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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Music History and Musicology


This page was created at 7:02 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


It is possible for LS&A students to elect a concentration program in Theatre or Music, and these programs are described in the LS&A Bulletin. In addition, Theatre courses and Music courses are frequently elected by LS&A students not concentrating in either Music or Theatre. All courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, and Music Theory are electable for LS&A credit; some but not all Theatre and Drama courses are available for LS&A credit. Some of these courses can be used in an area distribution plan. LS&A students may elect music PERFORMANCE courses for degree credit, but this credit counts toward the maximum twelve non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward an AB/BS degree or twenty non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward a BGS degree.

Courses in Theatre, Music History/Musicology, Composition, Music Theory, and Performing Arts Technology are listed in the Time Schedule under the School of Music.

The following courses count as LS&A courses for LS&A degree credit.


MUSICOL 139. Introduction to Music.

Instructor(s): Borders

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of musical concepts and repertories of the Western and non-Western world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 239. History of Western Art Music: Middle Ages through the Baroque.

Instructor(s): Borders

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

History of music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 341. Introduction to the Art of Music.

Instructor(s): Zak

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is designed for those who wish to sharpen their appreciation of music, whether they have any musical background or not. It begins with the fundamentals of melody, rhythm, harmony, and texture, then surveys the heritage of Western art music, from the Baroque era to the present. We examine representative examples of opera and concerto, symphony and song, solo and chamber music, popular song and rock; but the listening skills developed in class are meant to be applied to virtually any kind of music. Such skills involve understanding conventions of musical expression and form, so that students learn to listen with appropriate expectations. Students attend three lectures and one discussion section per week. Tapes of assigned works are available for private study. Grades are based upon examinations, concert and listening reports, and participation in discussion sections. This is the first course suggested for the LS&A concentration in music.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 343. Music and Islam.

Instructor(s): Becker

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the unity and diversity of musical customs from the Muslim cultures of the Middle East, central Asia, north India, and Indonesia. We will investigate musical systems in terms of instruments, repertoire, modal and rhythmic structures, and the effects of religious constraints, cultural policy and social history on musical life. The course will begin with a brief introduction to Islam: its basic philosophical tenets and its relationships to both Judaism and Christianity. We will study the definitions of 'musica' and will examine the concepts of 'halal', 'mubah', and 'haram' — how these terms relate to musical expression and how they are continually renegotiated by musicians and their audiences. Pan-Islamic phenomena such as Qur'anic recitation and 'dhikr' (a musical service including chants, songs, and dance) will be encountered in different guises throughout the course. Genres that are unique to particular Muslim regions, such as 'ghazal' and 'gamelan', will be discussed in relation to their different histories and relationship to religious thought. Included in the course will be discussions of Muslim traditions such as the Sufis of Turkey and north India, the Druze of Lebanon and Syria, the "classical" traditions of north India and much of the music of Indonesia — musical communities that have never abided by the most legalistic interpretations of the Qur'an concerning musical expression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 345. The History of Music.

Instructor(s): Clague

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of music history for students with interests in music, the humanities, or cultural history. It begins with chant and early secular songs of chivalry. The course traces the development of Western attitudes toward polyphony, notation, performance, and compositional techniques. Cultural history is an important subtheme, and we sample works associated with medieval castles and churches as well as Renaissance courts and controversies involving religions. Studies conclude with Baroque repertories, culminating in the music of Handel and Bach. No musical background necessary. Lecture format. Assignments consist of readings and listening to prepared cassettes. Rudiments of music will be presented so that students will be able to follow the notation of musical examples. The grade will be determined by two hour exams and a final exam. This course is a logical election for students who want to go on to Music History 346, an historical survey of music from 1750 to the present. It can serve as a two-course cognate requirement with MHM 341 or with MHM 346.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 405. Special Course.

Section 001 — Rock and Roll: The First Two Decades. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 505.001.

Instructor(s): Zak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At first it was simply an angle, a way of naming rhythm and blues for a wider and younger audience. But gradually rock and roll became a distinct music, with its own songs, stars, and sound. It was defined by an eclectic attitude, a burst of energy, and a minimal sense of history. Musical styles of many sorts were thrown together with little regard for established notions of taste or authenticity. Indeed, the improbable became an integral element of the rock and roll aesthetic. It seemed an infantile, throwaway music. Even many of its stars were certain that it wouldn't last. This course explores the beginnings of rock and roll in the 1950s and its continued development in the 1960s, an era whose music has in fact had a lasting and profound cultural influence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 405. Special Course.

