and cultural history of modern East European Jewry over the last hundred years. By doing so, we aim to illuminate interrelationships between ethnicity, politics, and culture. We study how East European Jews developed means for dealing with states and societies that regarded them as alien; how states dealt with this ethno-religious minority; and, more generally, how states manage multiethnic societies. Ideologies, movements, parties, and institutions are analyzed, partly through literature, folklore, music, and art. Requirements include midterm and final examinations and a term paper.

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POLSCI 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark A Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will present both factual and interpretive material about the Arab- Israeli conflict, an international dispute that has lasted for almost a century and whose significance extends far beyond the Middle East. After providing background information about Israel and the Arab world, including the Arabs of Palestine, the course will trace the historical development of the conflict from its origins in the 19th century until the present. The course also will examine the most important issues associated with the conflict, giving special attention to the competing territorial claims advanced by Israelis and Palestinians and to the rights of self-determination asserted by each. Attention will be given as well to relations between Israel and the Arab states.

In discussing the many controversial issues associated with the Arab-Israeli conflict, the course will strive for objectivity and balance and will encourage the evaluation of differing points of view, including not only the competing views of Israelis and Arabs but also the important differences existing within Israel and the Arab world. The instructor for the course has attended university and subsequently conducted research in both the Arab world and Israel, having spent over four years in the former and almost three years in the latter. He visits the area frequently and regularly collaborates with Israeli and Arab scholars.

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POLSCI 354(454). Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/354/001.nsf

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most dynamic and complex regions, and is of growing importance on the global stage. This course offers an introduction to the region for advanced undergraduates; it is also an introduction to some of the broader political and economic issues in the developing world.

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POLSCI 359(459) / CAAS 449. African Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Anne Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/359/001.nsf

Introduces the study of African politics. By way of background the course briefly discusses government in pre-colonial Africa and patterns of change during the slave trades, the trade in "legitimate commodities" in the era of the industrial revolution, and colonialism. The main units focus on the policy choices of newly independent countries, the "second liberation" of the 1990s, and contemporary challenges to state-building. The course addresses general questions about development policy, regime change, constitution making, electoral politics, civil conflict, and humanitarian intervention in the context of Africa. Reading includes material drawn from political science, economics, anthropology, history, and law, as well as several novels and plays by African authors. Graduate students may take for course credit under POLSCI 470 with additional reading assignments and additional, separate meetings with the instructor.

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POLSCI 360(460). Problems in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/360/001.nsf

This course provides an in-depth look at theories of international relations, their logic, and their application to understand individual events.

The topics covered include the causes of war, negotiation, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international institutions and cooperation.

Because strategic interaction is central to world politics, the student will be introduced to game theory — a mathematical theory of strategic interaction and its application to international politics. The game theory models to be presented in the course require only high school algebra for their solution. A series of cases are used to illustrate the application of the theories to specific situations in world politics.

Course Requirements and Grading: The course will be graded on the basis of weekly problem sets, two short papers (1000 words), and a final examination on the last day of class. There will not be problem sets on the weeks when the papers are due and the week of the final exam.

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POLSCI 369(469). Politics of International Economic Relations.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude C Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/369/001.nsf

With the end of the Cold War and the acceleration of international economic integration, political scientists interested in international relations have increasingly turned their attention to the politics of global trade and finance. This area of study, known as international political economy (or simply IPE), focuses on the familiar connections between power and wealth, states and markets, and economics and politics in order to gain a better understanding of the political underpinnings of the global economy as well as the influences that international economics has on national and international politics. Are free trade and multipolarity compatible? Does economic globalization undermine democracy and popular sovereignty? Along these lines, an important focus of this course is whether the institutions that currently govern international economic activity are robust enough to survive important political and economic changes that are currently taking place in the world. For example, we will consider whether the domestic political coalitions that have traditionally supported free trade are breaking up as a result of increased international capital mobility and whether the international cooperation necessary to manage the global economy can survive significant changes in the international distribution of power.

