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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 6:49 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


Changes to Registration Procedures for Elementary Language Courses*

All students should be advised of the following changes in the Department of Romance Languages that may affect how they enroll in courses for Fall 2003.

  1. No waitlists. We have removed waitlists from all Romance Languages courses, which means that spaces may become available in all classes throughout the pre-registration process. If a particular section of a course is full, you should continue to monitor Wolverine Access because spaces may become available.
  2. New sections will open in most courses. The office staff will be monitoring enrollment and opening new sections of most elementary language courses.
  3. Contact the office for further assistance. If all sections of a course are full, please stop by 4108 MLB or e-mail rll.permissions@umich.edu with your Fall 2003 class schedule and the course you need to enroll in.

* Elementary language courses include: FRENCH 101, FRENCH 102, FRENCH 103, FRENCH 231, FRENCH 232, FRENCH 235, ITALIAN 101, ITALIAN 102, ITALIAN 103, ITALIAN 231, ITALIAN 232, SPANISH 101, SPANISH 102, SPANISH 103, SPANISH 231, SPANISH 232, SPANISH 275 and SPANISH 276.

Further information is available from: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html


SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, written and oral exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 101. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 103. SPANISH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed SPANISH 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in SPANISH 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect SPANISH 103 if they have completed the equivalent of SPANISH 101 elsewhere. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 102.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing SPANISH 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 111. First Special Reading Course.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 101, 102, or 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 111 (and its subsequent course, SPANISH 112) is designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students a grade of B or better in SPANISH 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:

  • Visión y Voz, Galloway-Labarca (Wiley). (Students placed in 231 have the option to buy the customized version for SPANISH 231 that contains only the last two units of the book, workbook and laboratory manual).
  • SPANISH 231. Course pack. Primis custom publishing (McGraw-Hill Co.)
  • Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/232/002.nsf

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course, and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials.

Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

TEXTS:

  1. Required:
    • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Course pack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments
  2. Recommended:
    • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of six cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the three required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
    • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
    • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 023 — Literatura fantástica.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

This course will focus on the discussion and examination of fantastic literature and magical realism in contemporary Latin American literature. The principle objectives will be to develop an understanding of the origins, themes, methods, and purposes of fantastic literature through selected readings of literature and criticism. Texts will include short stories and a short novel by Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortázar, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. Students will be required to purchase a course pack, a grammar reference text, and a reader. In addition to the focus on the development of fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, important functional aspects of language will also be addressed. Evaluations will be based on class participation, course exams, an oral exam, homework, in-class activities, and a final course portfolio. Special emphasis will be placed on writing and the writing process through reaction papers as well as analytic and creative compositions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, Permission of Department

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 024 — At the Far End of South America: Readings from Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.

Instructor(s): Raquel González (raquelng@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

If you enjoy reading literature, join us to discover its unique power to explore the culture of the these countries through the eyes of selected authors. Other written and visual texts will be incorporated. Readings, class discussions and group or individual written projects will give the opportunity for intensive use of the language to further develop your ability to perform at a higher level of proficiency in the different skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening).

Course structure: The course will be divided into two parts. During the first part, texts, articles from the WWW, short stories, legends and movies will be used. The second part will primarily consist of individualized study of a chosen topic and country by each student. Materials developed will be kept in a personal portfolio that will form the basis of final written report and oral presentation. The report may (with student approval) be published in a Web based newsletter.

Important note: Active participation in Spanish is expected from all students at all times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, Permission of Department

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 025, 026 — Contemporary Spain.

Instructor(s): Joaquin Florido-Berrocal (biligon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course will be to expand the cultural understanding of Spain by studying its history, politics, society, customs and language. At the same time you will further acquire the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Spanish culture and to express, in the past, present, and future, your own personal experiences, opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Throughout the course of the term we will be focusing on the following general themes:

  • Chapter 1 — introduction to the course, meeting each other, differences in educational systems and the art of Pablo Picasso
  • Chapter 2 — a comprehensive review of Spanish History
  • Chapter 3 — Civil War, dictatorship in Spain and the democratic process today
  • Chapter 4 — the traditions, customs and life style in Spain

The emphasis of the course is on the development of the four skills (listening, writing, reading, and speaking) and interpersonal communication. The practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary will be integrated into the content of the course. Most of these features will be review as you will have studied them previously; therefore, the goal will be to facilitate their acquisition and application in authentic and meaningful contexts. The course requires regular classroom participation and approximately two hours of outside preparation for every hour of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 027, 029 — Representing Lorca: Introduction to Spanish Culture and Performance of his Works.