Section 002 — National Style, Cultural Institutions, and Globalization: A View from Russia. Meets with REES 405.001.

Instructor(s): Arthur R Greene

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore changing conceptions of the world due to globalization and their effects on institutions of art and culture in Russia. Centered around eight musical performances offered by a variety of world-class artists at U-M during the semester and the campus visits of Valery Gergiev, it will include advance study of the works to be performed and post-concert discussions. (Credit will be awarded for attending various events.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

MUSICOL 406. Special Course.

Section 001 — Western Music, 1850-1900. [credits?] Meets with MUSICOL 506.001.

Instructor(s): Wiley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Western Art Music, 1850-1900' investigates the principal advances of the period in opera, orchestral music, selected additional genres, and post-romanticism. Among the operas considered are Wagner's Die Walküre, Verdi's Aïda, Musorgsky's Boris Godunov, and Tchaikovsky's Evgenii Onegin; among the orchestral works, Brahms' First Symphony, Tchaikovsky's Fifth, and Mahler's Second. Grading factors: two midterm examinations and a final (MUSICOL 406).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 408. Special Course.

Section 001 — Beethoven's Music. [credits?] Meets with MUSICOL 508.001.

Instructor(s): Whiting

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course surveys Beethoven's music in the appropriate stylistic, biographical, historical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis will fall on the analysis and interpretation of finished works (rather than sketch studies and "compositional genesis"). Weekly reading assignments will supplement the lectures and introduce students to the breadth of approaches taken in current Beethoven scholarship. The textbook will be Maynard Solomon's Beethoven (second, revised edition, 1998), available at Shaman Drum. While the course is designed primarily for undergraduate and graduate students in music, non-music concentrators who can follow scores and are acquainted with the rudiments of music theory will also be welcome. Grades will be based on in-class participation, an analytical essay (10-12 pages), and one examination (final).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 413. History of Opera: 17th and 18th Centuries.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 513.001.

Instructor(s): Stein

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is devoted to the study of opera in the first two centuries of its existence, from its beginnings just before 1600 to nearly the end of the 18th century. Here opera is to be studied critically as music, as theater, as spectacle, as performance medium, and as cultural expression. While some of the lectures and listening assignments will be organized around excerpts, others will be designed to focus on whole operas, their musical dramaturgy, historical significance, economics, modes of production, and impact and reception in performance. Composers to be studied include Monteverdi, Cavalli, Lully, Purcell, Hidalgo, A. Scarlatti, Handel, Vivaldi, Rameau, Gluck, Sarti, Piccinni, Mozart, and Haydn. The assignments in this course will be primarily listening assignments, to be supplemented by score study, readings from the course pack or materials on reserve, and some in-class performances. Grades will be based on written work and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 450. Music in the United States.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 550.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Music in the United States" is open to both undergraduates and graduate students. The goal of the course is to offer an overview of music's development in what is now the United States of America, beginning in the 1500s and extending to the present, and to examine the function of music in American life. Recognizing that courses on American classical music, jazz, rock and roll, musical theatre, and African American music are already taught in the School of Music, and that many American genres are part of virtually every student's experience, the instructor has designed this course with the hope of illuminating connections among these and other kinds of American music, as well links among the musical traditions of Europe, Africa, and North America. By looking at the whole of American music history in a single course, we can observe continuities and disjunctions that might otherwise go unnoticed.

This course will use UM emeritus professor Richard Crawford's textbook, An Introduction to America's Music, and its accompanying CD set (available at Shaman Drum Books). Taking performance, rather than composition, as its primary focus, the book examines five centuries of music making on the North American continent.

Course work will center on reading, close listening, musical and cultural analysis, discussion, class performances, and group projects, including development of the "Living Music" web-pages for the School of Music's American Music Institute. Students will be asked to write a number of short papers. There will be weekly quizzes, but no exams. Graduate students, in addition to the regular assignments, will write a term paper on a topic of their choice, selected in consultation with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for MUSICOL.


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