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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Core


This page was created at 7:35 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 — Daemons, Princes and Saints: Views of Love Across the Disciplines.

Instructor(s): David Burkam (dtburkam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The minute I heard my first love story
I started looking for you, not knowing
How blind that was.
Lovers don't finally meet somewhere.
They're in each other all along.
[From The Essential Rumi.]

The notion of love — romantic, sacred, or profane — has long captured the critical minds and creative talents of authors, artists, psychologists, biologists, and self-help gurus. In this seminar, we will sample from the wide range of personal and academic responses to this essentially-human emotion. Among the views of love we may explore are:

  1. the troubadours & courtly love,
  2. the theme of the demon lover,
  3. love in myth and fairy tales,
  4. sacred love and union with the Divine,
  5. eastern views of love,
  6. gay & lesbian love from myth and contemporary sources, and
  7. the psychological and biological foundations of love.

Course readings will be selected from a wide variety of sources in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We will read parts of Denis de Rougemont's now-classic historical book, Love in the Western World, and John Haule's updated perspective in Pilgrimage of the Heart. We will read short stories by Olive Schreiner, Shirley Jackson, Simeon Solomon, and O. Henry, and the poetry of Rumi and Omar Khyam. We'll read love letters and novels (May Sarton's The Small Room and C.S. Lewis' Till We Have Faces). We'll look at two "advice books" from the 1940s: How to Get Along with Girls, and How to Get Along with Boys. Selections from Diane Ackerman's A Natural History of Love and Arthur Janov's The Biology of Love will introduce us to the "science of love." Finally, we will glimpse at how psychologists and sociologists monitor our love-behavior with such social science research articles as: Love on the Internet: Involvement and Misrepresentation in Cyberspace vs. Realspace; Choosing a Mate in Television Dating Games: The Influence of Setting, Culture, and Gender; and Dating Experiences of Bullies in Early Adolescence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 — Culture and Politics in Brazil.

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Brazil is known internationally for its rich multi-ethnic cultural production. In this course, we will explore a few of the elements of Brazilian culture that are most evident to outsiders such as samba music, carnival, and the martial arts form, capoeira, as well as the ways these relate to issues such as working class politics, democratization, and family and sexuality. We will take both an academic and a hands-on approach to these issues. Students will analyze scholarly and other writing on the history and social meanings of different forms of cultural production, and attend a performance, film, or a workshop by Brazilian visiting artists. Short written assignments will be completed for each activity. In addition to class activities, each student will choose an element of Brazilian culture to research over the course of the term and will present the results at the end of the term, both in writing and as an individual or group performance or oral presentation.

The class will meet three times a week from Sept 2 to November 3, 2003. The final paper will be due November 17, 2003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003 — Philosophy.

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to explore a wide range of challenging intellectual materials, extending from the classical works of Kant and Marx to current controversies, and from philosophical autobiography and drama to social science and law. We will read a different book each week, write about it, and discuss it thoroughly. Many short papers will be written by each student; these papers will serve as the focal points of our seminar meetings. The reading and writing demands on each student will be very substantial. A two-fold purpose will guide our study of each work: first, to clarify and grasp the theoretical issues it presents, and second, to search for the pleasure, intellectual and aesthetic, it may provide.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 004 — The Nature of the Beast.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Speaking with an admiration akin to awe, Hamlet says, "What a piece of work is a man! How infinite in faculties! In form and moving how express [precise] and admirable! In action how like an angel! In apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world, the paragon of animals!" In Mark Twain's The Mysterious Stranger, however, when someone calls a sadistic act "bestial", Satan points out that only man takes pleasure in cruelty; no animal does. In this academic term, we are going to examine and write about some of the qualities, admirable and frightening, that constitute human nature; our guides will be artists and thinkers who have analyzed and come to conclusions about our natures. Here are some of the topics we will address: "The Value and Limits of Being Reasonable;" "Faith and Atheism;" "Is This an Ordered, Purposeful Universe?"; "The Forces Beneath our Civilized Veneer;" "How Responsible are We?" "What is beyond Conventional Morality?".

You will write a variety of papers. Some will analyze the works we have read or seen; some will analyze your own experiences; one will be an exam. The final, long paper will consist of an essay or short story which pursues in depth a facet of our study.

