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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 7:36 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

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RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

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RCHUMS 236 / FILMVID 236. The Art of the Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 236.001.

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katri Evramaa (kervamaa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for Section 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 002 — [1 credit].

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for Section 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

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RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Frederic Behling

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will approach jazz as an improvisatory practice that has influenced developments in American art, fiction, and poetry. No musical expertise or prior coursework on jazz is required, though students are expected to have some familiarity with twentieth century art, literature, or music. Topics addressed will include the musical characteristics of jazz improvisation, theoretical issues related to musical improvisation, and the consideration of writers and painters who in some way make use of improvisation in their work. The course's interdisciplinary methodology will involve secondary texts from several disciplines including ethnomusicology, philosophical aesthetics, and literary theory, as well as musical performances and recordings, works of poetry and literature, paintings, and films of artistic and literary performances. Much of our attention will fall on music, art, and literature produced between the late 1940s and early 1980s though some more recent works will be included as well.

Course Goals:

  • To improve students' ability to listen to improvisation critically
  • To acquaint students with recent theories of musical improvisation
  • To understand the role of improvisation in American expressive practice

Required Materials:

  • Readings for this course are available in the course pack.
  • Listening examples are available on line or on reserve.

Listening Journals Before each class, you are required to submit in writing, via CourseTools, your reactions to the days reading and listening assignment. In these brief commentaries (250 — 500 words) you might consider the following:

  • What do I like or dislike about this music and why?
  • How do the theoretical issues we are studying help explain a particular recording, poem, story, or painting?
  • What is the form of the example being considered? How do its parts function?
  • In what way is the particular example improvisatory? How does thinking of this example as an improvisation alter your interpretation?

Performance Reports You are required to attend three improvisational performances outside of class and submit a two to three page essay about what you observe. One of the performances you attend must be a session of the Jazz Combo class. For this essay, consider the kind of preparation that goes into improvisational performance. Some other performances you might attend are workshops with guest artists in the Jazz and Improvisational Studies department, performances at any of the jazz venues in Ann Arbor or Detroit, improvisational theater, or poetry slams. See CourseTools for announcements of upcoming performances. These performances are intended to be pleasurable and I encourage students to attend them together so that you might better enjoy and discuss what you experience.

Research Paper and Presentation You are required to write an eight to ten page research paper on any topic involving improvisation and the arts. You may consider works by artists discussed in class or you may investigate other artists or art forms. Your research should include sources in addition to those discussed in class. Each student will give a ten-minute presentation on his or her research. I encourage students to make some kind of improvisational performance part of their presentation. Students working on related topics may give group presentations or performances with my approval

Examinations There will be two non-cumulative examinations.

Attendance: Since this class involves many presentations, attendance in required for all classes.

Grading

  1. Examination 1 15%
  2. Examination 2 15%
  3. Journals 15%
  4. Performance Reports 15%
  5. Presentation 10%
  6. Essay 20%
  7. Class Participation 10%
  8. Total 100%

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RCHUMS 252. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 — Studying and Playing Southeast Asian Music.

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/rchums/252/001.nsf

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions — all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, and animist traditions.

This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC. This course meets the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance, and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion, and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact has Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand? How do Indonesian youth transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present, and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma, and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings, and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from Western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as the Javanese do, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cycles are evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

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RCHUMS 252. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 002 — Afro-Cuban Music and Drumming.

Instructor(s): Michael Gould (gould@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Come and experience hands-on the drumming of Cuba. The class will learn the basics of conga playing, clave and other percussion instruments associated with Afro-Cuban music. The class will learn and play a variety of styles of Cuban music that will culminate in a small concert at the Residential College. Each student is expected to practice daily using a practice conga supplied by the instructor. Improvisation. Lab Fee $50.

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RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 — Residential College Singers.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RCHUMS 254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument.

Music

Section 001 — Basic Technique for Singers and Actors and the Alexander Technique.