Instructor(s): Jose-Luis Fernandez-Garcia (kronox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course is to motivate students to learn Spanish using plays, poems, and the Spanish culture as background to put materials into context.

Most of the course content studied will reflect the world of Federico García Lorca, a well known Spanish playwright and poet. The course will expand on the significance of feelings, the life and death of the poet, analysis of his works, and, ultimately, attempts to involve students in discussion and examination of the ideas presented.

Throughout the course one of his works, Blood wedding, will be acted out by the students. Therefore, willingness to participate in it is a must.

We will as well expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the aims of the course, that is:

  1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events;
  3. hypothesize about the future and present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 028, 030 — Las tres culturas en la España medieval.

Instructor(s): Juan Carlos de los Santos Plata (deloss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course will be to expand the cultural understanding of the coexistence of Christians, Jews and Moors in medieval Spain by studying their history, politics, society, customs and languages so that the students can become more conscious about the past, present and future situation of these three communities. At the same time the student will further acquire the Spanish language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, needed to discuss issues of relevance to the Spanish culture and to express, in the past, present, and future, his/her own personal experiences, opinions, reactions, conclusions and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Throughout the course of this academic term, we will be focusing on the following general themes:

Chapter 1, Introduction to the course, meeting each other. Political situation in 8th-century Spain after the Muslim conquest. First epic poem in Spanish language.

Chapter 2, The splendor of Al-Andalus under the Califato de Córdoba reign. First literary texts in Spanish.

Chapter 3, The Christian reconquest. 1492, Expulsion of Jews and Moors from Spain. "Escuela de Traductores de Toledo".(Translation School in Toledo)

Chapter 4, Who are the Sephardies' descendants? Current situation of the Sephardic community throughout the world. Analysis of the North African inmigration in Spain nowadays. Ladino, the language of the Sephardies.

The student will be expected to formally study and practice most of these structures individually through the course pack of the course, as well as to look for specific information in the Internet.

The course requires regular classroom attendance and participation, besides approximately two hours of outside preparation for every hour of class.

If you have any questions or doubts about any aspect of this course you can contact me through e-mail deloss@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 031, 032 — Introduction to the Hispanic World through Cinema and Popular Media.

Instructor(s): Andrew Noverr (anoverr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

Using the medium of cinema and vast array of popular media sources available on the World Wide Web, the goal of this course will be to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (Hispanic America and Spain) while they prepare issues of a course WebZine. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience of Hispanic history and society while contemplating how this experience is reflected in and influenced by popular media. At the same time, students will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency:

a. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
b. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events;
c. hypothesize about the future and present.

Some of the movies to be presented and discussed:

  • Todo sobre mi madre
  • La lengua de las mariposas
  • Men with Guns
  • Amores perros
  • Y tu mamá también

NOTE: Students will work individually and in groups to prepare materials for the course WebZine. NO knowledge of Web authoring software is necessary prior to the course. All students will participate in an introductory workshop that will familiarize them with the applications we will be using to publish the WebZine.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 033 — The Camino de Santiago: A Pilgrim's Journey.

Instructor(s): Andrea Hesp (ahesp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://personal.www.umich.edu/~ahesp

The 500-mile Camino de Santiago — St. James' way — is one of the three major Christian pilgrim routes in the world — Rome and Jerusalem being the other two. The Camino began gaining popularity during the 11th and 12th centuries when pilgrims started trekking across Northern Spain in order to reach Santiago de Compostela where they could touch the relics of St. James. Most pilgrims undertook this arduous journey in hopes of curing ailments and receiving pardon for past sins. In the last fifteen years, the Camino's popularity has been reemerging, although on a much more secular level (in 1996 over 100,000 people walked along the Camino). Although, the experience of the modern pilgrim is obviously quite different than the medieval one, both share one important aspect: the traveler, regardless if he or she is a believer of St. James' power, is guaranteed an adventure.