The books and films we will read or see will be chosen from the following:

  • Euthyphro, The Apology, Crito, Plato
  • Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift
  • Beyond Good and Evil, Freidrich Nietzsche
  • Civilization and Its Discontents, Sigmund Freud
  • The Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
  • Aunt Dan and Lemon, Wallace Shawn
  • Mother Night, Kurt Vonnegut
  • The Seventh Seal, Ingmar Bergman
  • Notes From Underground, Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 005 — Russian Film/Russian Life.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we will consider different aspects of Russian history, culture, and life by watching films and by reading various accompanying texts (historical accounts, short stories, analytical articles). There will sometimes be dramatic differences between the films and the written texts. This is to be expected since these "sources" will have been created at different times and for different purposes. In the process, we will learn not only about Russia, but also about the way "reality" is represented, whether in a work of art (fiction, film) or in "history." Representations can never be entirely objective — they have their own contexts, creators, sometimes external political constraints, and motivations.

The films we will watch and discuss cover a variety of periods: medieval Russia, the 19th century, the Russian Revolution, the 1920s period of economic and social reform, the Stalin years, World War II, Khrushchev and "the thaw," Gorbachev's era of openness (glasnost) and the post-Communist period of the 1990s. We will focus on a number of issues: class conflict, the roles of religion and of political ideology, intellectual freedom, ethnic tensions, the status of women, youth culture, and current economic problems. Some of the more well-known films we will study are Mother, Battleship Potemkin, Slave of Love, Bed and Sofa, Burnt By the Sun, Cranes Are Flying, Andrei Rublev, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Little Vera, Taxi Blues, Prisoner of the Mountains, The Thief, and Brother. There should be some lively discussions in which I hope you will all participate actively.

At the same time that we will be doing all of this, you will be working on becoming more effective writers. Each week there will be a film to see and a text to read. You will be expected to do a short paper, a paper revision, or a part of a longer paper almost every week. You will be getting detailed feedback on your writing throughout the term, and by its end you can expect to be a significantly better writer than when you started out. Evaluations for the course will be based not only on your papers, but on your contributions to class discussion as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 006 — Creative Composition and the Neuropsychology of Language.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey E Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A priority of first year seminar is expository writing, the writing you commonly are asked to do in college. Besides writing a lot, in this seminar writing is also our topic. In particular we will ask:

  • What creative processes are at work when we compose that make writing effective, that allow us to communicate what we mean?
  • How can strategies such as pacing our work, keeping a journal, working with peers, help us think and write more creatively and more effectively?
  • How can knowledge of classical formulas for effectiveness in language (rhetoric, logic) help us to be more creative?

To approach these central questions, we will also need to ask more fundamental ones:

  • How do words form in our minds?
  • What are the links between writing, reading, speaking, and thinking?
  • How do details of our lives affect the flow of thought?

To further illuminate our central interest in the creative process and effectiveness in writing, we will also ask how the brain is involved in the composing and communication of meaning. Is there a left brain for language and a right brain for non-language processes? How do verbal and nonverbal mental processes interact? How might brain substrates for logic and emotion interact in the creative process?

Selections from the following sources will likely be included on our reading list. Since this is a new course, the list is meant to be merely suggestive:

  • Peter Elbow, Writing with Power
  • Nancy Andreasen, Brave New Brain
  • James Adams, Conceptual Blockbusting
  • Edward Corbett, Classical Rhetoric
  • Stephen Toulmin, et. al., An Introduction to Reasoning
  • Mortimer Adler and Charles VanDoren, How to Read a Book
  • The New York Times series, "Writers on Writing"

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 007 — The Art of Biography.

Instructor(s): Leslie Stainton (stainton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rccore/100/007.nsf

What is biography? How does it differ from autobiography? fiction? history? What makes a biography "successful"? Why do biographers choose particular subjects, and what happens between biographer and subject during the course of researching and writing a life? What do we learn from the reconstruction of a life in the context of its time?

In this seminar we will examine both historical and contemporary biographies with an eye toward defining the scope, purpose, and technique of life-writing. We will briefly trace the evolution of biography, from Boswell through Lytton Strachey to such superb 20th-century biographers as Paul Murray Kendall, Leon Edel, Richard Ellmann, Diane Johnson, Richard Holmes, and Stephen B. Oates. Drawing in part on essays by Edel, Holmes, and others, and in part on readings from exemplary biographies, we will identify those components critical to successful life-writing: graphic scenes, telling quotations, apt details, insightful character development, keenly rendered interpersonal relationships, dramatic narrative sweep. We'll also look at shorter pieces of life-writing by such contemporary authors as Susan Orlean, Calvin Trillin, and Janet Malcolm.

