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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in University Courses


This page was created at 6:50 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



UC 102. The Student in the University.

Section 001 — CLASS MEETS Every week SEPT 2- OCT 14 and less frequently through NOV 11. (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review their role in the university and as a Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. It will allow students to consider the expectations of their university experience within a framework of theoretical perspectives. It is hoped that students will develop a broad understanding of what their university experience can include and how they can shape it to realize their academic potential and intellectual development. The course will focus on the transition from high school to college, access to faculty, identity issues, critical thinking, social justice, and community service learning. The issues and challenges of living and working in a multicultural society will be examined. The large group discussions will focus on student perceptions, relevant research, and university resources. The small group discussions will focus on the readings and areas of practical concern. This course is open only to students in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 104. Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participant in UROP-in-Residence Program. (1). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/uc/104/001.nsf

Research is the search for new knowledge and there are numerous methods researchers use to seek new knowledge and or find solutions to pressing societal, medical, or other problems. Research methods can range from direct observations to intricate laboratory experiments manipulating a set of variables. This course will provide you with an introduction to the primary research methods used in different fields. The major methods we will cover are: (1)field or observational research; (2)survey research; (3)experimental design; (4) clinical research;(5) participatory action research; and (6)archival research. Throughout the academic term we will bring in faculty researchers who employ different types of research methods and engage you in activities to learn about these various research methods. In addition, we will visit research sites on and off-campus. By the end of the term you should have a good understanding of a wide array of research methods and the strengths and weaknesses of these methods.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 105. Perspectives on Health and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle H O'Grady (mmidwif@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program. (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/uc/105/001.nsf

Perspectives on Health and Health-Care is the required core course for members of the Health Sciences Scholars Program. UC105 and 106 together provide a contextual examination of professional roles and disciplines within health science and care, the science informing those roles, and the issues challenging professionals. These issues include the balance of "nature and nurture," health and the environment, technology and ethics, the allocation of resources, the relationship between personal autonomy and health, and the nature of human relationships within the system of health care. Practitioners from many disciplines within the health sciences will present case studies illustrating these themes. This content provides a foundation for professional involvement in health care and science by encouraging an informed consideration of the complexity of health, developing challenges, and the spectrum of health professions.

Students will examine the major themes of the course by exploring the following questions: What are the relative contributions to human health and illness from genetics, behavior, and the environment? Should scientists develop, and practitioners utilize, technologic innovations knowing that this research and the use of the technologies will engender ethical dilemmas? At what point does our desire to provide the best possible health care to all persons conflict with the limits of our resources and other needs of society? What are the rights and responsibilities of individuals with regard to maintaining their own health, and how might these clash with the corresponding rights and responsibilities of health care providers and society? How do the norms and values of different health disciplines relate to the need to provide coordinated, collegial, evidence-based health care? How do these issues play out in students' consideration of their future professional lives?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 — Music in Our Lives.

Instructor(s): Louis B Nagel (julou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course, students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, harmony, etc. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class. [Majority of spaces reserved for participants in Michigan Community Scholars Program]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 — Origins of Creativity.

Instructor(s): Kenneth J Pienta (kpienta@umich.edu), Karin Olsen (kbolsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The DNA of a chimpanzee and of a human are 99% similar, and yet one species can design a spaceship while the other can use a simple stick to find ants. Why? What are the origins of human creativity? Can we teach ourselves to be more creative? This seminar will introduce students to the process of creative thought through examination of major discoveries in the history of the physical and biological sciences. We will examine the traits of creative individuals and how the environment and culture of their time influenced them. Specific individuals to be examined include Copernicus, Da Vinci, Einstein, Watson and Crick, and Edison.

Each student will present a major scientific discovery of their choosing, evaluating the thought processes leading to the discovery and discussing why it was creative and how it built on and differed from pre-existing paradigms. Students will be required to submit a paper as well as do an oral presentation to the seminar group. They also will be required to submit brief written responses to the week's reading assignment prior to class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 004 — Reading in Real Time.

Instructor(s): William Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What can we learn from the contemporary novel? In this seminar, we will try to forget any sense of timeless classics that we may have picked up in literature classes, and explore together what fiction at the turn of the new century is telling us about where we are going and how. We will look at how and why (and even whether) we should engage in reading as part of the exhilarating and disturbing life that keeps tumbling forward in us and around us. Can we find writing that quickens the pulse, that shows us things we hadn't seen before, maybe shows us new problems and ideas just starting to become noticeable? Perhaps novelists and poets are like a huge network of antennae, catching a few signals within all the noise the world is making. How can we go about finding those things and learning them on the fly, without turning into antisocial fiction-reading scholarly recluses? And how do we go about using what we've learned? What do we gain for life from reading?