It is the journey of the pilgrim, both the medieval and contemporary one, that this course will try to reconstruct. As we study the Camino we will make several stops to take in some of the literature, culture, and architecture that the pilgrimage has to offer, just as the pilgrims have been doing for hundreds of years. Students will come out of the class with a better understanding the Camino de Santiago, and have the tools to begin the pilgrimage on their own along the Camino, if they wish.

The course will emphasize speaking and reading, in addition to a solid review of grammar. The practice and application of grammatical functions and vocabulary will be integrated in the content of the course. Materials will be provided in a comprehensive course pack that includes the reading and grammar in a logical order that will take into account the lineal path of the Camino, as well as the students' ability. Requirements will include active class participation, quizzes, homework, compositions, a final project, and a final exam, both oral and written.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, Permission of Department

SPANISH 250. First-Year Humanities Seminar in Hispanic Studies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 — Innocence and Experience.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colás (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will use Phillip Pullman's trilogy, His Dark Materials, along with selected films and other short readings, to explore ideas about innocence and experience as they relate to our lives. Related topics likely to arise for discussion will be knowledge, ignorance, death, sexuality, language, silence, intuition, reason, responsibility, freedom, fate, free will, karma, suffering, joy, and peace.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 275 or 276. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/275/001.nsf

SPANISH 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/276/001.nsf

SPANISH 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Text: Course pack. Part 1 at Excel (1117 South University); Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 290 / AMCULT 224. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses the particular linguistic needs and interests of students of Hispanic descent and heritage born and/or educated in the United States interested in acquiring a formal and structural knowledge of Spanish, in further expanding vocabulary at the abstract and professional levels, and in developing their skills in formal and professional writing. Sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States — code-switching, linguistic attitudes, bilingualism — also will be explored in relation to the politics of cultural identity. Short weekly assignments and exercises emphasizing the differences between oral and written modes of communication and between formal and informal Spanish will be required, along with a midterm and final exam. Readings will include cultural essays, literatures, and scholarly articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 003 — Spanish for the Medical Professions.

Instructor(s): Ann M Hilberry (hilberry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course's objective is to prepare students who will be working in medical fields to interact with the Spanish-speaking population. Students will build up their Spanish vocabulary and will hone their linguistic skills to prepare them to communicate effectively in Spanish in situations relating to the medical professions. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will require active daily participation on the part of the students as great emphasis will be placed on pair work and small group work. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a written midterm exam, and an oral final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 308(401/306). Workshop in Academic Writing.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275, 276. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students who are currently registered in at least one other upper-level Spanish course, and who wish to refine their writing skills. Students will use class time to review points of grammar, principles of composition, and techniques of literary analysis, using writing assignments for their other Spanish courses as the material. Students will bring essays to class for peer-editing and assistance from the instructor. The emphasis will be on improving grammar and vocabulary for written expression.

The class will meet once a week, and students are required to meet with the instructor for peer-editing and consultation at least one additional hour per week.

Students who are not concurrently enrolled in other upper-level Spanish courses are not eligible for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Descripción y objetivos

Este curso aporta una visión panorámica de la literatura en lengua española desde la perspectiva de tres de sus áreas principales: colonial, latinoamericana y peninsular. El material de trabajo para esta clase se compone de una selección de obras literarias de narrativa, poesía, teatro y ensayo en los que se tratan algunas de las nociones más representativas de dichas áreas: otredad, construcción de la identidad individual, nacional y cultural, la literatura como compromiso, relación entre ficción y realidad. Complementadas con diversos textos audiovisuales (mapas, murales, grabados, pinturas, fotografías y películas), estas obras permiten una aproximación inicial a la literatura en lengua española por medio de los temas más recurrentes que se evocan en dichas lecturas: soledad, amor, opresión política, tensión racial, muerte, locura, y religión.

A través del estudio de este grupo de textos, el alumno entrará en contacto con géneros, tendencias, terminología y temáticas más relevantes dentro de la literatura de diversos países hispanohablantes. Adicionalmente, el alumno se familiarizará con las convenciones académicas en el campo de la literatura con miras a la especialización en literaturas hispánicas.