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POLSCI 372(472). International Security Affairs.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine a number of international security issues that actively involve the U.S. The course will be divided into two basic sections. In the first half of the academic term, we will focus on U.S. arms control and nuclear weapon policies with topics such as nuclear proliferation, ballistic missile defense, and nuclear arms control with Russia is covered. In the second half of the academic term, our attention will turn to the analysis of the international politics of civil wars. Topics to be covered will include the causes of civil war, when do states intervene into civil wars, and what impact does outside intervention have on civil wars, including U.S. policy over the past decade. We will conclude this section with a look at some of the legal and ethical questions raised by international intervention into civil wars. The course requirements include: (1) Two in-class written exams, and each exam is worth 25% of the final grade; (2) All students are required to write a research paper that is worth 50% of the final grade. The research paper will be written in three stages over the course of the term. Students may elect to sign up for the upper-level writing requirement based on the research paper that is written over the course of the term.

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POLSCI 380 / ENVIRON 312 / NRE 312. Environmental Politics and Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry George Rabe (brabe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Environment 312.001.

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POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 — Environmental Politics and Policies. [3 credits]. Meets with ENVIRON 302.002.

Instructor(s): Walter Rosenbaum

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you wondered why:

  • Americans spend more time and money on environmental lawsuits than any other nation on earth?
  • Western Europe supports a global treaty to control climate warming and the U.S. does not?
  • Eastern Europe has the worst pollution problems in the world and the worst time cleaning it up?
  • Developing countries buy American pollution technology but often distrust Western environmental science?

These, and other differences in national styles of environmental policymaking, are the focus of this new course. Contrasting national approaches to environmental policy, and the reasons why nations differ so greatly in environmental policies and priorities, are explored. Environmental policymaking in the United States, Western Europe, Eastern Europe/Russia and Mainland China are the centerpiece studies. Particular attention is given to the interaction between national resource base, science/technology infrastructures, and governmental decision-making. Guest speakers familiar with these different styles of national policymaking from government, regulatory agencies, and the private sector will also make presentations. Prerequisite is a basic course in American government, comparative government, international relations or equivalent preparation.

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POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 — Diplomacy and Negotiation. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Zeev Maoz

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/389/002.nsf

This course reviews the theory and practice of international negotiation. On the theoretical level, we discuss major approaches to the study of diplomacy and negotiation including classical diplomatic approaches, game theory, psychological approaches, and mediation-related approaches. These approaches are applied to four historical cases of international negotiations: (1) the Hitler crises, 1933-1941, (2) the Vietnam negotiations, 1968-1973, (3) the Arab-Israeli peace process, 1973-2003, and (4) the 1990-91 Gulf Crisis and the 2002-03 Iraq Crisis multilateral diplomacy. The course culminates in a simulation of multilateral international negotiations.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 003 — Europe's New Politics — From New Social Movements to Political Ideology. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Gayil Talshir

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is the vision of the 'good society' today? How do we bring about social change? What are the boundaries of the 'Political'? The course traces the evolution of New Politics in Europe since the 1960s asking whether the emergence of the New Social Movements have led to a new kind of politics, encompassing a new worldview, or have they merged into the established political system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the Chair. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 395 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / HISTORY 332 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rees/395/001.nsf

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 407. Marxism and 20th-Century Radicalism.

Theory

Section 001 — The Soviet Experiment.

Instructor(s): Gordon N Harding (nharding@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course could be subtitled "The Soviet Experiment"; not because it is a course on Soviet politics, but because it will focus on the evolution and implications of Marxist/communist ideas.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/409/001.nsf

This course offers a chronological survey of some central contributions to contemporary political thought. Its premise is that 20th-century political thinkers have offered us different (a) vocabularies to understand modern political world and (b) arguments for why and how we should try to change that world. Beginning with the German sociologist Max Weber and ending with the South African novelist J. M. Coetzee, the course draws from contributions outside political theory proper. Since most of the 20th-century political thought consists of developments of and reactions to the 19th-century legacies of liberalism and Marxism, familiarity with the key theories in modern political thought is strongly recommended. The course is writing-intensive.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 432. Law and Public Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marvin Krislov