Along the way, you will have the opportunity to practice these techniques through a series of short papers exploring specific aspects of biography, including scene writing, character conception, and personality and physical description. In addition, you'll interview a person of your choice and write a brief portrait of that individual. For your final paper, you'll write a 10-15 page "biography," which may be a broad portrait of an entire life or a more detailed depiction of a particular "chapter" in a given life. We will devote much of the second half of the semester to researching, writing, and revising your final papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 008 — An Investigation into Literature and Disease.

Instructor(s): Erica Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The feverish pulse, exotic passion and heightened sensibility, associated with certain infectious diseases, have held a wide-spread fascination for Western literature. In this seminar we will study the contextual role and cultural effect of diseases like TB, Cholera, Plague, Cancer, Aids, and others. We will read a number of representative works of fiction by Pratoloini, Gide, Epson, Camus, Dumas fils, and Mann in which an element of disease plays a major role. We will supplement our readings with filmed adaptations, opera and theater. Participants will be asked to initiate and lead class discussions, take part in a reading-performance of Epson's play Wit and write a number of essays in a variety of styles on text-related topics. There will be no final examination. Instead, students are asked to turn in a finished portfolio of their written work at the end of term.

These books will be read in the following order:

  • FAMILY CHRONICLE by Pratolini
  • THE IMMORALIST by Andre Gide
  • WIT by Margaret Epson
  • THE PLAGUE by Albert Camus
  • THE LADY OF THE CAMELIAS by Alexandre Dumas fils
  • DEATH IN VENICE by Thomas Mann

Books can be purchased at: SHAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP, 313 South State Street.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 009 — Inside the Dramatic Process: Image of the American Family.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Theatre is one of the most collaborative art forms. Often playwrights have also been theatre practitioners, and their experience is integral to the plays they write. Many students have been trained to read plays as they would novels or stories, without the awareness of performance that makes the plays spring to life as they would on stage. The goal of this seminar is to make better readers and interpreters of dramatic literature and better audiences for the theater. It is also geared to those students who would have a real interest in theatre as performers and directors.

During the term we will act as a repertory company approaching every dramatic text as a potential production. Students will have the opportunity to act, direct, and design. This production emphasis will be accompanied by a thorough interpretive study of the text as well. In this way, your analytical skills will be enhanced by your experience "inside the dramatic process."

This year we will be exploring American plays which deal with the important theme of family. We will be reading classics of the American stage by Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, and Sam Shepard as well as examining the changing image of the American family through the work of contemporary African-American, Asian-American, and Latino writers and playwrights from the Gay and Lesbian community.

Writing assignments will include short essays of an analytic nature, and several creative assignments, including an original play. You will have the opportunity to write as an actor and director and do research as a dramaturge. You will also do at least one performance critique. Written work will average five pages per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 010 — Visual Media, Emergent Culture, and Individual Inquiry.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics, readings, and discussion in this seminar originate from the intensely stimulating, often startling, technology-rich environment that we are now inhabiting. In this course, we primarily investigate meanings and messages to be derived from photography, television, and film. In the academic world, to be sure, we remain primarily concerned with words, so you are expected to write (and often revise) numerous papers designed to sharpen and extend your expressive, analytic, and research abilities. Papers and presentations to the class are intended to encourage you to articulate your individual impressions and ideas eloquently, precisely, and effectively in written language. Nonetheless, surrounding us are many differing forms of discourse, other than writing, competing for our attention. Our purpose here is to become increasingly alert to and knowledgeable about sources meanings and interpretations of those messages. We extend our analytic awareness and judgment by closely deciphering and reconsidering multiple, often intersecting, forms and styles of communication that influence our ways of knowing, all the while exploring our own belief systems, personal preferences and values, and cultural perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 011 — Nietzsche: Philosopher of Nihilism and Psychologist of the Fascist Personality.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the history of Western thought and culture, Nietzsche remains one of the most original, courageous, and discomforting thinkers. As the father of 19th-century nihilism and 20th-century existentialism, he proclaimed: "God is dead. We have murdered him," and then proceeded to uncover a vision of existence as purposeless, empty, and incomprehensible. With his corrosive skepticism, he undermined all traditional and unquestioned absolutes and values: bourgeois morality, science and reason, Christianity, democracy, etc. — all viewed as fraudulent attempts to mask a void, a nothingness yawning beneath man's daily life. But Nietzsche not only diagnosed the pathology and decadence of modern civilization, his philosophy also contained a visionary and prophetic impulse designed to lead man beyond the despair, triviality, and meaninglessness of contemporary life. A new form of purely secular redemption would be achieved by the self-affirming "individual" driven by the "Will to Power" to create a personal meaning in a meaningless world. Readings: Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy, Thus Spake Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, The Anti-Christ, Hitler, My Struggle (Mein Kampf, selections); texts of other Nazi intellectuals; and the Constitution of the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 013 — Tradition and Innovation in Classic Modernism: Picasso, Nietzsche, Eliot.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The period of Classic Modernism, extending from the 1870s to the 1950s, initiated a truly radical challenge to traditional representational forms in literature, the visual arts, and philosophy. The mimetic project, or the idea that art must provide an increasingly accurate and complex picture of the world at large, collapsed. In place of this venerable commitment, artists, writers, and thinkers sought innovative and often threatening engagements with their material. What we understand as the "avant-garde" describes the practices of attack, repudiation, even destruction that characterized the production of culture in this period.