Método de trabajo

La lectura de los textos debe ser atenta y detallada, acompañada siempre de una reflexión final que sirva como base para la discusión en clase. Dicha reflexión debe permitir al alumno hacer una exposición clara del argumento, elaborar las implicaciones de los temas que se desarrollan en la lectura asignada, y profundizar con un espíritu crítico en la problemática que plantean. Del mismo modo, se anima al alumno a realizar una lectura comparada de estos textos con el fin de establecer conexiones entre ellos y con otras formas de expresión artística (cine, pintura, fotografía etc.) para adquirir, de esta manera, una perspectiva más rica de cada campo literario.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

El curso presta atención a los autores y corrientes literarias más relevantes del cuento hispanoamericano siguiendo un desarrollo cronológico del mismo de acuerdo a las lecturas en detalle propuestas en el programa. Dichas lecturas se completan con textos secundarios que aportan un diálogo crítico con respecto a las clasificaciones tradicionales del cuento como "género" relevante y destacado dentro la narrativa de América Latina. Asimismo, se propone tanto una revisión terminológica de las llamadas narrativas breves (cuento, relato, novella, etc.) como histórica (romanticismo, realismo, modernismo, criollismo, "boom", etc.) de la cuentística hispanoamericana.

Lecturas:

  • Borges, Jorge Luis. Ficciones
  • Cortázar, Julio. Relatos.
  • Darío, Rubén. Azul
  • García Márquez, Gabriel. Eréndira
  • Menton, Seymour. El cuento hispanoamericano: antología crítico-histórica.
  • Quiroga, Horacio. Cuentos de amor, de locura y de muerte

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 335. Contemporary Spanish and Spanish-American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Narrativa mexicana del siglo XX.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

El propósito de este curso es familiarizar a los estudiantes con la obra narrativa de algunos de los autores mexicanos más destacados de los últimos cuarenta años. Leeremos una pequeña muestra de la obra de algunos de estos autores cada día, ya sea un cuento famoso o selecciones de una de sus novelas más conocidas. Dedicaremos la mayor parte de la clase a comentar el contenido y el estilo de los textos, tanto colectivamente como en grupos pequeños. Por lo general, al principio de la clase el profesor hablará brevemente sobre algún momento o aspecto clave del contexto histórico, social, cultural y/o político en que se desarrollan y/o fueron escritas estas obras. Posteriormente, les hará preguntas sobre los textos a los estudiantes, ya sea de manera individual o a su grupo de discusión en general. El libro de texto que utilizaremos es la Antología de la narrativa mexicana del siglo XX volúmen 2 de Christopher Domínguez-Michael (1996)

Los aspectos que se enfatizarán más en este curso serán el conocimiento y la comprensión de los textos leídos y la partipación en clase. La nota final estará basada en tres exámenes (25 % cada uno) y en la participación en y la asistencia puntual a clase (25%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 340. Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The history of Spain and its people while following the general development of other Western countries, offers some peculiarities that are due to the presence of a highly advanced culture that has left important physical and cultural traces. Its varied history that goes from the Roman times to Arabic domination to its development as the superpower of the Renaissance world has created a complex society that is still seeking to find coherence and unity. This course seeks to give an overview of Spanish history and society by focusing on some of the major points of its history. The course will have unit readings on a variety of topics that go from the Moorish conquest, to the role of the Inquisition, the Conquest of America as well as the more problematic modern period that includes the Civil War, the dictatorship, and the return to democracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 350. Independent Studies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the concentration advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 372. Survey of Spanish Literature, II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Luis Martin-Cabrera (loumarti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introductory survey of Spanish literature from the 18th century to the present. Lectures, readings, and reports. The course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basic traits of Latin American literature since the XIXth century. The course will relate literature and culture with the social and political changes that have marked the process of Latin American societies since 1830, the period corresponding to the beginning of the formation of the national states. Classes will evolve from Romanticism, Naturalism, and Modernism, the three main XIXth century styles, to the development of a popular literary consciousness ("Criollismo", "Costumbrismo," "Indigenismo") during the first half of the XXth century, as well as the more modern styles developed by the writers of the "avant-garde" ("Vanguardismo"), the "Literatura del Boom," and the more recent examples of "Testimonio," linked to present-day discussions on gender and other contemporary aspects of Latin American everyday life. Texts: Garganigo/de Costa/Heller/Luiselli/ Sabat de Rivers/Sklodowska/ Huellas de las literaturas hispanoamericanas (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Independent Study. Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