Instructor(s): Jane R Heirich

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to students who want to develop their voices for speaking and singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed towards singers (with or without previous vocal training), speech and acting students, and those who want to find out if they can sing. Most voices are undeveloped or under-developed; and we can learn how to develop our vocal equipment for whatever our own purpose. Because our voices are housed within us, we must consider the whole voice-body-mind as the subject of our study.

Ms. Heirich is a STAT and AmSAT certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, and this work will inform all that we do in the course. The class meets together on Mondays and Fridays from 1-3 P.M. Your schedules should TEMPORARILY remain flexible between 12-6 on Wednesdays for scheduling of small group sessions. This scheduling will be completed by the end of the first class meeting.

There will be one required text, some optional readings, daily preparation, and an individual or team project required. LS&A guidelines for 4-credit courses expect 3 hours of work per credit hour, hence, you should be prepared accordingly. With more than 4 hours in "class" (a weekly average of 6.25 hours, which includes the small group and individual lessons), there will be proportionally less expected of you outside of class. The required reading will be Miracles Usually Can't Be Learned, a basic vocal text by Jane Heirich, available as a course pack.

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RCHUMS 260 / DANCE 220. The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history, criticism, and aesthetics. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth- and twentieth-century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film.

Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris.

Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet and we will also read some dance critics including Gautier, Levinson, Martin, and Croce. No prerequisites.

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RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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RCHUMS 309. Classical Sources of Modern Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 — The Heritage of Greece.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the confrontation between myth and philosophy which, from the 6th century BC on, structured the intellectual heritage of Greece. By myth is meant the fables of the poets, primarily Homer. One should not assume that these stories provide a clear window onto ancient religion; instead, the relation between mythology and religion was problematic and unstable. The philosophers, beginning with the presocratics, intervened disruptively in this problematic relation either to magnify the difficulty or to resolve it on their own terms. Philosophical speculation concerning the nature of space and the role of the gods in shaping or controlling space challenged mythology, but also had implications, sometimes troubling, for ancient religion — especially the rituals of prophecy and sacrifice. To contest these rituals was to challenge the site and expression not only of religious, but also, because of the imbrication of ancient cult and the state, of political power.

Power (simultaneously religious and political) in the ancient world, could be concentrated and disseminated by means of the image. Visual objects occupied a cultural category quite different from modern conceptions of "art". To what extent were ancient painting, sculpture, or architecture invested in religious, philosophical, or political models? Did they merely reflect or did they actively participate in the debate?

The "Greek tradition" in art, literature, and philosophy is conventionally understood as limited to its pagan expression. This course will take a somewhat wider view. The terms of that tradition — the literary forms, the philosophical preoccupations, the modes of visual representation, and the difficult status of the image — were in fact taken up not only be learned Jewish commentators and critics, but also by Christian intellectuals of the Byzantine period who viewed this tradition as their own. Their participation in and contribution to the Greek heritage deserves recognition.

  1. Space and design:

    • Homer, The Odyssey
    • Geometric pottery;
    • The Presocratic philosophers, especially Heraclitus and Parmenides

  2. Sacrifice and prophecy: the construction of sacred space:

    • Aeschylus, The Oresteia
    • Archaic sculpture; The Temple of Zeus at Olympia
    • Sophocles, Oedipus Rex
    • Classical sculpture: The Parthenon

  3. Sacred space: challenge and revision:

    • The Sophists
    • Euripides, Hecuba
    • Greek vase painting: the development of illusionism and the problem of empty space
    • Plutarch, The Decline of the Oracles

  4. Wisdom, images, idolatry: rethinking the heritage of Greece:

    • The Book of Wisdom
    • The Synagogue at Dura Europos
    • Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Macrina