At the same time, a re-discovery of "tradition" in the art and thought of the past accompanied the most radical experiments. Ideas concerning the value of tradition, its contemporary relevance, and even its necessity were explored. This course will probe the intricate relation between tradition and radical innovation in the early avant-garde. Our major reference points in this interdisciplinary course will be the painting of Picasso, the poetry of T.S. Eliot, and the philosophy of Nietzsche.

  • Henry James Daisy Miller
  • John Singer Sargent painting

  • T.S. Eliot Early poetry
  • Picasso The Blue and Rose periods

  • Gertrude Stein Picasso
  • Picasso Portrait of Gertrude Stein

  • Friedrich Nietzsche The Birth of Tragedy

  • Alfred Jarry Ubu Roi
  • Picasso The Demoiselles d'Avignon

  • T.S. Eliot The Waste Land
  • Picasso Cubism

  • T.S. Eliot The Four Quartets

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 014 — Writing and Performing Indonesian Gender.

    Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The aim of this course is to investigate gender roles in modern Indonesian society as seen in selected literary and musical traditions. My focus will be on how the two sexes interact in marriages, family, and society in two ethnic groups: the Javanese and Angkola Batak. We will examine who has more power — men or women — and how power is defined — through social status, prestige, wealth, or spirituality. Have gender relations changed in the 20th century and are they different in the various classes of Indonesian society? How are Western ideals of female sexuality transforming the ways traditional Javanese singers perform, dress, and behave? Does the religion of a group influence gender relations? The literary works under examination will include This Earth of Mankind, a novel about early twentieth-century Java by Pramoedya Ananta Toer, said to be "Indonesia's greatest novelist;" Sitti Djaoerah, a novel about a young couple growing up in Sumatra in the early twentieth century, and a modern experimental play. We will examine the role of the two sexes in the following musical traditions: the Central Javanese gamelan orchestra, the sacred court bedhaya dance, a tradition of street singers (tayuban), and Sumatran vocal music.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 015 — Affirmative Action.

    Instructor(s): Thomas E Weisskopf (tomw@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rccore/100/015.nsf

    Affirmative action, in the sense of preferences for members of certain disadvantaged racial/ethnic groups, is a controversial issue in most of the countries of the world in which it is practiced. It is controversial because it engages an inherent tension between two basic goals that are widely, and often passionately, espoused: equal treatment of every individual and reduced inequality across social groups. In many countries, debates over affirmative action policies in education and in employment have become sharper in recent times. This is certainly true in the United States. Indeed, our own University is the focal point of lawsuits that have reached the US Supreme Court; and the Court is expected to issue a decision this summer that will determine whether or not admissions policies in universities across the country can continue to take account of applicants' racial/ethnic identity.

    In this seminar we will address affirmative action (AA) in a variety of contexts and from a variety of perspectives. We will consider AA not only in the United States but also in India, where various forms of AA have been practiced for almost a century. We will draw on readings from many different fields — history, philosophy, law, politics and economics — and we will also read some personal narratives and view some films. As we study this controversial topic, we will remain respectful of people's differing opinions. Our aim will not be to achieve consensus on any particular view of AA. Rather, we will seek to develop greater understanding of its origins, characteristics and consequences in a variety of settings; and we will familiarize ourselves with arguments made both in support of and in opposition to AA. We will also consider how the University of Michigan might best respond to the Supreme Court ruling, whatever it proves to be. In studying these issues, we will explore our own values and belief systems as we learn to understand better the perspectives of others.