SPANISH 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Detailed analysis of specific syntactic problems such as theory of the tenses of the verb, the subjunctive mood, structure of simple and compound sentences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 413 / ROMLING 413 / EDCURINS 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 414 / ROMLING 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard, and an overview of the linguistic situation in modern Spain. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 428. Internship in Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and two 300-level SPANISH courses. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows up to 3 credits for internships that involve the extensive use of Spanish, either abroad or within the US. Some of the internships may be offered in established study-abroad programs, others will be offered by companies or non-profit organizations.

Our department offers a community service course (SPANISH 448), but we do not have the means to organize individual internships. Therefore, students will have to take the initiative to locate, arrange, and propose the internships. We highly recommend the non-profit organization, Amigos de las Americas (http://www.amigoslink.org), a well-established volunteer program that places students in public-health projects throughout Latin America.

Before the internship, you must arrange the following:

  1. Find a sponsoring faculty member who will advise you, suggest readings, and evaluate the written work that you will submit during and/or after you complete the internship.

  2. Submit a letter from the director or supervisor of the internship program. This letter must:

    • describe the service work you will perform

    • confirm that you will primarily use Spanish in that service work

    • specify how many working hours are involved (a minimum of 100 contact hours is required for a three-credit course, or 33 hours per credit if enrolled for less than 3 credits)

  3. Submit a proposal that includes a reading list and written assignments. The proposal should include:

    • An introductory paragraph that describes the work site and the services you will perform. Also, you should indicate how the work relates to your academic interests and specialization (concentrations/minor) and to your future career plans.

    • A brief list of readings related to your service work (for example, 2-3 books, or 5-10 articles, or an appropriate mix of books and articles). You may choose readings yourself or ask your faculty sponsor for suggestions. We recognize that in an internship, most of your time is taken up by service work; the required minimum amount of related readings will help you to reflect critically and thoughtfully on your experiences.

    • A description of your writing assignments, which may consist either of several short papers or a final project, but must total 10 ­ 20 pages. You may write, for example, a narrative summary of your experiences, including critical reflections that also draw from the readings. Or you may write a research paper based on your experiences and the readings.

After completing the internship, you will submit to your faculty sponsor the remaining written assignments along with a second letter from your supervisor in the internship program. This letter should describe the work you performed and reconfirm that it met the requirements of 100 contact hours of primary Spanish usage (or 33 hours per credit).

Enrollment: You may enroll in this course, SPANISH 428, either during the term in which you are working as an intern (in which case you would submit the written work at the end of that term) or in the term after you return from the internship and submit your work then. In either case, you must make arrangements in our department before you begin the internship by finding a faculty sponsor and submitting a proposal for his/her approval. If you are already abroad when you find an opportunity for an internship, you may through e-mail seek a faculty sponsor and send a proposal to him/her before you begin work. In such a case, you should first contact professors with whom you have had class. If none is available to serve as a sponsor, review the complete list of faculty at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/FacultySpan.html. When you are ready to enroll for the credits, your faculty sponsor will notify our Student Services Representative, who will enter an electronic permission to allow you to enroll in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Queer Culture of the Hispanic Caribbean and its Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Lawrence LaFountain-Stokes

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/430/001.nsf

This course is an exploration of select cultural texts (film, literature, essay, performance, cartoons) from the insular Hispanic Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico) and its U.S. Diaspora that present issues of lesbianism, homosexuality, bisexuality, transvestism, and transgender identities and practices. The course will seek to use social science research (especially on sexuality and migration) to understand varied cultural productions. Some of the main issues explored will be:

  • How do Hispanic Caribbean paradigms of sexuality differ from those dominant in the U.S.?
  • What is the role and effect of migration on sexual expression?
  • How does homophobia manifest itself in Hispanic Caribbean communities?
  • What has been the impact of the Cuban Revolution on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community?
  • How do gender, class, and race affect this framework?
  • How has activism affected this situation?
  • How are these issues explored in cultural productions?
  • What aesthetic strategies do artists employ in their representations of this issue?

