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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Social Science


This page was created at 7:20 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)



RCSSCI 222 / SOC 222. Strategies in Social Interaction: An Introduction to Game Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores human society from the interdisciplinary social science perspective of contemporary game theory, the theory of strategies in social interaction. Game theory is widely employed in several social scientific disciplines, e.g., political science, economics, sociology, as well as in interdisciplinary studies and in evolutionary biology. Game theory facilitates understanding interactions in which agents choose strategies in the light of their expectations of the choice of strategies of others, e.g., much of human social life.

Although the course is not especially technically demanding (requiring nothing more than some high school math), it does require systematic thought and study. Some of the course involves conducting experiments by playing various tried-and-true games which illustrate fundamental social relationships. The main text is Games of Strategy by Avinash Dixit and Susan Skeath (W.W. Norton, 1999). Written work consists primarily of exercises elucidating particular topics. The course provides extensive opportunities for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 290. Social Science Basic Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed for students at the sophomore level or above who are seriously considering a Social Science concentration in the Residential College. The seminar is a requirement in the Social Science program; its purpose is to prepare students to pursue a concentration in Social Science in the RC.

Seminar sessions will introduce students to the RC Social Science faculty and upper-level Social Science concentrators, and discussion will center on how to turn general interests into problems that can be investigated systematically. Early on, students will begin working on their own with guidance from faculty and upper-level students whose interests complement theirs in order to complete the principal goal of the seminar: designing a coherent, individualized program of study for the Social Science concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 301. Social Science Theory I: From Social Contract to Oedipus Complex.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gayle S Rubin (grubin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least one 200-level social science course. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine closely a selection of theories of societies, social stratification, and social transformation which were produced by writers located in metropolitan centers of Europe and the United States between the 17th and 19th centuries. We will focus on how various writers thought about social structures and how to obtain knowledge about them. We will read selected texts by Marx, Darwin, Weber, Durkheim, Freud, and others. Students are required to write short responses to the texts before class, a detailed analysis of one major theoretical work and a syntopical review essay that considers several works together. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussions. This course is required of RC Social Science concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 315. International Grassroots Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does "development" really mean in the Third World? Do people need Western education? Business know-how? Provision of basic services? Gender equality? A national consciousness? Something to believe in? Liberation? To just be left alone? In this course, we will look at how different definitions of "the problem" drive different solutions proposed by governments, aid agencies, religious groups, and grassroots organizations. Besides posing some heavy questions, this course will give you an idea of what it's really like to work in the field of international "development", either at home or abroad. Be prepared for lively discussion, a deep, personal examination of your own beliefs and values, lots of writing — and lots of help with your writing. Some previous courses in economics, political science, third world area studies and/or lived experience will be very helpful, though not required.

The instructor is a writer for Peace Corps and has been involved in international development in Asia, Africa, and the South Pacific and in training programs for foreign nationals in the U.S.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 330. Urban and Community Studies I.

Section 001 — Meets with CAAS 358.006.

Instructor(s): Stephen Ward (smward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore central issues and concerns involved in the study of contemporary urban life, focusing in particular on the historical and theoretical dimensions of urban community studies. We will begin with a review of the various meanings and uses of the idea of "community." Next we will study the historical development of American cities with an emphasis on the processes of African American migration and urbanization during the first half of the twentieth century and the relationship of these social experiences to the development of cities in post-World War II America. We will then move to explorations of specific urban areas and the dynamics of community formation, including social and political activism. Here we will seek to understand how individuals, neighborhoods, and other social groupings create and sustain communities in the context of (and as a response to) urban social conditions. Throughout the semester we will be guided by three broad objectives. First, students will become familiar with core ideas and debates surrounding contemporary urban issues. Secondly, this course aims to provide students with a foundation upon which to engage in further, more advanced research and study of urban communities. Finally, students will gain some understanding of the challenges and opportunities involved in community work. In particular, this course is designed to help develop the analytical tools and historical perspective necessary to work with people and organizations dedicated to affecting social change in urban communities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 001 — : A History of European Immigration and Race Relations in America: the Conflict Between Ideals and Reality. Meets with CAAS 358.003.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Brown (krbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 358.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 001 — Poetry & Social Activism.

Instructor(s): Derrick I M Gilbert (derrickg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although this is a "poetry" course, we will focus on the role of poetry off the page and outside of the classroom. That is, we will explore how poetry is used in community work and social activism. We will begin with an examination of historical literary social movements in which social engagement was the sine qua non of the aesthetic. Throughout the course we will also workshop each other's writings; however, we will focus on engaging our local Ann Arbor/Detroit communities with the written and spoken word.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 002 — Women and Higher Education: 1700-2003. Meets with WOMENSTD 484.001.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Steneck (msten@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with the colonial era and continuing to the present, this seminar will explore the experiences, problems and challenges encountered by women in seeking gender, racial, and ethnic equity in American higher education. As the first university of national importance to admit women, UM provides an ideal vehicle for exploring the history of women and higher education within the context of the long-standing debate over the place of women in American post-secondary education. Primary and secondary sources will be used to delineate the cultural and historical context of women's education nationally with particular attention given to the history of women at UM. Along with recent research on women and higher education nationally and at UM, students may choose to read from a selection of autobiographies and novels by UM alumnae and recent biographies on prominent UM and other national leaders in order to further understand this historical experience. Students will do independent research on a self-selected aspect of women's education utilizing the materials available for research in campus libraries and archives, including the Bentley Historical Library, the Center for the Education of Women, Women's Studies and CAAS.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for RCSSCI.


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