    This course also serves as an introduction to the RC approach to learning, which emphasizes critical thinking, interactive discussion and sustained writing. I will therefore expect all students to participate actively in our twice-weekly class meetings (and in occasional out-of- class activities). You should plan to spend as much time writing as you do reading for the course, since you will be expected to submit written assignments at least every two weeks throughout the semester. Some of these assignments will ask you to summarize readings; some will call for your response to a reading or a film; and others will ask you to reflect on your own life experiences and perceptions. Most of your writing assignments will be expository; and I will place a very high premium on logical reasoning and clarity of exposition, which are closely related.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 016 — Medicine and Health: East and West.

    Instructor(s): Barbara M Sloat (bsloat@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this seminar we will examine western understandings of health and disease in the light of other cultural traditions of health and healing. We will study the concepts, assumptions, and methodologies that underlie modern western biomedicine and science, and consider their implications for practitioners and patients. We will spend an equal amount of time examining the complex, centuries-old medical systems of Tibet and India. How and to what extent can we gain an understanding of these classical Asian approaches to health and healthcare that seem so different from our own? Can these traditions inform one another? Will current revolutions in fields such as molecular genetics, immunology, and psychoneuroimmunology serve to further separate or help integrate modern and age-old understandings of health and self? The very views we hold of ourselves as humans are profoundly influenced by what happens in the realms of western science and medicine. This seminar proposes that a study of the human and structural aspects of alternate medical traditions will not only inform us, it will also allow us to explore the larger cultural myths that help define our modern worldview.

    Articles, essays, books, film and guest speakers will form the rich bases for our discussions and writing. Readings will include a course pack of essential readings available at the beginning of the term, and selections from several books, all available in paperback: The Limits of Medicine, E.S. Golub; Why We Get Sick, R. M. Nesse & G.C. Williams; The Lost Art of Healing, B. Lowen; In Search of the Medicine Buddha, D. Crow; Ayurveda, The Science of Self-healing, V. Lad, and others. Writing assignments will consist of weekly short papers (with an emphasis on revision), frequent commentary papers, and a longer project and presentation at the end of the term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    RCCORE 105. Logic and Language.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (MSA). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Argument is the focus of this course, both in symbols and in language. We deal with the forms of arguments, the application of them, what makes them valid or invalid, weak or strong. We do this in two concurrent ways, microcosmically and macro-cosmically.

    Microcosmically, we examine the structure of arguments, what makes them tick. In the deductive sphere we deal with the relations of truth and validity to develop the logic of propositions, and enter the logic of quantification. In the inductive sphere, we deal with argument by analogy, and causal analysis, and with elementary probability theory.

    Macro-cosmically, we do the analysis of real arguments in controversial contexts, as they are presented in classical and contemporary philosophical writing: ethical arguments (in Plato); political arguments (in J.S. Mill); and legal arguments as they appear in Supreme Court decisions. In all cases, both substance and form are grist for our mill.

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    RCCORE 150. Elementary French.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 151. Elementary German.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 154. Elementary Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 190. Intensive French I.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 100, 101, 102, or 103.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rccore/190/001.nsf

    The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

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    RCCORE 191. Intensive German I.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or 103.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/courseweb.htm

    The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

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    RCCORE 193 / RUSSIAN 103. Intensive First-Year Russian.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, 111, or 112.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/services.html

    See Russian 103.

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    RCCORE 194. Intensive Spanish I.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Lourdes Cornejo-Krohn

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 101, 102, or 103.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic but solid knowledge of Spanish morphology and syntax, functional vocabulary, and practice in speaking and writing. The lecture gives a thorough introduction to Spanish grammatical structures as used in cultural contexts, and students meet in small discussion groups in the afternoon to practice this material in a more focused, intensive manner. Upon completion of this course students will be able to understand simplified written texts or short oral passages without the aid of a dictionary. Students will also be able to carry on a short, elementary conversation.

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    RCCORE 195 / LATIN 195. Intensive Latin I.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gina Marie Soter (soter@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course meets for two hours per day and covers in one academic term the equivalent of two terms at the level of a non-intensive first-year collegiate course. During this term, students will learn the essential morphological, grammatical, and syntactical structures of Latin, and will build a basic vocabulary of the language. Through readings and discussion students will become acquainted with significant aspects of Roman history and culture.