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/432/001.nsf

This course will focus on the ways our courts do and do not intervene in politics and the political process, both on the federal and state level. Topics to be covered include: the regulation of voting, voting rights, the Census, Congressional reapportionment, campaign finance, and the selection (or election) of federal and state judges. There will be a team research project, midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course studies "empirical democratic theory," that is, democracy not as an abstract principle, but as a reality. We will cover the history of the American party system, with a special emphasis on the state of Michigan.

Beginning with the pre-Civil War period, the readings and lectures will treat the shifts in public opinion that give rise to new popular movements and pressure groups, which then modify or destroy the contemporary party system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term with a supervising faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

POLSCI 493. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (POLSCI 494), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Open to senior honors concentrators only. Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a member of the Political Science faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 — European Socialism: The Ambiguous Legacy.

Instructor(s): Gordon Harding (nharding@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and concentration in political science. Prerequisites enforced at registration. Primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course explores the principal disputes in the development of European socialism. These refer not only to the means to realise socialism (revolution or reform, through political struggle or industrial warfare) but also to what we are and how we know our world. We will pay particular attention to a perennial controversy about whether the goals of socialism are autonomous activity and freedom (anarchists and libertarians) or whether it ought to concern itself more with ending exploitation and establishing economic security (marxists and social democrats). Following the introductory lecture course, the course will switch to student-led seminars and will be assessed exclusively by essay and seminar presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 001 — Political Participation.

Instructor(s): Jacob Winfield Bowers (jwbowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar deals with various approaches to understanding why ordinary people get involved in politics, in both electoral (e.g., voting, campaigning) and non-electoral (e.g., contacting officials, volunteering, protest) activities. The course is organized around several of the major studies of political participation in the U.S.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 002 — Politics of Higher Education.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/496/002.nsf

The objectives of this seminar are to frame and analyze pressing political issues facing higher education in the United States today, to understand their historical evolution, and to project how these issues may affect universities of the future. The course begins by considering the external political environment of the U.S. research university: public perceptions of and pressures on higher education, sources of revenue and relationships with state and federal governments. Next we consider the internal political environment of universities: the allocation of resources across priorities, definitions of fields of study and service to various constituencies. Then, we focus on several specific domains and the external and internal politics of each: the health center, intercollegiate athletics, and affirmative action. The course concludes with a look into the future of higher education.

Requirements for the course include weekly readings, attendance and participation in seminar discussions, one or more short discussion papers, participation in a group briefing on an assigned topic, and a substantial paper on an original research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 003 — American Political Development.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/496/003.nsf

The course has two goals:

  1. First, it will examine this transformation of southern politics. In doing so, it will explore both how national politics affected the South, and, in turn, how southern politics continues to shape national politics, including U.S. social policy, race relations, and the partisan control of Congress and the presidency.
  2. Second, the course will use this investigation to grapple with larger questions that preoccupy students of comparative politics, including:

    • How do various social identities become politically salient in ethnically and racially diverse societies?
    • What sustains authoritarian regimes, and when are insurgents able to challenge them effectively and build democracies?
    • What special challenges do ethnically and racially plural societies face when democratizing?
    • How do issues such as retrospective justice and the politics of symbols complicate, or facilitate, democracy-building?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 004 — Foreign Perspectives on American Politics.

Instructor(s): Stephen Brooks (sabrooks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the earliest years of European colonization in what would become the United States, foreigners have read various meanings into the American experience. America and the American experience constitute one of the defining poles of modern history, a fact that is attested to by the enormous volume of writings on American politics and society by foreigners.

This course will examine foreign perspectives, past and present, on several important features of American political life. These include race relations, wealth and class, political culture, and America's role in the world. We will cover some of the classic writings by foreigners on these themes, including those of Tocqueville, Bryce, Laski, Myrdal, and Beauvoir. The second half of the course will be devoted to more contemporary foreign perspectives on American politics, based on writings and other media from Britain, Canada, France, other European societies, and the Middle East.