Readings (and films) will include works by Reinaldo Arenas, Rane Arroyo, Junot Díaz, Magali García Ramis, Erika. Lopez, Ian Lumsden, Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Achy Obejas, Juanita Ramos, Manuel Ramos Otero, Sonia Rivera-Valdés, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Mayra Santos-Febres, Carmelita Tropicana, Luz Maria Umpierre, and Judd Winick. This course will have a required weekly film screening in addition to regular class meetings. Course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

SPANISH 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Spain from the Margins.

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor (moreiras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the regional literatures of Spain in order to analyze the tensions underlying the construction of a National literary canon. We will focus on the production of Catalan, Basque, Galician and other peripheral traditions to reflect upon topics such as nationalism, Spanishness, cultural identities, language and nation, the migrant subject, transculturation, hybridity, among others. Based on historical and cultural readings we will trace a cultural history of each Region. Readings will include Rosalía de Castro, Ramón del Valle-Inclán, Mercé Rododera, Manuel Rivas, Suso de Toro, Juan Marsé, Bernardo Atxaga, Xosé Luis Méndez Ferrín, among others. The class will include Spanish films dealing with this topics. Readings in Spanish translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students interested in using the Spanish language within a social context and through interactions with local Latino/a communities. It integrates service work within that community with academic readings and discussions about U.S. Latino or Hispanic culture.

Service work: Students will work as tutors with Latino children in a program operated by ALAS (Asociación de Latinos Alcanzando Sueños). On Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:30, they will meet with the children and during the first hour, involve the children in learning activities in Spanish. Then during the second hour, the tutors will help them with their school work in English. The final half-hour, from 8:00 to 8:30, is designated for conferences with the parents and with the Director of ALAS. For the hour allotted to learning activities in Spanish, the tutors must prepare a syllabus of activities as well as learning activities and materials. They will also work in consultation with parents and teachers to set goals for each child during the term. In addition, tutors will keep a journal describing their work with the children and tracing their progress. At the end of the term, tutors will prepare a list of suggestions for the replacement tutor.

Weekly seminar and class-work: Students will meet once a week, Tuesdays, 2:30-4:00, to discuss the community service work and to exchange ideas and learning materials. In addition, each week we will discuss a short reading relevant to Hispanic culture and to the service work. The written assignments for the course are the same as those required by ALAS — a list of goals, syllabus, and journal — which students will submit to both the Director of ALAS and the professor. In addition, brief quizzes will be given on the readings to encourage reflection on the cultural issues faced in the service work.

Time commitment: Based on U-M guidelines, one credit is equivalent to one hour of class-time and two hours of work on average outside of class (LSA Bulletin, p. 28); hence, a 3-credit course assumes a total time commitment of 9 hours a week. The hours of work required for this course have been calculated accordingly: 1 1/2 hour of class, 5 hours of service work, 2 1/2 hours of work in reading, writing, and preparation outside of class. It is of the utmost importance that students make a commitment to the children we serve, which means that they must attend the tutoring sessions regularly and arrive on time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 459. Don Quijote.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Don Quijote y la formación de la novela moderna

I. Objetivos del curso

El presente seminario estudiará este texto canónico desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando en su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adaptan a la sensibilidad moderna. Se prestará atención a aspectos tales como la naturaleza del texto, su consideración narratológica como lectura frente al género popular y auditivo del teatro, y su lugar dentro de la escena cultural de su momento. Simultáneamente, se analizarán aspectos estrictamente literarios como la coherencia textual, personajes y marginalidad, espacios urbanos y rurales, sexualidad latente o abierta, violencia y cuerpo, paradigmas de subversión ideológica, subtradiciones literarias en juego o espacios míticos y simbólicos. La clase y lecturas asignadas serán en español.