These are the questions; the methods will include reading (of course), short and sometimes experimental writing assignments, very brief class presentations, and lots of discussion. The texts will include fiction by such writers as Nicholson Baker, William Gibson, Clarice Lispector, Octavia Butler, and Alex Shakar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 005 — From One Community to Another: Our Journeys.

Instructor(s): Maria Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have the borders moved? How do journeys crossing borders create communities? This seminar will look at your experiences, individual experiences, and community experiences to encourage the discussion and reflection of our own 'communities'. Students in this seminar will be actively participating, reading, and writing about different communities and journeys. You will also get a chance to do your own journey for this seminar.

This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (first-year interest groups). Students in all of the FIGS seminars will participate in a day-long retreat on Sunday, September 7th from 8:30 to 5:00. Students enrolled in this seminar are required to attend the retreat.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 — Community in the 21st Century: Exploring Home, Identity, & Place in Virtual Context.

Instructor(s): Maurita Holland (mholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the possibilities for using the World Wide Web for documenting, celebrating, and sharing a sense of place. We will begin with an examination of physical place as ecology, as a community of shared values or perspective, and as a culture.

  • Is there a global community in natural systems that transcend human communities?
  • In a world where people move frequently and freely, how is community created?
  • Can human cultures be maintained as national boundaries blur?

The course will proceed to a consideration of Web-based community.

  • Can "place" be virtual space?
  • Is a community bounded by physical geography?
  • Can individuals live in multiple communities?

Through reading, discussion, and written assignments, students will develop their own sense of place. The course will culminate in individual, place-based projects. Students will use information technology, including digital cameras, Web authoring tools, and display technology to write, photograph, publish, and report orally their individual work. [Majority of spaces reserved for participants in Michigan Community Scholars Program.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 — Lives of Urban Children & Youth: Schools, Community, Power.

Instructor(s): Stella L Raudenbush (stellarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

UC 151 is a service-learning course that integrates traditional coursework with personal reflection and community involvement. The goal of the course is to explore the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings. This course will help university students understand the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of young children and how community members, especially elders, help to create and support positive roles for young children within this community. Students will work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that help to shape social identity and social expectations within the community.

As a requirement for the course, students will complete five hours of service each week in the Detroit public school system to develop practical service-learning models. Assisting educators in implementing these developed programs will give students the opportunity to put into practice the theory of service-learning. [Majority of spaces reserved for participants in Michigan Community Scholars Program.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 — Medicine & the Media from Hippocrates through "ER".

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern, and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., St. Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of students' own beliefs about medicine in the 21st century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 004 — Human Sexuality & Gender Issues.

Instructor(s): Frances L Mayes (frnmayes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/uc/151/004.nsf

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectives, including historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual throughout their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior, and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality, etc.

Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including choice of sexual partners and behaviors, the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making, sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias. The course requires access to the Internet, and uses a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a term project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 — Science and Practice of Dentistry.

Instructor(s): Russell S Taichman (rtaich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/uc/151/005.nsf

Students will examine the development of dentistry from its origins to its present status as a scientifically-driven health care discipline. Students will critically evaluate how science has influenced the development of dentistry as a discipline for the past century and explore how emerging scientific disciplines are likely to change the practice of dentistry in the next millennium.

Please attend every session if possible. If you are unable to attend a class, please email me before hand. This is not a lecture course with a final written exam. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, ask questions, and offer opinions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 — Health Care, Privilege, Community.

Instructor(s): Terence Joiner (tjoiner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Health Care, Privilege, and Community" will consist of four sections. The first will provide an overview of medical and health care concepts and terms as they relate to multiculturalism. The understanding of these concepts will be critical for students, as they lay the groundwork for the remainder of the course. The class will examine issues relating to consumers of health care, which will include discussions of the major ethnic and racial groups in the United States. Many of the class discussions will focus on these new consumers, e.g., various ethnic communities, elders, and other interest groups that have been "left behind" as major players in healthcare. In addition, the class will take a look at physicians and other types of health care providers with special attention to the providers from the major demographic groups.

