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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Interdivisional


This page was created at 7:04 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 001 — Marxism. (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objectives of this course are to help students achieve a full understanding of the philosophy of Marxism — its roots, its theoretical integrity, and its applications, both in the 19th century and today.

We will read and study some classic texts, by Marx and others. Both defenses and attacks on these views will be discussed; our object throughout will not be advocacy but the comprehension of the work of one of the greatest philosophers of the modern world, and of the great movement of which Karl Marx is the central philosophical force.

Texts:

  • The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts, K. Marx
  • The Communist Manifesto, K. Marx and F. Engels
  • Socialism, Utopian and Scientific, F. Engels
  • "Left Wing" Communism: An Infantile Disorder, V.I. Lenin
  • Plus a small course pack, with selections (from Hegel, Feuerbach, and Marx) taken from my book: Communism, Fascism, and Democracy.

The course will be structured as follows:

  • Week 1.The Roots of Marxism: Hegel, Feuerbach, Utopian Socialism.
  • Week 2.Marx's early thought: Alienation and exploitation in capitalism.
  • Week 3.Dialectical Materialism: the central works of Marx and Engels, and the stages of revolution.
  • Week 4.Dialectical Materialism continued: Das Capital and the integration of philosophical and economic theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 002 — German Theater. Dates to be determined

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/theater.htm

In this one-credit course, students will be introduced to some traditions in German theater and to the major German theater journals. We will read several German dramas together as a group and will focus on pronunciation and fluency, using speech exercises by Rudolf Steiner. Finally, students will be introduced to the working methods of RC Deutsches Theater which will take place in Winter 2003 through theater warm-ups and theater designed to improve concentration and flexibility acting. This mini-course will meet for 8 sessions during the term. (Dates to be announced by September 1st). Each student also will meet with the instructor twice outside of class for individual work on pronunciation and diction. All students will keep a journal. No tests and no papers required. Open to students in second-year German and above.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 003 — Beginning Javanese Dance. Meets with Dance 347.001.

Instructor(s): Olivia Widyastuti

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will study the technical skills, vocabulary, and repertory of classical Javanese dance. There will be instruction in the basic ways of walking, moving the hands and the head, and working with the dance scarf for the two types of dance performed by females (putrid and alus) and the two types of dance performed by males (gagah and alus). Students also will be given instruction in how to follow the rhythms of the Javanese gamelan orchestra that accompanies the dance. In addition, students will learn about the philosophical/spiritual underpinning of Javanese dance. After the students have learned the basic movements characteristic of all Javanese classical dance, they will begin to study particular characters and dances. Near the end of the academic term, students will participate in a dance drama. Students will be expected to learn their parts and to attend all rehearsals and the performance. In the month prior to the concert, they will be expected to attend additional rehearsals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 004 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Gordon-Gurfinkel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCIDIV 351. Special Topics.

Section 001 — Advanced Javanese Dance. Meets with Dance 348.002.

Instructor(s): Wasi Bantolo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will study the technical skills, vocabulary, and repertory of classical Javanese dance. There will be instruction in the basic ways of walking, moving the hands and the head, and working with the dance scarf for the two types of dance performed by females (putrid and alus) and the two types of dance performed by males (gagah and alus). Students also will be given instruction in how to follow the rhythms of the Javanese gamelan orchestra that accompanies the dance. In addition, students will learn about the philosophical/spiritual underpinning of Javanese dance. After the students have learned the basic movements characteristic of all Javanese classical dance, they will begin to study particular characters and dances. Near the end of the academic term, students will participate in a dance drama. Students will be expected to learn their parts and to attend all rehearsals and the performance. In the month prior to the concert, they will be expected to attend additional rehearsals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCIDIV 351. Special Topics.

Section 002 — Telling It.

Instructor(s): Deborah Gordon-Gurfinkel (dmgordon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will be working with university and community artists to use the arts to enhance the writing skills of children staying in Washtenaw County homeless shelters. Students will need to make a one term commitment to the project, meeting on Monday afternoons to prepare for a Wednesday afternoon playshop with the children. Each week the team will develop a creative arts playshop that will work to channel the experiences of a group of 7-11 year-olds into writing.

The course is designed for students who are interested in early childhood education and how to use the arts as an educational tool. The project is community-based and targets a severely under-served population which will meet both at the RC. As the academic term progresses, students will be required to keep a journal of their experiences and observations with special attention to how the arts affect literacy.

The course is limited to ten students who are sophomores, juniors, or seniors and who either have had some experience with community groups and/or who have studied sociology. Students also will enroll for RCIDIV 350.004(#31673) for 1 credit. The course requires students to be free Mondays and Wednesdays from 4-7.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCIDIV 351. Special Topics.

Section 003 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Carl Schneider

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCIDIV 391 / ENVIRON 391. Sustainability and the Campus.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine E Badgley

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in environmental studies, global change, or related field (e.g., ENVIRON 201, 240, 270). (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/391/001.nsf

This course explores the ecological, and to some degree, social sustainability in higher education in a dynamic, interactive way. Course readings focus on pressing environmental issues facing the world and the campus, as well as providing examples of how campuses are successfully dealing with these issues. Through readings, field trips, lectures and projects, students become familiar with different aspects of the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor campus. Comparison is made with sustainable practices at other university campuses as well as with services at the university. Students write short weekly critiques, a research paper, and conduct a substantial group project on an environmental issue of campus life. This project is the basis of a longer report and presentation to the class and to relevant university administrators. Thus, this course focuses on active, participation-based learning, and students should leave the course with tools and experience to create campus environmental change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for RCIDIV.


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This page was created at 7:04 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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