II. Requisitos

Los textos asignados en clase deberán ser leídos en su totalidad. La base pedagógica del curso se estructura a partir de un "close reading" de la obra. Como complemento, se leerán las correspondientes lecturas críticas así como la bibliografía adicional recomendada por el profesor, ya sean pertenecientes a los textos o al contexto en que se generaron. El estudiante deberá realizar una presentación oral en clase sobre el fragmento del texto que más le interese. Un examen parcial y un examen final (para la segunda mitad del curso solamente) completarán la nota global.

III. Criterios de evaluación

La evaluación final estará basada en la nota la presentación (15%), los dos exámenes (25% cada uno) y la preparación y participación en clase (35%). Sólo se admiten ausencias por enfermedad (con nota médica) o festividad religiosa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 460. The Spanish Comedia.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the national drama of Spain in the 17th century. Its plays vary from historical narratives to social comedies. As Spain moved into the early modern period, its dramatists sought to depict their society and found it wavering between old ideals, strict social and moral codes and a desire to break away from these restrictions. The course will highlight these contradictions and will attempt to reveal the social, economic and political fault lines that were soon to bring down the Spanish Empire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 472. Pre-Columbian Societies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Indigenous Peoples of the Americas: What we know about them and how we represent them.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/472/001.nsf

This course will focus on Ancient civilizations in the Americas and how we perceive them today. One of its purposes is to give students an idea of the vast variety of indigenous cultures in pre-Columbian times, how much we know about some of them but, most of all, how much we ignore. Special attention will be paid to their subsistence patterns and social organizational principles. Another goal of this course is to analyze the ways in which we, from a Western vantage point, portray indigenous cultures. Michael D. Coe gives us the chance to focus on a study of Maya culture before the arrival of the Spaniards. It provides us, too, with a challenging example of the pros and cons of ethnohistorical and archaeological reconstruction. We will read Steve Stern's book on a region of the former Inca Empire, Huamanga, in order to learn about the relationship between the Inca rulers and their subjects. The book also deals with the different ways in which indigenous peoples from the Andes adapted to the changes provoked by European colonization. A book compiled by Pauketat and Emerson will contain information about the cultures that populated the Valleys of the Rivers Ohio and Mississippi in prehistoric times. In order to see how nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers view indigenous cultures, we will read a couple of novels: The Last of the Mohicans, by J. Fenimore Cooper, and People of the River, by W. M. Gear and K. OUNeal. We are also going to watch a few movies that represent indigenous subjects and cultures, such as Hollywood Westerns and a couple of ethnographic films, as well as fragments from Pocahontas, 1492, and others. At the end of the course we will pass the mike to the indigenous subjects themselves and will try to listen to what they have to say. The two books that will close the course are Shadows of Tender Fury, by Subcomandante Marcos (about the Chiapas, Mexico, insurgent indigenous movement) and Peace, Power and Righteousness. An Indigenous Manifesto, by Taiaiake Alfred.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 473. Colonial/Postcolonial Studies in Latin-American Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/473/001.nsf

