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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 1:26 PM on Thu, Mar 13, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)

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ANTHRBIO 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andres R Frisancho (arfrisan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 169. Natural Selection.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 365. Human Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. High school biology is assumed. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Human evolution has been a biological process with both social and physical aspects. Through lectures, discussion section, laboratory, and reading, the interrelated process of behavioral and physical change is outlined for humans and their ancestors. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary mechanisms, and context is provided through an understanding of the pre-human primates. The human story begins with origins and the appearance of unique human features such as bipedality, the loss of cutting canines, the appearance of continual sexual receptivity, births requiring midwifery, and the development of complex social interactions. An early adaptive shift sets the stage for the subsequent evolution of intelligence, technology, and the changes in physical form that are the consequence of the unique feedback system involving cultural and biological change. The "Eve" theory and other ideas about the origin of modern humanity and human races, and their development and relationships, are discussed in this context. Class participation and discussion are emphasized, and there is a required discussion/laboratory section for elaboration of lecture topics and supervised hands-on experience with primate skeletal material and replicas of human fossils. Student evaluations are based on two examinations, laboratory quizzes, and a laboratory exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 368 / PSYCH 338. Primate Social Behavior I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating, and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural enviornmental and social settings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRBIO 563. Mechanisms of Human Adaptation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRBIO.


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