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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 7:04 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/100/001.nsf

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology. The second is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 012.

Instructor(s): George Mason (gpmason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/100/012.nsf

The course is designed to acquaint students with the basic theories and methods used by sociologists. Emphasis will be placed on such concepts as inequality, socialization, gender roles, social class, culture, and deviance. The purpose of this course is an introduction to the analysis of human society from a sociological perspective. As well, the course will include an introduction to the principles and basic concepts of sociological analysis. Students will be introduced to sociological theory and will be expected to develop critical analytical techniques beyond the level of description. Students will be expected to progress from individual based understanding to a broader sociological understanding.

In order that students are introduced to the subject matter of sociology and the methods to study society, this course will be divided into four distinct sections. The first section of the course will include an examination of the nature of social life and the methodology of sociologists. The second section of this course will investigate the individual within society. The third section will include an examination of contemporary institutions in society. The fourth section will examine the structure of society including social change and inequality. Students will be introduced to sociology in an attempt to guide critical explanation and analysis of contemporary society in the United States, North America and throughout the world. Finally, students will be exposed to aspects of society where social change has occurred through individual action.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/100/023.nsf

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology. The second is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001 — Social Inequality: Race, Labor, and Education in Detroit.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 300 or 401. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through SOC 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/102/001.nsf

The relationship between social inequalities — in economic resources and educational opportunities, in status and respect, and in legal rights and political power — and differences in race and class has long been a central interest of sociologists. This course introduces students to sociology as a mode of inquiry by exploring how sociologists and others analyze the evolution of race, class, and social inequality in the metro Detroit area from the 1920s to the present. We ask what causes social inequalities of the sort we find, why they evolve as they do, and how they affect individuals, communities, and the nation. Up to 12 students taking SOC 102 may link with one of the community service/learning projects organized by Project Community (SOC 389) focusing on Detroit schools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 002 — Class, Race, Gender, and Modernity.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the sociological study of inequality through an analysis of three of its fundamental dimensions — class, race, and gender. The course will explore how each of the three dimensions of inequality is related to the development of modern capitalist society as described by Marx and Weber. The course will provide an introduction to basic concepts in class analysis, to contemporary issues in feminist theories of gender, and to recent work on the social construction of race. It will also trace both the similarities and differences among the three dimensions, their relationship to one another and to the underlying dynamics of capitalist modernity. Texts include; Richard Sennet and Jonathan Cobb; The Hidden Injuries of Class. Eric Olin Wright, Class Counts; R.W. Connel, Gender and Power; Oyeronke, Oyewumi, The Invention of Women; David Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness; Ron Takaki, Iron Cages: Race and Culture in Nineteenth Century America; as well as selected readings from Marx and Weber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 003 — Democracy, Diversity & Community.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity as we explore the possibilities for building community in a democratic society. It also will look at the intersection of gender, class, sexual orientation, religion, and race in this context. Students also will explore issues of civic engagement and community-building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power, conflict and competing social interests. Students are expected to be active participants in class discussion and will be encouraged to bring in personal experience and perspective to enrich the discussion of theoretical readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 004 — Transforming America: Immigrants Then and Now.

Instructor(s): Pedraza

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common yet truest statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American Immigrant experience, that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans.

Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the South to the North of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia.

At all times, our effort will be to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. This course is a First–Year Seminar, limited to 25 entering students at the University. As such, it will be run as a seminar, involving a fair amount of discussion and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 110 / SI 110. Introduction to Information Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Frost (rfrost@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.si.umich.edu/~rfrost/courses/SI110/SI110Syl.htm

The vaunted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, 'Net games, and dotcoms. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize those lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information. At the School of Information, we take pride in our tradition, inherited from librarianship, of "user-centeredness" and public access. For this reason, not only will you, the user of this course, be given unusual attention, but intellectually, we will approach information technology from the perspective of end-users and their concerns.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-telescoping and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones and libraries?), to the practical (what are the basic architectures of computing and networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to understand the politics, economics, and culture of the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of other academic fields. Topics will include:

  • problems of intellectual property (copyrights and patents) in the Digital Age
  • the culture of open-source software, coding, hacking, and innovation
  • the implications of databases and Internet activity tracking on privacy
  • government accountability in the age of e-mail and digital documents
  • the "new economy" as business models and e-commerce strategies
  • post-9/11 security and surveillance measures and what they mean for the Internet
  • how the new information environment is organized, and how search engines work
  • the implications of recent Internet filtering requirements for libraries
  • and, of course, the basic structures of computers and the Internet

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 — Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Mich. Union.