One of the goals of this course is to explore the limitations of Postcolonial theory as a tool to understand or make sense of Latin American culture and society. We will read authors like Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Ngugi Wa Thiongo, Aimé Césaire and many other Postcolonial critics. Most of these authors elaborated their theoretical apparatuses from the perspective of subjects who had broken the colonial ties to empires such as the British and French ones. At the same time, we will read some canonical Latin American literary works and will watch some Latin American films in order to test the explanatory power of the aforementioned Postcolonial critics. Parallel to these readings we will study some Latin American critics such as Hugo Achugar, Angel Rama and Néstor García Canclini, whose theoretical frameworks are originated in the framework of decolonization that Latin American independent republics have been developing for the last 175 years, in order to see how their approaches differ from the ones practiced by Postcolonial authors. Through the comparison of these different types of texts we will be able to assess the explanatory power of Postcolonial theory as well as its limitations for the study of Latin America. We will also be able to evaluate the methods and theories generated by Latin Americanists, not only from Latin America, but also from the U.S. academic world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Slavery, Freedom and "Mulataje": Representations of the African Diaspora in XIX Latin America.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did slavery as an institution became a subject of representation? How did slaves and its descendants negotiate their access to literature, art and culture in slave societies? This course is a survey of the representations of Africans, and African descendants in nineteenth-century Latin America. From a first view of the Haitian Revolution and the ways the dialectics of master and slave were built in the turn of the century, we will analyze the struggles to construct an ethic of freedom for blacks and mulattoes in Latin America. From this point of view we will focus on slave narratives' such as Cuban Juan Francisco Manzano's Autobiografía de un esclavo (1841) and novels about mulato (a) characters, such as Cirilo Villaverde's Cecilia Valdés, Aluízio de Azevedo's O Mulato (El mulato) and Bernardo de Guimarães A Escrava Isaura (La esclava Isaura). We will locate many of these novels in the race, class and social clashes between blacks, mulattoes and whites in these societies. From here we will define the complexity of notions such as: mestizaje, colonization, freedom, and culture, and its many crosses with representations of race, gender and sexuality. Along with literary texts and documentaries, we will discuss historical, sociological views of the XIX century written by contemporary sociologists and historians. Two papers 5-6 pages, final paper (10 pages), Seminar will be conducted in Spanish, Brazilian texts will be given in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Poesía mexicana del siglo XX.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Los tres objetivos principales de este curso son 1) presentar a los estudiantes un panorama general de la poesía mexicana del siglo veinte, 2) enseñarles algunas nociones básicas de retórica, poética y métrica, así como de la literatura, la cultura y la historia en general que les serán útiles para mejor comprender y apreciar esta poesía y 3) estudiar detalladamente cómo y bajo qué circunstancias escribieron su poema favorito algunos de los poetas mexicanos contemporáneos más conocidos. Dedicaremos las primeras semanas al estudio de cómo y porqué se escribieron algunos de los poemas más famosos de los últimos cuarenta años y posteriormente leeremos detenidamente algunos de los mejores poemas mexicanos escritos entre 1916 y 1966. Los libros requeridos para el curso son _Poesía en movimiento: México, 1915-1966_ (Octavio Paz, et a) y _El poeta en un poema_ (Marco Antonio Campos). Estos libros estarán a la venta en Schoenhof's Foreign Books probablemente dos o tres semanas antes del inicio de las clases. La página web de esta librería es "http://www.schoenhofs.com."

Los aspectos que se enfatizarán más en este curso serán el conocimiento y la comprensión de los textos leídos y la partipación en clase. La nota final estará basada en tres exámenes (25 % cada uno) y en la participación en y la asistencia puntual a clase (25%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — The Novel of the Mexican Revolution.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Mexican Revolution was the defining event in modern Mexican history. It also shaped the course of Mexican literature throughout the twentieth century. In this course, we will read some of the most important and influential novels dealing with the revolution and its place in modern Mexican cultural history.

Readings:

Mariano Azuela. Los de abajo.
Nellie Campobello. Cartucho.
Juan Rulfo. Pedro Páramo.
Carlos Fuentes. La muerte de Artemio Cruz.
Elena Garro. Recuerdos del porvenir.
Jorge Ibargüengoitia. Los relámpagos de agosto.
Gilbert M. Joseph & Timothy J. Henderson, Eds. The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Manuel Puig's Movie House.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why is Manuel Puig so fascinated by films such as "Blood and Sand" or "The Great Waltz"? Why do Puig's writings use the iconography of Hollywood to represent Latin American societies? Is Puig really a novelist or a movie script writer? To answer these questions, this course examines Puig's "movie house" as the point of departure for his fictions and as the place for his literary and cinematic inventions.

Selected Readings

  • Manuel Puig. La traición de Rita Hayworth
  • ---. Materiales iniciales (compiled by Amícola)
  • ---. El beso de la mujer araña
  • ---. Pubis angelical
  • ---. Cae la noche tropical
  • ---. The Buenos Aires Affair
  • Levine, Suzanne J. Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman.
  • Campos, René. La textura cinemática de Manuel Puig.
  • Kerr, Lucille. Suspended Fictions.

Selected Films:

  • "Blood and Sand"
  • "The Great Waltz"
  • "Cat People"
  • "In Old Chicago"
  • "Weekend in Havana"

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level SPANISH literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (SPANISH 491), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/spanishhonors.pdf

Independent Study. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of literary studies as a discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/spanishhonors.pdf

Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Graduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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