Thirdly, we will examine the dilemmas within our health care system. Class discussions will focus on health disparities, ethical issues related to research in different ethnic groups, and discrimination in health care. Finally, solutions to the present health care dilemmas will be discussed. We will investigate the future challenges for equitable health care based on the demographic changes that have occurred in the United States over the last two decades. It will be important for students to gain an understanding of how these changes have resulted in new important consumers and providers of health care services. Subsequently, a discussion of current health disparities today will be an integral part of understanding whether they will persist in the future. [Majority of spaces reserved for participants in Michigan Community Scholars Program]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 007 — Identity, Alienation, Freedom.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/uc/151/007.nsf

The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the concepts of identity, alienation, and freedom as psychological and philosophical concepts. However, the orientation will be specific and applied to the normal situations and predicaments that college students experience. Questions to be considered: surviving as an individual in a large and often impersonal university; living up to and/or dealing with the expectations of parents and teachers; questioning authority in the context of the classroom; trading-off career pressures and personal goals in setting educational priorities.

Of special importance will be the examination of the sometimes frightening loss of a sense of identity that often accompanies significant alterations in lifestyle, such as that experienced by students in the transition from high school to college, or later, in the transition from college to the "real world." In addition to regular class meetings, each student will meet individually with the instructor every third week to develop and discuss individual reading and writing assignments. Grades will be determined by the quantity and quality of this reading and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 008 — People, Politics, & Intergroup Relations in Global Perspective.

Instructor(s): Javed Nazir (jnazir@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the current contradictions between the West and the Middle Eastern and Muslim countries by studying stereotypes on both sides and how media and others exploit politically popular themes. We will consider various means of enhancing collaboration and breaking down the walls of mistrust and bias. We also will probe questions such as why intellectual dialogue has more or less broken down, and why thinking people are unable to connect with their counterparts across the religious and cultural divide.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 154. First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar.

Section 001 — Environment, Sustainability & Social Change. Meets with Environ 139.019.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Environment 139.019.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 154. First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar.

Section 002 — Medicine, Culture, and Creativity.

Instructor(s): Lucila Nerenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

  • Is the current health care system culturally competent?
  • How do the different health care professions provide the best care for their patients, when they belong to a different culture than one's own?
  • Can literature, music and visual arts help broaden our understanding across differences?

Students are invited to actively use their own legacies to address these questions. We will focus on health issues in the following populations: African American, Asian American, Native American and Latino/a, among others. Exposure to the arts within each group will improve our recognition of each individual's unique experience as a member of any ethnicity.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Become familiar with health problems, cultural strengths and clinical approaches to major ethnic subgroups in the U.S.
  2. Develop awareness of your own identity.
  3. Adquire experience in using the arts to deepen understanding across cultures.

WHAT TO EXPECT:

  1. Active participation in class discussions.
  2. Reading assignments of both scientific journals and selected literature from each culture. Due first class weekly, unless specified otherwise.
  3. Invited speakers, film footage and in-class music samples.
  4. Weekly assignments: 3 typewritten questions generated by required readings, due first class weekly, unless specified otherwise.
  5. Final paper: The topic is an autobiographical paper examining one's own identities and health experiences (for yourself and/or extended family) focusing on health challenges/ strengths identified in the course readings and discussion. Interviews of family members are optional. Additional readings are available for groups not included in the syllabus. It should be typed, double spaced and 5-7 pages long.
  6. Grading :

    • class participation, including class attendance (40%).
    • weekly papers (30%).
    • final project (30%).
  7. Regular attendance is required to ensure a passing grade.

Required readings in a Course pack available at AccuCopy on 518 E. William.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 163. Biotechnology and Human Values.

Section 001 — Meets with Engineering 100.500.

Instructor(s): Matthew O'Donnell (odonnel@umich.edu), Miriam E Adam (mimiadam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students only. (4). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/engr/100/500.nsf

Biotechnology combines the engineering principles of analysis, design, and optimization with the tools of cellular and molecular biology. It impacts nearly every aspect of our daily lives, from the food we eat to the medicine we take. The primary purpose of this course is to teach a basic vocabulary in biotechnology and expose students to the breadth of biotechnology and its impact on our daily lives. Topics will cover a broad range of applications in genetics, molecular diagnostics, molecular imaging, and clinical devices. A key additional component will be to investigate human values issues, such as ethical questions and cost effectiveness, arising from these technologies. Teamwork in the lab and through an independent project is emphasized. Report writing and presentations are required throughout the term, culminating with a final report and public presentation.