Students will be required to write a 12-page paper related to one of the themes of this course. Weekly participation is an essential component of the course, worth 25% of the grade. There will be about 30-40 pages of reading per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 001 — Government & Politics of Korea.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/497/001.nsf

Surveys the politics and policies of contemporary South and North Korea, their interaction, and the roles of the great powers in Korea. Examines core political institutions, salient patterns of political interaction, and the major events and developments that have shaped ROK and DPRK political development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 002 — Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Politics.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines interactions between ethnicity, nationalism, and politics. We shall analyze how and why nations have arisen and have become the focus of people's loyalties, and how states interact with multiethnic and multinational societies. We analyze devices and schemes used by states in various parts of the world to deal with ethnicity and ethnic groups. Relationships among race, ethnicity, and religion will be studied. The course concludes with recent reevaluations of the concepts of identity and citizenship and some attempts — once again — to look beyond states as the predominant mode of organizing societies. Several short papers and a substantial research paper are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 003 — St. Petersburg and Russian Politics.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

St. Petersburg is used as a mirror on Russian politics. As part of the University's celebration of the 300th anniversary of St. Petersburg, this seminar will use St. Petersburg/Leningrad as a focal point to discuss key issues in Soviet and Russian politics since 1917. Emphasis will be placed on Leningrad in Soviet politics, how mass attitudes in St. Petersburg differ from other Russians, on the relations between Moscow and Russia's regions, especially St. Petersburg; on the mafia, and on St. Petersburg as a career step for Putin and members of his government.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 004 — European Electoral Politics.

Instructor(s): Orit Kedar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/497/004.nsf

This course will discuss issues in current European electoral politics. The focus will be mostly thematic, although the issues addressed will be discussed in the context of the region. Examples of the topics discussed are: old and new political cleavages, green politics, economic voting, voter attitudes toward the EU, territorial parties, and regionalism, although additional topics might be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 005 — Religion and Politics.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines historical and contemporary experiences of religion and politics. Cases include movements, events, and national or cultural experiences of conflict or change drawn from the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the Islamic world. Explanations for these experiences will be drawn from a range of theories and discussions in the social sciences with particular emphasis on theories of secularization, social capital, social movements, and discussions of ideology and conflict.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 001 — State Making.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will concern ourselves in this course with questions of the impact of militarized conflict, and preparation for militarized conflict, on the political and economic processes known as state making. A growing literature on this topic emerges from comparative politics, world politics, and history. By necessity then, our course will be multidisciplinary, hopefully drawing the best from each discipline. Students will be expected to attend every seminar meeting, having read and thought about the material assigned each week. Students failing to participate will find their grades suffering, as a sizeable proportion of the course grade will be based on participation and attendance. In addition to the seminars, students will be expected to write a long term paper. Additionally, there will be a cumulative final exam. The breakdown of grades is twenty-five percent for seminar participation, twenty-five percent for the final exam, and fifty percent for the paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 002 — International Terrorism and Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD).

Instructor(s): Raymond Tanter (rtanter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/498/002.nsf

International terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) are twin topics of this seminar. Regarding terrorism, the focus is on the American–led war on terrorism. With respect to WMD proliferation, the emphasis is on rogue regime change in general and regime change in Baghdad in particular.

Rational choice and prospect theory provide theoretical expectations for comparison with behavior of three sets of actors: rogue state leaders, such as Saddam Hussein; free lance terrorists like Osama bin Laden, who take advantage of failed states and often collude with state sponsors of terrorism; and suicide (homicide) bombers who act at the behest of terrorist organizations.

  • To what degree are Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden, and suicide bombers rational opportunists?
  • To the degree they are rational, they can be deterred or coerced; but without targetable assets, strategic influence is difficult.
  • To what extent are Saddam, Osama, and bombers paranoid victims?
  • To the degree they are paranoid, they are less subject to deterrence and coercion.