SOC 195. Principles in Sociology (Honors).

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students admitted to the Honors Program, or other first- and second-year students with a grade point average of at least 3.2. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 202 or 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is not granted for both SOC 195 and SOC 100, 202, or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As a discipline, Sociology has an extraordinarily rich canon of classical thought. Major thinkers such as Karl Marx, Émile Durkheim, and Max Weber grappled with the key problems of modernity, including the dramatic rise of capitalism and colonialism; new forms of social inequality; the advent of bureaucracy and democracy; the diminished role of religion and people's fears of what the loss of ultimate meaning might mean for their lives. The legacies of modernity are still very much with us. This course introduces students to the study of modernity and sociology through the lens of its major nineteenth and early twentieth-century thinkers. It also delves into the wide variety of contemporary writings on social life that are informed by the classical sociological tradition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Mason (gpmason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/210/001.nsf

The course is designed to introduce students of the social sciences to the basic statistical methods. Various statistics will be introduced and students will learn how to analyze and understand social situations. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of statistics or mathematics beyond that of college stream high school education. Students will be introduced to frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, cross-tabulation, hypothesis testing, regression, chi-square, and other statistical techniques.

This course introduces to the student three important aspects of quantitative research. First, the methods in which data collection is conducted by researchers such as opinion polls, surveys, experiments, and sampling. Second, the description of the data collection including graphical and numerical procedures for summarizing and describing a data set. Third, the ways in which researchers use data to make decisions, predictions and draw inferences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 212 / GERMAN 212. Sports and Society.

Section 001 — Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century.

There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century, whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one — soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

In answering these questions, the course will proceed in the following manner: In the first section, we will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports. In this segment, we will see how this transformation was identical in every industrial society and should thus be seen as a fine gauge of modernity: These disorganized games become bureaucratized, ordered, codified, rule-bound by the elites and upper middle class segments of industrial societies between 1860 and 1900. However, these games, though now codified and routinized, still remain part of leisure activities of a small privileged group in society. Once, however, they become embraced by the male, industrial working class, they enter the realm of professionalism, of vocation, of commodification. The industrial working class is the subject that leads these amateur games towards professional sports and thus to an integral part of modern mass culture.

In the second part, we will look at how similar and congruous the development in the United States was with this trajectory, yet how the content emerged so differently. We will dwell briefly on what makes the United States similar and what renders it different vis-à-vis other advanced industrial democracies.

The third segment will look in detail at the four North American culturally hegemonic team sports: baseball, football, basketball in the United States; ice hockey in Canada.

The fourth part will analyze the development of soccer — tellingly called "football" by the rest of the world — in England.

The last section will look at the world in the context of globalization and ask whether new structures might be emerging that will challenge the old; or whether these new developments will exist alongside the old in a much less significant and culturally powerful manner.

Course Requirements: Two five-page papers on the course readings during the term; and a take-home final at the end of the course during the examination period

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 222 / RCSSCI 222. Strategies in Social Interaction: An Introduction to Game Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 231. Investigating Social and Demographic Change in America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William H Frey (billf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. Restricted to first- and second-year students.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This computer–based course for first year and sophomores allows participants to investigate how major social, economic, and political changes have affected the demographic structure of the U.S. population in the past four decades. What does this mean for issues related to race, gender, and inequality? How do you fit into the picture? We will address questions such as: How greatly have Black-white income differences become reduced since the 1960s? Is the middle class shrinking? To what extent has the traditional family disintegrated? Will women continue to earn less than men? Will Generation X fare better than the Baby Boomers?