Welcome! This course brings together students in the life sciences and engineering to explore basic issues facing biotechnologists. In addition to introducing basic sciences, this course will explore some of the dominant trends in biotechnology, not only in terms of their scientific and technological impact, but also in terms of their implications for human values. Our objective is to provide you with the real life challenge of designing a solution for a client and allow you to experience the complex dynamics that govern the design process in the interdisciplinary field of Biotechnology.

The Lab
Unique to this course are two hands-on labs: DNA analysis and molecular imaging. These labs will allow you to assess the efficacy and feasibility of existing technologies, as well as explore their suitability for a spectrum of social, political, and economic realities.

The Project
As another unique opportunity of this course, you will conduct an investigative study for a real client, the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Your project will consist of designing a test capable of detecting hereditary disease before the onset of symptoms. You will be assigned to a project team, which, in turn, will be assigned to a client physician. Your team will collaborate with the physician to determine how the prognosis of a target disease could benefit from genetic testing. This will require research into the genetics of the target disease, the disease process, treatments, and evaluation of the potential impact of early detection for the individual patient, health care management and society at large. Given the needs of the patient and physicians, you will draw on your research and lab experiences to determine the most useful and appropriate methods for pre-symptom testing. This will require a quantitative, as well as qualitative, evaluation of your proposed technology and its effect on disease outcome, health care delivery, and patient quality of life.

Course Organization and Resources
This course is conducted by a multi-disciplinary team of instructors led by Professor Matthew O'Donnell. Your time in the classroom will be divided into biweekly lectures, a weekly lab and a weekly discussion section. In addition, each team will meet periodically with instructors in scheduled workshops held during evening hours. Deliverables will consist of technical assignments, lab reports, oral presentations, and a final formal oral presentation and report for our clients and other interested parties.

In this course, we rely heavily on independent study, instructor student interaction and on-line resources. Topics addressed include microbiology, gene sequencing and expression, testing technology, statistics, ethics, legal issues, team management, technical communications, problem solving strategies and the design process. We conduct on-line discussions and provide a wealth of resources via our course website.

This course is highly challenging and demanding, and our expectations are high. However, students who take the challenge seriously have the opportunity to experience that sense of achievement that comes from meeting and even exceeding their own expectations. For students interested in pursuing a degree in cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology, or biomedical engineering, this course is a must. Join us. We look forward to another high-powered semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 201 / AERO 201. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power.

Instructor(s): Colonel Douglas Goebel (elgato@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the development of aviation from the 18th century — a time of balloons and dirigibles — to the present, and examines how technology has affected the growth and development of air power. In addition, this course traces the use and development of air power through World War I and World War II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frances B Zorn (franzorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in a health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 21st century: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs, and the effects on the uninsured (43 million plus people) and the underinsured. We discuss issues related to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond — in writing and in class — to visitors, to reading materials, and to films.

A course pack containing the syllabus is required. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and writing assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor or a CSP counselor at CSP, G155 Angell, to receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Road, Ann Arbor (about a mile from campus; map available at CSP). Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term. Students who have conflicts with the Thursday evening meeting should not enroll in the class. This meeting is essential to the successful completion of the course, and the information is not available in a text book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 260. Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school science. Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students. (4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~uc260

Instructors:

  • Nicholas Steneck, Professor, History (Course Coordinator)
  • Sofia Merajver, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
  • Elizabeth Petty, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine
  • Janine Maddock, Assistant Professor, Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology
  • Edward Goldman, Attorney, Health System Attorney

Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences introduces students to the scientific, social, legal, and ethical dimensions of the life sciences through a close look at the use of genetic information in health decisions and testing for identity, such as crime detection. Following background lectures on different approaches to learning in law, natural science, social science, and the humanities, two case studies on health and identity testing will be explored in depth in lectures, discussion, and laboratories. A team assignment during the last half of the course will allow students to explore a related problem and present final recommendations to the class for comments and discussion.

Weekly class time consists of two 75-minute lectures and a combined four-hour discussion/laboratory. Discussion (1 hr) meets every week. The laboratory portion (3 hrs) meets seven times during the term. During the lab periods, students learn how to study DNA using PCR and to use PCR to solve a crime. Throughout the term, students also work as part of a small team charged with developing a digital-media presentation that will inform the public about a controversial issue in the life sciences.

The course is team-taught by a scientist, two physicians, a lawyer, and a humanist/historian. Students also work with graduate student instructors and undergraduate mentors, who work with the digital project teams. For more information, check the course website at http://www.umich.edu/~uc260.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 261 / PSYCH 231. Brain, Learning, and Memory.