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    RCCORE 205. Independent Study.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (1-8).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

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    RCCORE 209. Study Off-Campus.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (Arr).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

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    RCCORE 251. Intermediate German.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 254. Intermediate Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 290. Intensive French II.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 190. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

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    RCCORE 291. Intensive German II.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 191. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 231, or 232.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Intensive German II covers second-year German in one term. The goals of the course include review and expansion of the grammar and vocabulary presented in RCCORE 191 and further development of student's reading, writing, and speaking skills. As in the other RC German courses, all instruction is conducted in German. Classroom instruction includes discussions, impromptu speaking exercises, performance of skits, numerous writing assignments, and listening and reading exercises. Reading materials include short prose, fairy tales, poetry, and magazine and newspaper articles. A primary objective which RCCORE 291 students strive to meet is "passing proficiency". Achieving this goal gives students a sense of pride and accomplishment. The proficiency exam serves as a qualifying exam for the next required course in the sequence, RCCORE 321 (German Readings).

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    RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    RCCORE 294 is a second-year intensive course designed to achieve proficiency in Spanish. The lecture component emphasizes understanding of advanced grammatical structures and syntax, whereas the discussion is devoted to the critical analysis of authentic texts addressing issues relevant to Hispanic experiences in the United States. Through their interaction with the texts and instructors, both in formal and informal contexts, students develop their speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to read journalistic or academic prose with ease as well as write essays of an academic nature with a minimum of English interference.

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    RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

    Foreign Language

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): Solange Isabel Munoz (solangem@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    RCCORE 294 is a second-year intensive course designed to achieve proficiency in Spanish. The lecture component emphasizes understanding of advanced grammatical structures and syntax, whereas the discussion is devoted to the critical analysis of authentic texts addressing issues relevant to Hispanic experiences in the United States. Through their interaction with the texts and instructors, both in formal and informal contexts, students develop their speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to read journalistic or academic prose with ease as well as write essays of an academic nature with a minimum of English interference.

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    RCCORE 305. Independent Study.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (1-8).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    RCCORE 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (Independent). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is for the student who wishes experience in college teaching. The student-teacher functions as a teaching intern in a course. Regular staff meetings and individual conferences with the person in charge ensures that the intern shares in the overall planning and management of the course. The student may receive credit only once for student-teaching in the same course.

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    RCCORE 309. Study Off-Campus.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (Arr).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

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    RCCORE 310. Accelerated Review-French.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of Proficiency, as defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College," in the four linguistic skills. Students who take RCCORE 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course 290 to do so. "Accelerated Review-310" is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students.

    In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style.

    In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

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    RCCORE 311. Accelerated Review-German.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students who have not yet passed the German proficiency exam, but who do not require the 8-credit RCCORE 291 to prepare themselves for it. Assignments develop students' mastery of the four skills and improve facility and accuracy of grammar and vocabulary. The goals of this course are to lead student to an advanced intermediate level of proficiency and prepare them for RCCORE 321.

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    RCCORE 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Lourdes Cornejo-Krohn

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four academic terms of language but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this course is the discussion of primary source materials of a literary, cultural, and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency in listening and reading comprehension, language structure, and composition.

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    RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001 — Food and Culture — a French Perspective: Aspects de la culture française vus à travers la nourriture.

    Instructor(s): Carolyn Abderson-Burack (caburack@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Food has long been celebrated and enjoyed as an important aspect of French culture. What is the history of this cuisine? How are French attitudes towards food different from our own? How are the French protecting this part of their culture?

    We will also look into nutrition and health issues. Do the French have different ideas about what foods are considered "healthy"? What are their concerns about the safety of what they eat? What is the so-called "French paradox"?

    Through readings from a variety of sources, we will attempt to answer these and other questions. Readings will include selections from literary texts by authors such as La Fontaine, Baudelaire, Dumas, Maupassant, and Proust. Other readings will be current articles from newspapers and magazines such as France-Amérique and Sciences et Avenir. Readings, discussions and written work will be in French. Students will give two oral presentations and complete a final research project. Students will also prepare two French meals. Course evaluation will be based on both creative and analytical papers, oral presentations, class participation and preparation.

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    RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

    Foreign Language

    Section 002 — French on Stage: Humour, Amour et autre: Prévert et ses amis.

    Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Jacques Prévert's opus mirrors the changes and upheavals of the mid-20th century in France. Be it in his poems, film-scripts or songs, he helps us to trace and understand the social and artistic developments of his time: the Surrealist movement, the cubists, the advent of the first socialist government in France, the Second World War. His dedication to social justice, to the anti-war movement and (ahead of his time) to the protection of nature, colored by humor and a humanistic approach, permeates his writings, even his celebrated love poems. We will also read other poets (Aragon, Eluard) and prose-writers (Queneau, Allais) who tackled these questions in the same period.

    The course will draw on Prevert's and others' multi-faceted literary production as a support to introduce students to the historical background of that period; as a means to become acquainted with other artists of the time who were friends with Prévert (Picasso, Doisneau); and as a vehicle to help students to increase their knowledge of, and ease with, the language. Students will also select texts in prose to adapt for the stage.

    The final project will be a public performance, followed by a performance for high schools, relying on multi-media and the many talents of the participants (researching, performing, singing, illustrating, and helping with the multi-media presentation).

    Students taking this course must be prepared to come to all extra sessions and rehearsals. Final grade will take into account four papers, participation, progress, and performance.

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    RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001 — From Legend to Make-Believe.

    Instructor(s): Erica Kuhrash Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this seminar we will read a selection of fairy tales, folk-tales, legends, myths and fantastic stories from the German literary tradition. In our analyses and discussions we will focus on the elements of the fantastic in these tales and try to decode their hidden message. In connection with this, we will practice and fine-tune our various German language skills. Participants will be asked to compose a number of expository and creative essays in German.

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    RCCORE 323. Russian Readings.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001 — St. Petersburg: The City of Power, Mystery, and Human Tragedy.

    Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency in Russian (by RC standards). (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/services.html

    Offered as a part of a theme semester in celebration of the tricentennial anniversary of St. Petersburg's foundation, this course will explore Russia's and the world's fascination with this majestic and mysterious city, nicknamed "the Venice of the North" and "the other Russian capital". Created by the command of a single man as "Russia's window to Europe" at the expense of many human lives, this city has been the symbol of Russia's path to modernization and westernization, of the country's power, grandeur and decadence. It also became the center of the world's attention as the cradle of the Russian revolutions in 1917 and again when more than two million people died of starvation during the heroic siege of 1941-1943. The city's glamorous and tragic fate has fascinated many famous Russian artists, writers, poets and musicians, among them Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Gogol, Diagilev, and Shostakovich. In this course, we will examine the many faces of St. Petersburg through historical texts, belles lettres, journalism, tourist materials, travelers' tales, art, music, and film. Students will be expected to participate actively in class, compile a journal, write five two-to-three-page response papers, and to complete a final project combining oral presentation and a six-to-eight-page paper.

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    RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Section 001 — El teatro campesino.

    Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will be an introduction to the topic of migrant workers in the US and the artistic representation of their experiences through El Teatro Campesino. There will be a brief historical account of the migrant workforce in the U.S., specifically California. We will analyze the different economic and political forces that have shaped the migrant stream since the late 1900s, analyzing both the bracero program and its present H-2 worker program. Throughout this historical account there will be readings pertaining to individual experiences in health, education, and social contexts in order to gain a more complete understanding of the informal lifestyle of the migrant, and how it contrasts with the American institutional bureaucracy. This social and historical perspective will be complemented with plays from El Teatro Campesino, a forum in which this invisible and marginalized community gains control of their own voice and narrate their experiences. There is a possibility of a final public performance.

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    RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Section 002 — Visions of America: The (Un)Making of a "New World".

    Instructor(s): Samuel Sanchez-Sanchez (sanchezs@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rccore/324/002.nsf

    This course provides a global understanding of the various literary and visual representations of America from 1492 until the present. Since the arrival of the Spaniards, the "new world" has been (re)constructed by means of narratives that have shaped our modern concept of Latin America. The purpose of this course is to examine how these narratives develop during the Conquest, are consolidated in the colonial period and have been transformed since the independence of the first colonies up to the present time.

    First, we will approach this process of invention questioning its clichés, its myths, and its realities through the perspective of those who created it: sailors, soldiers, explorers, missionaries, educators, lawmakers, clerics, politicians, writers, and scientists. At the same time, we will reflect critically on the following questions: how are these narratives formed? What forces have enabled them? What has served as models for their creation? How do they relate to the reality they attempt to describe? Additionally, we will examine how several contemporary Latin American authors (G. García Márquez, Antonio Di Benedetto, Jorge Icaza y Alejo Carpentier, among others) have appropriated the legacy of these representations within their works. We will also examine diverse contemporary artistic manifestations in order to elucidate how these narratives have been integrated in our cultural system so that we can question in a broader way how they relate to our contemporary concept of Latin America.