Through readings, lectures, and exercises on the WEB and Windows machines, this computer-based course you will learn how to examine such questions using U.S. Census data and simple statistical analyses. In the process you will come to understand how major dimensions of the nation's social and demographic structure have changed from 1950 to the present. The course involves individual and team exercises as well as two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Mason (gpmason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/303/001.nsf

This course in race and ethnicity will focus on social explanations of inequality and its social construction within the United States and throughout the world–with a particular focus on the difficulties arising from the categorization and stratification of people within minority groups. As well, students will be introduced to a sociology of inequality and the methods to study inequality. This will include an examination of the social history and social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States. However, the class will go beyond examining visibly different ethnic groups and will take a broader and comparative view of race and ethnicity to examine the categorical creation of the "Other" and "White Privilege" in the United States.

This course will be divided into five distinct sections. The first section of the course will include a discussion of the definitions and concepts related to the study of minority groups. The second section will examine the structure of ethnicity and the social construction of race. The third section of this course will review the social history and social change of race and ethnicity. The fourth section will examine the social consequences of stratification based on class, race, and gender. Finally, the fifth section will conclude with an examination of the political, social, and economic inequality of contemporary society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence McGinn

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/305/001.nsf

An introduction to various problems in the analysis of social organization and their treatment in the works of eminent figures in sociological thought. Classical theorists such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Simmel are studied, as well as contemporary sociologists. The course asks how these thinkers understand the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization and how they account for social change. In the context of this analysis, students are introduced to various accounts and uses of such theoretical concepts as structure, function, norm, stratification, social control, deviance, etc. Attention is also given to the way in which the organizational concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer S Barber

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/310/001.nsf

This course will introduce you to a range of basic research methods used by sociologists, including surveys, experiments, unstructured interviews, focus groups, diaries/calendar methods, observation, and archival/historical methods. The course also addresses causality and reasoning in social science research and exposes students to important methodological issues in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 315(415). Economic Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: introductory economics, sociology, or political science. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Economic sociology is concerned with the social bases of economic behavior. It is one of the newest but most vibrant areas of sociology. This course presents an overview of the field. We begin with a discussion of the differences between sociological and economic approaches, followed by samples from the classic works of Adam Smith, Polanyi, Marx, and Weber. We then discuss the rise of the large corporation, focusing on both economic and sociological accounts. Following this unit, we move progressively from the internal workings of the firm toward macro-level discussions of the relation between business and society. Topics covered include issues of corporate control, the social meaning of money, production and financial markets, mergers and divestitures, the role of national cultures in shaping economic behavior, and fundamental questions about the distribution of income and wealth.

Prerequisites: At least one prior course in both sociology and economics or permission of the instructor.

For the most recent syllabus, see http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mizruchi/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 320 / PSYCH 310. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. SOC 122 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/310/001.nsf

See Psychology 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Requires application/permission of instructor. Contact instructor or website www.umich.edu/~igrc for application information.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

See Psychology 311.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 323 / CAAS 321. African American Social Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 321.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 325. Sociology of Service Learning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course is only for students facilitating SOC 389. Contact Project Community (763-3548) for permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Course is only for students facilitating Soc 389. Contact Proj Comm (763-3548) for permission to register.

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociologists approach the family as an institutionalized form of social organization, system of social reproduction, and ideological construct. This course introduces students to each of these perspectives, beginning with comparative historical study of "the family" in ancient Greece and 20th century United States. We then investigate the development of Western family organization in relation to the society's overall economic and political structure. This exploration provides a framework for more in-depth consideration of the multiplicity of family dynamics in the U.S., emphasizing the roles of race and class in divergent family forms, parenting relations, and the changing nature of childhood. Next we consider the family as an economic unit of production, the gendered organization of household labor, and the realities of family life in relation to the imagined 1950s family ideal. Other topics include the nature of familial versus friendship bonds, the role of family life in producing gender and sexual identities, domestic violence, gay families, teen pregnancy, and the role of state policy in helping to legitimate particular family forms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 368(468). Criminology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/368/001.nsf

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime and social control. After reviewing the definition and nature of crime in both classic and contemporary theories, we explore the major theoretical perspectives on the causes of crime and compare their ability to explain criminal activity by considering case studies drawn from books, film, and current events. Some of the specific topics we will explore include crime and policing in local communities; family and cultural influences on crime; the contours of criminal careers; race, class, and gender as they relate to crime in America; and historical trends in violent crime.