Rational Opportunists also manipulate beliefs and feelings of paranoid victims, e.g., consider Osama bin Laden, Hamas, and Palestinian Islamic Jihad as rational opportunist organizations that send suicide bombers off to their deaths for strategic purposes.

Rational Choice principles

  • Close windows of opportunity with power and commitment.
  • Successful deterrence and coercion are possible if target acts to secure gains rather avoid losses.
  • Gain seekers stand in front of windows of opportunity waiting to jump.
  • If there is credible commitment to resist risk-averse challengers with targetable assets, then successful deterrence and coercion are likely.
  • War comes from actions of power–hungry, error–free, cold–hearted mercenaries not checked by capability and credible commitment.
  • World War II is the paradigm for rational choice — confront Hitler to deter aggression
  • No Trespass and Warning signs are to deter crimes of rational opportunists.

Bounded Choice (Prospect Theory)

  • Open basements of fear with reassurance
  • Failed deterrence and coercion are because target acting to avoid losses rather than secure gains.
  • Threats are inappropriate for fearful individuals; indeed, threats may backfire and produce noncompliant behavior.
  • If those in front of window of opportunity are mercenaries, then actors in basement of fear are paranoids, unable to make even limited rational calculations.
  • Escalation through miscalculation: Expect counterproductive aspects of threats when used with interlocking fears.
  • World War I is the template for prospect theory: Reassure the threatened to avoid preemptive strikes and preventive wars.
  • War results from the actions of fear–driven, mistake–ridden, risk–prone paranoids.
  • Welcome signs function to reassure actors in basements of fear.

Prospect Theory Principles

  • Loss aversion, endowment effect, effort justification
  • Loss aversion: Deterrence and coercion are problematic if target frames situation in domain of loss rather than gain.
  • Endowment effect: Deterrence and coercion are problematic if target overvalues current possessions; individuals endow possessions with value in excess of what they paid for them.
  • Effort justification: Deterrence and coercion are difficult if target overvalues because effort to acquire goods: The more effort it takes to obtain a set of goods, the more individuals value those items.
  • When loss aversion, endowment effect, and effort justification operate in the same direction, deterrence and coercion are of dubious validity.
  • People desire gains less than they fear losses.
  • If goal is gain, then people are risk averse.
  • If purpose is loss avoidance, then people are risk acceptant.
  • Threats appropriate when people are in domain of gain rather than in realm of deprivation.

At issue: How to determine the dominion for a particular actor, which is very important for student papers for this seminar. Students are to write case studies applying rational choice and prospect theory to one of three sets of actors: rogue state leaders, freelance terrorists, and suicide bombers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 003 — War in World Politics.

Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a senior seminar, admission by permission of instructor only, twenty students maximum, in which we will examine all three types of war going back to the Congress of Vienna: inter-state, intra-state, and extra-state. The emphasis is not so much on the conduct or the consequences of the many wars, but on the putative "causes", and we will treat the search for such explanations in a scientific, quantitative manner. Three written assignments and no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 004 — Transatlantic Relations.

Instructor(s): Martin Thunert

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For most of the cold war period, transatlantic relations produced the illusion that present Atlantic arrangements are quasi-natural and that wise policy consists of making existing frameworks more tolerable. But the end of the cold war in combination with technological revolutions, economic globalization and new security threats (terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, etc.) have erased most of the certainties that governed the transatlantic relationship between Europe and North America in the post-World War II era. In addition to analyzing transatlantic relations on several levels (political, military, economic and cultural), and in its bilateral and multilateral dimensions, the course will examine whether North American and European views of the world, i.e., the perception of future challenges (opportunities and threats) as well as strategies to deal with security issues as well as technological, societal and economic change diverge or converge after the end of the cold war.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 560 / PUBPOL 560. Foreign Policy and the Management of International Relations.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Waltz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 560.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Van Houweling

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Hall

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Graduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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