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RCHUMS 313 / SLAVIC 313. Russian Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 003 ONLY satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 313.001.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 345. Weimar Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Weimar Republic, Germany's first experiment in democracy, lasted between 1918/19 and 1933. It began with the fall of the German monarchy at the end of World War I and ended a little more than fourteen years later when the National Socialist Party assumed power through a mixture of legal and illegal means. Although brief, the Weimar Republic witnessed a rich and diverse array of "high" and "popular" culture; including visual art, performance, sculpture, film, theater, literature, posters, illustrated books and magazines. Empowered by the breakdown of the established order, and with the firm belief that not only society but also the individual had to be remade from the ground up, the creators of Weimar culture engaged all the means at their disposal to visualize a new world and a new consciousness to go with it. This course will examine various competing visions of the new individual and new society as they are presented in Weimar Culture, and how fascist, socialist and democratic forces battled to define the modern individual and society.

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RCHUMS 347(451) / RUSSIAN 347. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Xavier Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 347.001.

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RCHUMS 360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him."
(Nietzsche)
"If there is not God, then everything is permitted."
(Dostoevsky)
"Everything that exists is born without reason,
Continues to live out of weakness,
And dies by chance."
(Sartre)

Existentialism combines the investigation of major issues in the history of Western philosophy with daily problems of intense personal concern. In this course, existentialism will be viewed as a literary as well as philosophical movement united by a number of recurrent and loosely related themes:

  1. Theological: the disappearance of God; the condition of being "thrown" into an indifferent and ultimately absurd universe; man's encounter with nothingness beneath the floor of everyday reality revealed when familiar objects and language drop away.
  2. Psychological: man's imperfection, fragility, and loneliness; the feeling of anxiety and despair over the emptiness of life and the terror of death; arguments for and against suicide; human nature as fundamentally ambiguous and hence not explicable in scientific thought or in any metaphysical system; the absence of a universally valid morality; and human nature as undetermined and free.
  3. Social: man's rebellion against the inhumanity of social institutions that suffocate the "authentic self"; the escape from individual responsibility into the "untruth of the crowd."
  4. Finally, man's various attempts to transform nihilistic despair into a creative affirmation of life.

Philosophic texts by Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Buber; fiction by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Camus, Sartre, and Kafka. Two examinations and one term paper required. Permission of the instructor is NOT required for this course.

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RCHUMS 389. The Modern Theatre.

Drama

Section 001 — Post-Colonial English Language Drama.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This version of the course will focus on plays by "First Nation" people in North America and the Pacific, all originally written and performed in English. These works will examine, in one form or another, the problems of colonialism, racism, minority identity vs. the dominant culture's representations, and traditional or "tribal" values vs. the modern world. Excursions into post-colonial cultural theory will inform extensive, stage-oriented exploration of the plays and evaluation of their contribution to contemporary drama. Short critical papers, individual research into other relevant playwrights and participation in a culminating performance project are the principal requirements. Among the playwrights to be covered are:

Native American: Hanay Geiogomah, Diane Glancy, William Yellow Robe, Donald Two-Rivers. Native Canadian: Tomson Highway, Daniel David Moses, Drew Hayden Taylor. Australian Aboriginal: Jack Davis. Pacific Islander: Briar Grace-Smith (Maori), John & Victoria Kneubuhl (Hawaiian).