Requirements generally include two in–class exams, two papers, and class participation, although these requirements are subject to change. No prerequisite or background in sociology is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Up to four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/pc

SOC 389 is known as Project Community. Students combine three to four hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete weekly reflective journal assignments, a midterm paper/project, and a final paper/project.

Questions and override requests must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

All students must view the web site: PRIOR to registering for a SOC 389/Project Community section.

NOTE: All sections of SOC 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, shelters, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description on website.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office.

If a particular section is full, please e-mail Sean de Four (seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

EDUCATION

Section 100 - THURSTON ELEMENTARY ENRICHMENT. (3 credits).
Section 101 - ANN ARBOR: PITTSFIELD ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 102 - AMERICA READS: ISSUES IN LITERACY. (2 credits).
Section 103 - DETROIT: LATINO FAMILY SERVICES: AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 104 - DETROIT: HARDING ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 105 - DETROIT: VETAL SCHOOL. (3 credits).
Section 106 - GUIDANCE CENTER: AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS. (3 credits).
Section 107 - SCARLETT MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 108 - KCP: COMMUNITY OUTREACH. (3 credits).
Section 110 - FEMINIST MENTORS. (3 credits).
Section 111 - GLOBAL OUTREACH: EDUCATING KIDS ABOUT THE WORLD. (3 credits).

HEALTH

Section 200 - UM HOSPITAL: MOTT/WOMEN'S. (3 credits).
Section 201 - UM HOSPITAL: ADULT SERVICES. (3 credits).
Section 202 - ELDERLY: SUNRISE ASSISTED LIVING. (3 credits).
Section 203 - HIV/AIDS EDUCATION (HARC). (3 credits).
Section 204 - FULL CIRCLE: MENTAL HEALTH. (3 credits).

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS

Section 300 - SOS: AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 301 - SAFE HOUSE: WOMEN. (4 credits).
Section 302 - SAFE HOUSE: CHILDREN. (4 credits).
Section 303 - OZONE HOUSE: TEEN SHELTER. (4 credits).
Section 304 - SOS: PARENTS AS TEACHERS PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 305 - HOMELESS OUTREACH PROGRAM (SAWC). (3 credits).

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Section 400 - JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER: WRITING TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 402 - JAIL: CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 403 - W. WAYNE (women) CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 404 - ADRIAN (men) PRISON CREATIVE WRITING. (3 credits).
Section 405 - ADRIAN (men) PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 406 - WESTERN WAYNE (women) PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 407 - JAIL: DIALOGUE ON MULTICULTURALISM. (3 credits).

MICHIGAN COMMUNITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM (MCSP)/LUCY

Section 500 - MCSP: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TUTORING: NORTHSIDE. (3 credits).
Section 501 - MCSP: MENTORING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS: PEACE NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER. (3 credits).
Section 502 - MCSP: MIDDLE SCHOOL HOMEWORK CLUB: FORSYTHE. (3 credits).
Section 503 - LUCY: TBA. (3 credits).

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Section 600 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: WARREN CONNOR DEVELOPMENT CORP. (4 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SOC 392 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / HISTORY 332 / POLSCI 395. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rees/395/001.nsf