    Readings for this course consist of a selection of texts that provide varying perspectives on the construction of America: navigation diaries, chronicles, letters, shipwreck accounts, and scientific reports. We will compare these readings with contemporary literary works and criticism, complemented by diverse audiovisual material (maps, murals, engravings, paintings, and movies). This group of readings will serve as a framework for interrogating some of the themes and notions that contributed to the (re)making of America: otherness, fantasy, utopia, nature, monstrosity, the noble savage, Fiction vs. History, and violence, among others.

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    RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Section 003 — Indigenous Literature: Oral Tradition and Indigenous Movements.

    Instructor(s): Maria Elizabeth Gonzalez (melizgon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course, we will read texts which represent a variety of creative, cultural, and social expression emerging from the indigenous populations of the Andean region focusing our attention on the indigenous problematic which becomes evident through these texts. We will begin by reading brief texts written by Jose Maria Arguedas and Cesar Vallejo. Through these authors we will be able to, from the outset, recognize the particularities of the indigenous problematic of this region. We will read Pre-Columbian indigenous literature which has been transcribed, translated into Spanish, and published. This reading will enable us to recognize similarities and differences between literary genres which emerge from an indigenous oral tradition and those which emerge from a Western literary tradition such as the short story, zarzuela, and poetry. After reckoning with this literary legacy, already translated into Spanish and therefore mediated, we will read texts from the oral tradition which are transmitted as local knowledge: stories and adivinanzas, fables and myths from diverse regions in the Andes whose contemporary published status reveal the persistence and importance of this tradition. We will pursue our questioning further by reading various texts whose ethnographic quality displaces our focus, from literary genres toward the narration of personal histories. The transcription and translation of these texts marks a change in the way in which indigenous literature continues to emerge from the social tension which Vallejo and Arguedas' texts signal. These texts will permit us to enter into the indigenous Andean reality from the point of view of indigenous testimony. Finally, we will read newspaper articles, essays, and other public pronouncements written by current indigenous intellectuals whose concerns project indigenous reality from the point of view of the indigenous movements which have just begun the labor of articulating their communal interests through their autonomous and determined participation in Andean society at large.

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    RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

    Foreign Language

    Section 004 — Topic?

    Instructor(s): Alvarez

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 001 — Modernism and Modernity in East Asian Literature. Meets with ASIAN 457.001.

    Instructor(s): Jonathan Zwicker (jzwicker@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/457/001.nsf

    See Asian Studies 457.001.

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    RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

    Written and Verbal Expression

    Section 002 — Grammar and Meaning. Meets with Linguistics 492.005.

    Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Enjoying your language classes?
    Just passed Proficiency?
    Thinking about learning another language?
    Or just plain interested in languages?

    Language students frequently remark that they never really understood English grammar until they learned another language. This course is designed to answer most basic questions about the English language, and languages in general, for undergraduate students in English, foreign languages, or linguistics.

    The course is an integrated summary of modern and traditional English grammar (morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics) and what is known about how grammar organizes communication, writing, and meaning, with considerable attention paid to the similarities and differences between the ways grammar and meaning operate in English and in other languages.

    It is a lab course, with projects in the syntax laboratory every Thursday (including data analysis, group editing, derivation tracing, rule construction, and other activities), to exemplify and highlight the topics discussed in lecture on Tuesdays.

    It may be counted towards a Linguistics major, and is recommended for those planning to take 'Grammar and Writing' in the Winter. It is open to all students (not only R.C. students), and there are no prerequisites, beyond a serious interest in language study.

    The textbook is The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language, available at Shaman Drum, plus course packs, at Excel.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    RCCORE 405. Independent Study.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

    Credits: (1-8).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    RCCORE 409. Study Off-Campus.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

    Credits: (Arr).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    RCCORE 410. Senior Project.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

    Credits: (1-8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    An individual project in the field of concentration.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    RCCORE 489. Honors Independent Research.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    An independent study under the supervision of an honors thesis advising committee to do preliminary research for a potential honors thesis. A primary purpose of this course is to determine if, in fact, the proposed thesis is feasible.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

    RCCORE 490. Honors Thesis.

    Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    An individual honors project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department


    Graduate Course Listings for RCCORE.


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