Selections from "First Nations" poetry and short fiction, as well as films (from Chris Eyre's Smoke Signals to Philip Noyce's Rabbit-Proof Fence), will supplement the study of the dramatic works. A November field-trip to NATIVE EARTH THEATRE in Toronto to attend a production and meet with Native Canadian theatre artists will also be featured.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 444. George Balanchine and the Transformation of American Dance.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 260 or 235 or DANCE 220; Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the life and works of George Balanchine and his influence on twentieth century dance in Europe and America. As a choreographer, Balanchine has been compared to Shakespeare in the depth and scope of his work and has been ranked with Picasso and Stravinsky as one of the titans of twentieth century arts. Balanchine's life (1904-1983) spanned the major part of the century. His life took him from Tsarist Russia, through the 1917 Revolution and then to Europe and America (1933-83). He absorbed influences from the late nineteenth century Franco-Russian classical ballet at the Russian Imperial Ballet Theatre where he was trained as a boy, experienced and contributed to the artistic ferment surrounding the October revolution, participated in the modernist innovations in London and Paris (working with Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Picasso and Matisse) and founded one of the first and arguably most influential American ballet companies and schools (The New York City Ballet and the School of American Ballet.) He also changed the face of American ballet: His protégé Arthur Mitchell broke the color barrier by becoming the first Black principal in classical ballet and with Balanchine's encouragement went on to found the Dance Theatre of Harlem in 1968 after the assassination of Martin Luther King. He cultivated and created roles for Maria Tallchief, who with her sister Marjorie, became the first famous Native American ballerinas. He worked closely with Stravinsky to create a series of innovative modern ballets. But Balanchine's work wasn't confined to classical ballet: he was also a vital part of American popular culture, working in the Broadway musical theater and Hollywood films. His work with African American dancers Katherine Dunham, the Nicholas Brothers, and Josephine Baker influenced their development and his own. He collaborated with composers Richard Rogers and Lorenz Hart, George and Ira Gershwin, Vernon Duke and Harold Arlen working on such musicals as "On Your Toes" (for which he created the landmark ballet Slaughter on 10th Avenue), Cabin in the Sky, I Married an Angel and House of Flowers.

Balanchine was no snob. He considered his work in the musical theatre and Hollywood films as important artistic endeavors and excitedly embraced American popular culture, infusing his ballet work with the rhythms and steps of American jazz dance and combining it with the Imperial Russian ballet tradition. This fusion of "fine" and "popular" art resulted in a new American style of classical dance and dancers as well as a reinvigoration of dance forms in the American musical theatre.

The seminar will involve class discussion and analysis of Balanchine's choreography supplemented by readings and viewings of Balanchine's work on video tape and film. Students will write an original research paper and present their findings to the class in a seminar report at the end of the academic term. Active participation in class discussion of the readings and viewings will be important. We will try to arrange a field trip to a live performance of Balanchine's work and students may have a chance to view at least one "Balanchine" technique class. You do not have to be a dancer to take this course. Any one interested in the history of dance, art and/or music and the development of both "fine" and popular arts in twentieth century America is welcome. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or RCHUMS 260 or DANCE 220 or RCHUMS 235 (World Dance) OR permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 480. Dramatic Theory and Criticism.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Walsh

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280 and three drama courses. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 — Advanced Acting Workshop: Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, RCHUMS 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this advanced acting workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore two major plays of the early modern theatre. Both halves of the academic term will be dedicated to script analysis through rehearsal and performance of one major work and will result in a fully produced production in the Residential College Auditorium at midterm and end of term. Students will be encouraged to participate not only as actors, but as assistant directors, dramaturges and designers. Admission is audition or interview only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Admission is by audition or interview only.

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 — Stratford Field Trip/Introduction to Shakespeare Criticism. [2 credits]. Class meets Sept-Oct only (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Foreign LitMini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A intensive study of three Shakespeare plays in preparation for an October field-trip to the Stratford Festival in Ontario. Readings in current criticism of the plays and in their recent stage histories will explore the relationship of current Shakespeare criticism to current Shakespeare production. An essay exam based on production/interpretational issues identified after the trip will culminate the course.

Plays: Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Love's Labours Lost and The Taming of the Shrew (Fri-Sat, October 24-25).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 — Twelfth Night Minicourse. Meets October 29 to November 26 [2 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=November 4).

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Foreign LitMini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A study of Shakespeare's great comedy in preparation for the Globe Theater's production, 18-23 November. The minicourse will include interviews with Globe Theater personnel; a viewing of Trevor Nunn's 1996 film version; and guest lectures on recent trends in criticism, the play's recent stage history, and the Globe Theater restoration project. Take-home final exam based on the productions and critical issues developed in class discussions. The class meets from October 29 to November 26. No prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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