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SOC 398. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in Sociology. SOC 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (SOC 399), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a second course of a three–course sequence (Sociology 397, 398, 399) designed to guide the students through the completion of their Honors thesis. The focus of this seminar will be on collection and analysis of data for the thesis. Time will be spent every week sharing research experiences and problems, and doing problem-solving.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 426 / POLSCI 339 / ASIAN 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 339.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will ask two central questions about gender relations — Why is there gender inequality? and What are women's experiences of that inequality? We will examine many (often contradictory) answers to these questions. The course will be broken into four sections — the State; Work; Family; and Body/Sexuality — that represent the main areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression. We will look for answers to a wide range of questions that will shed light on our basic question about how gender inequality is constructed and maintained. Some specific questions we will ask are: How do women and men decide who does the housework? Why do MacDonalds' workers think cooking is a man's job? Is mothering political? Is breastfeeding? When is rape a war crime? How do race, class, and sexuality interact with gender? Do cosmetics, shaving, and dieting maintain gender inequality?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 452. Law and Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Law and social psychology intersect around issues of norms and justice, and this will be a focus of this course. We shall examine the concepts of norms, responsibility, and justice in both a social psychological and legal context and will look at how findings from social psychology, which is a science, bear on issues that arise in the law, a normative system of social control. We will look at legal processes in general and will consider the roles of different actors in legal systems: civil parties; criminal victims; lawyers; judges; and juries. Focus will be given to the central process of legal systems: the trial; jury selection; eyewitness testimony; the presentation of evidence; jury deliberations; and so on.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 — Labor and Global Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/460/001.nsf

Economic globalization is one of the most powerful drivers of social change in the contemporary world. This course asks what economic globalization is, why it takes the form that it does, and how it affects the lives and livelihoods of the more vulnerable working people in the bottom half of the income distributions of the poor countries of the global South and the rich countries of the global North. We survey the range of economic realities faced by the men, women and children who labor for their income in these locations within their economies. We consider the structural changes in those realities that have occurred over the last quarter century, and the causes of those changes. We consider the kinds of reforms to the existing, neoliberal model of global economic regulation demanded by workers' organizations and their allies, and debates over the likely consequences of these changes. Finally, we consider whether (and if so, how) the U.S. labor movement and its allies can increase their political power enough to make the U.S. government an active contributor to the global economic regulation reforms favored by organized labor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 465 / PSYCH 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although all human groups define some actions and those who engage in them as "deviant", exactly what and who constitutes deviance varies socially, historically and cross-culturally. This course is an introductory sociological analysis of behaviors and identities morally condemned in American society. Special emphasis is directed to the relationship between values, institutions, activities, and identities seen as "deviant" and those thought "conventional." Among the topics explored are the social construction of deviance designations; the relationship of definitions of deviance to social spheres of power; types and processes of social control; the development and management of deviant identities; deviant subcultures; the legislation of morality; the medicalization of deviance; and the patterning of deviance with respect to gender, race, and class. Various theoretical perspectives are examined in the context of such specific areas as sexual practices, mental disorder, gender and sexual identities, drugs and drinking, prostitution, sexual violence, homosexuality, transgenderism, and the deviance of so-called "respectable" individuals and institutions of society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 472 / PSYCH 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/381/001.nsf

See Psychology 381.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/475/001.nsf

This introductory course on Medical Sociology examines the underpinning concepts of health and illness within a social context, as well as pertinent health care issues in today's society. The objective of this course is to provide students with a central framework of sociological theories, perspectives, methods, terminology, and historical overviews in order to conduct sociological analyses and research on health care issues and medical practices. Topics will include the socio-historical perspective of medicine, epidemiology, the intersection of sociological variables (gender, race, class, and age) with medical issues, social stress, health and illness behavior, healing options, doctor-patient relationships, the role of nurses, physician assistants, and midwives, hospitals and health care delivery systems, health maintenance organizations, as well as the medicalization of America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 — Detroit: Its History and Future. Meets 10/28-11/6 with field trip on Sat. 11/1/03. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=October 29).

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there — a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit — the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

This section will meet on Tuesday afternoon, October 28th and Thursday afternoon, October 30th at 4 PM in 3416 Mason Hall. Saturday November 1st will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday — November 4 and Thursday — November 6– afternoons.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.

Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)

The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15.16.

One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for about $ 14.40.

Chapters will be assigned from the several books listed and that these will be available from the University Library's on-line reserve system.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

To obtain credit for this course, it will be necessary to attend every one of the four class meetings and the all-Saturday tour of Detroit.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


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