Section 001 — There will be three evening exams, 6-8 pm, on 9/22, 10/15, 11/17.

Instructor(s): Stephen A Maren (maren@umich.edu) , John Jonides (jjonides@umich.edu) , Hylan Moises (moises@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students. (4). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey integrative and cellular aspects of neuroscience with a focus on the neural mechanisms of learning and memory. It will include both a lecture and laboratory component. There are three modules, each to be taught by different faculty. The modules will each integrate knowledge of methodology, basic neuroscience, and the application of these to learning and memory. The modules are clinical neuropathology and neuroimaging, animal models of learning and memory, and synaptic and cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. The intent of each module is to present an integrative picture of the organization and function of learning and memory systems in both simple and complex nervous systems. Specific topics will include nonassociative learning (habituation and sensitization) in invertebrates, associative conditioning of motor and emotional responses in vertebrates, genetics of learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and learning, molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory, quantitative and computation models of synaptic plasticity and learning, cognitive neuroimaging of human learning and memory, and clinical neuropathology of learning and memory in humans. The topics of the course will span many levels of biological organization from behavior to genomic regulation. Only first- and second-year undergraduates may enroll.

Readings will be assigned from Memory: From Mind to Molecules (Squire and Kandel), and a course pack. Grades will be based on three examinations and six laboratory reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 264 / CDB 264 / PHYSICS 264 / PSYCH 241. Introduction to Sensory Systems: Sound, Hearing, and Deafness.

Section 001 — Meets with Engineering 195.056.

Instructor(s): Karl Grosh (grosh@umich.edu) , Kate Barald (kfbarald@umich.edu) , John Middlebrooks (jmidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/engr/195/056.nsf

Our ability to communicate through speech and music is an integral part of what defines us as human. When functioning normally, the dynamic range and sensitivity of mammalian hearing is unrivalled by manmade devices. In this class, we give a systematic presentation of the mechanisms by which sound is converted to information in the brain, how those mechanisms can fail, and current-day and potential treatments for hearing problems. Topics include: concepts in acoustics, an introduction to relevant anatomy, pitch perception, speech perception, species-specific specialization of auditory systems (such as bat biosonar). We will also discuss aspects of molecular and cellular inner ear development, the neurobiology of hearing and deafness, deafness genes and gene therapy approaches, and the evolution of hearing organs. The cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis that allows the deaf to understand speech, will be discussed along with associated ethical issues. The commonality of the scientific method will be stressed. Lectures are introductory in nature. Coordinated laboratory assignments allow the students to measure sound, test their hearing, measure their speech, see the anatomy of the cochlea and discuss the ethics of gene therapy. Students with interests in music and acoustics as well as in biology, bioengineering, neuroscience and genetics should find this class of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 275. Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates.

Instructor(s): Andrew T. Miller (atmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Students must elect this course in both Winter Term and Fall Term to receive credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of UC 275, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Special fee required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Special fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GIEU is an interdisciplinary experiential introduction to intercultural learning that prepares diverse undergraduate students from various colleges for field experience interactions, and then helps students bring these experiences back to campus in socially and academically productive ways. It is a series of concentrated seminars of orientation, debriefing, and symposium.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

UC 280. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: First or second year standing, and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP sponsored activities, including bimonthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 — Latin America: The Colonial Period. LAC section in Spanish: Must be enrolled concurrently in HISTORY 347.004/ANTHRCUL 346.004 [Latin America: The Colonial Period].

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As part of Language Across the Curriculum, this one-credit section will be taught in Spanish. Students must be enrolled concurrently in Section 004 of HISTORY 347/ANTHRCUL 346 (Latin America: The Colonial Period).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

LAC section in Spanish: Must be enrolled concurrently in section 005 of History 312/AmCult 312 (History of Latinos in the U.S.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 402 / MILSCI 402. Military Professionalism and Professional Ethics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Army OEP chair. (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores concepts of military professionalism and relates these concepts to issues in military ethics, conduct of military operations, and national security. Contemporary military leadership issues are explored. Selected professional development topics also are addressed to facilitate the transition from cadet to lieutenant. Standards of conduct governing Army personnel are presented to inform cadets of expected and proper behavior while in the service of the military. The 90 minute laboratory places the senior student in positions of leadership.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department chair

UC 490. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 — Franz Kafka in Context.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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